Community

Community, Artist Support, Mural

Google Fiber murals

Louisville Visual Art has forged a new and dynamic partnership with Google Fiber. Together, we commissioned artists for three murals celebrating Louisville's diverse neighborhoods and unique culture.

After receiving submissions from more than 70 local and regional artists, LVA and Google Fiber collaborated to select three very talented locals, all working in very distinct styles, to bring more color to different Louisville neighborhoods. Finalists were invited to submit a site-specific proposal for one mural each. The mural designs reflect each artist's vision of Louisville's diversity, independence, and optimism. The three artists are Carrie Donovan, Liz Richter and Carlos Gamez de Francisco.

Carrie Donovan worked in Portland at The Table restaurant in the Church of the Promise building (1800 Portland Avenue, owned by Kathie & Larry Stoess). “'Portland flows with promise'” is a phrase that represents all that happens in the Promise building," Donovan said. "The shapes connect the different aspects of their work, and the banner and the type express the idea of 'flow' — like the river, and like the way their work flows into the community."

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Carlos Gamez de Francisco  brightened up a wall on the side of the Nitty Gritty vintage clothing store (996 Barret Ave., owned by Terri Burt) in the Highlands. He sought "to give visibility to one of the most important features of the people of Louisville: acceptance, respect, and tolerance to others," he said. Burt is thrilled by his work and said, "Everyone loves it. I actually have people coming into my business to tell me how cool the mural is on the building. My business neighbors love having it represent the 'hood." Gamez de Francisco 's folkloric style is synergistic with the colorful and eclectic feel of this neighborhood, and his images reference different immigrant cultures represented in Louisville. Burt added, "The building is much more noticeable. It has become a conversation in the Louisville art scene."

Carlos Gamez de Francisco brightened up a wall on the side of the Nitty Gritty vintage clothing store (996 Barret Ave., owned by Terri Burt) in the Highlands. He sought "to give visibility to one of the most important features of the people of Louisville: acceptance, respect, and tolerance to others," he said. Burt is thrilled by his work and said, "Everyone loves it. I actually have people coming into my business to tell me how cool the mural is on the building. My business neighbors love having it represent the 'hood." Gamez de Francisco 's folkloric style is synergistic with the colorful and eclectic feel of this neighborhood, and his images reference different immigrant cultures represented in Louisville. Burt added, "The building is much more noticeable. It has become a conversation in the Louisville art scene."

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Liz Richter  added to the growing mural movement in NuLu on the side of Red Tree Furniture (701 E. Market St., owned by Garwood Linton). "I believe my design will help elevate the local culture as it relates to the mural scene by providing an example of a different kind of street art then what is seen around town, and from a distinctly feminine perspective. I want to make this mural bold, exuberant and engaging," Richter said. Her Kentucky Wildflower is "signifying the growth of local businesses and freethinking individuals. Overlapping, interdependent blades and flowers illustrate a community of connectivity."

Liz Richter added to the growing mural movement in NuLu on the side of Red Tree Furniture (701 E. Market St., owned by Garwood Linton). "I believe my design will help elevate the local culture as it relates to the mural scene by providing an example of a different kind of street art then what is seen around town, and from a distinctly feminine perspective. I want to make this mural bold, exuberant and engaging," Richter said. Her Kentucky Wildflower is "signifying the growth of local businesses and freethinking individuals. Overlapping, interdependent blades and flowers illustrate a community of connectivity."

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Support from corporate partners, like Google Fiber, for public art projects celebrating distinct local perspectives has a significant impact on both neighborhoods and the business community.  Louisville Visual Art Executive Director Lindy Casebier said, “Public art makes a big difference in every community. We are thrilled that Louisville is one of five cities chosen across the U.S.”

Support from corporate partners, like Google Fiber, for public art projects celebrating distinct local perspectives has a significant impact on both neighborhoods and the business community.

Louisville Visual Art Executive Director Lindy Casebier said, “Public art makes a big difference in every community. We are thrilled that Louisville is one of five cities chosen across the U.S.”

Events, Artist Support, Community

Open Studio Weekend 2017 - Day 2

How can we best sum up the many highlights of even just the second day of Open Studio Weekend? 2017 was even bigger and better than ever, thanks to the more than 100 artists who opened their studios to the public all over Louisville. LVA was thrilled that our partnership with the University of Louisville's Hite Art Institute has been so well-received. We'll see you again on November 3 & 4, 2018!

Lori LaRusso at KyCAD's Candy Factory with a guest

Lori LaRusso at KyCAD's Candy Factory with a guest

Josh Johnson answers questions at Art Sanctuary

Josh Johnson answers questions at Art Sanctuary

Debbie Shannon meets LVA's Executive Director, Lindy Casebier

Debbie Shannon meets LVA's Executive Director, Lindy Casebier

Events, Artist Support, Community

Open Studio Weekend 2017 - Day 1

How can we best sum up the many highlights of even just the first day of Open Studio Weekend? 2017 was even bigger and better than ever, thanks to the more than 100 artists who opened their studios to the public all over Louisville. LVA was thrilled that our partnership with the University of Louisville's Hite Art Institute has been so well-received. We'll see you again on November 3 & 4, 2018!

Hyland Glass and fans.

Hyland Glass and fans.

Joyce Garner  

Joyce Garner
 

Page Penna at Hope Mills

Page Penna at Hope Mills

Community, Artist Support

In Memoriam: Mary Ann Currier (1927-2017)

Image courtesy KET

Image courtesy KET

On the Kentucky Women Artists Directory, the facts of Mary Ann Currier's life begin this way:

Married          Lionel F Currier July 2 1949

Attended        Chicago School of Fine Art 1945-1947
                        Louisville School of Art 1952-1962

Taught at       Louisville School of Art 1962-1982

For many of us, that last line is the how and why of knowing her. She was not just our teacher, but an example of what a teacher should be: patient, wise, and filled with joy for the making of art - a vital influence for more than one generation of Kentucky artists. She was often the only woman studying art in a classroom of GI’s, and her two triumphant shows in NYC placed her in permanent collections that allow her work to remain online, forever archived, enabling her rich legacy to live on.

Onions and Tomato, Mary Ann Currier (American, born 1927), Oil pastel, collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Onions and Tomato, Mary Ann Currier (American, born 1927), Oil pastel, collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Visitation will be on Wednesday, November 8th, from 4 - 8 pm at Ratterman's Funeral Home in St. Matthews (3711 Lexington Road).

Watch a very worthwhile KET documentary on Mary Ann here.

Community, Artist Support

In memoriam: Charlotte Price

The passing of Charlotte “Toddy” Price saddens everyone in the Louisville Visual Art family. An artist and a philanthropist who supported the LVA mission throughout her life, Charlotte led the capital campaign to renovate the Louisville Water Tower in 1978-79 so the Art Center Association could move in and grow its programming. It was a crucial transition in the history of our organization and we could not have done it without her.

Sculptor Ed Hamilton shared these thoughts with us:
"Dear lord, Charlotte Price was a wonderful person as well as a great artist sculptor.
When I had no work and no paycheck, she put me to work so I could earn money to feed my family.
I will never forget her kindness during those lean times.
And to the family - your mom was the best!
Love you, Charlotte."

Charlotte Price with sculptor Ed Hamilton in 2009:

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Artist Support, Community, CFAC

Louisville Visual Art helps community and budding artists

William Porter, photographed by Richard Grubola in 2008.    Written by Lindy Casebier, Guest Contributor to the   Louisville Courier-Journal   Another new school year has begun, and since 1925, that has also meant another beginning for Children’s Fine Art Classes offered through Louisville Visual Art. Our name has changed over the past 92 years, but our programming and its outcomes have remained constant: teaching creativity and fostering the next generation of doers and problem-solvers in our community.  In the early years of CFAC, Mary Spencer Nay was inspired to pursue a distinguished career that would lead to the Marcia C. Hite professorship of painting at the University of Louisville. Her work is now held in the permanent collections of the Evansville Museum of Arts and Science and the Speed Museum.  Innovation and design were implanted in the mind of a young William Porter, who went on to serve as Studio Chief Designer at General Motors for three decades. He made his mark with the 1968 Pontiac GTO and the 1970-73 Firebird 400 and was a valued player in the world of automobile design. One of his teachers back when LVA was known as the Art Center Association School had been Mary Spencer Nay, proving directly how one child’s education can spread to help others.  Sculptor Ed Hamilton, another CFAC alum, attests that while other doors were closed to him, he found opportunity through the Children’s Free Art Classes program. Countless lives have been touched through his artistic interpretation of a young Abraham Lincoln and the unloading of slave boats at the edge of the Ohio River, as well as his impressive overall body of work that now graces landscapes across our country.  Gordon Brown, a former president and CEO of Home of the Innocents, led that organization through a period of unprecedented growth. He is a proud alum of CFAC and Shawnee High School who has never forgotten his roots and remains active today in the Portland neighborhood. Throughout his distinguished career, he has been a staunch advocate for the transformational and healing power of art.  Artist, educator and musician Carrie Neumayer has been a frequent art contributor to Louisville Magazine and an LVA instructor. She was a co-founder of the Louisville Outskirts Festival, which led to Girls Rock Louisville, a program aiming to empower female musicians in a supportive, inclusive environment. She was recently able to travel to Kazakhstan through a grant from the State Department to help work with youth interested in learning about creating art.  These are examples of the immense importance of art education in the lives of a few Louisvillians who, in their distinct ways, have all made a significant impact in education, commerce, healthcare, social services and, of course, the arts. Their contributions underscore the need for art education for all children. Art enhances our lives and our communities. Art causes us to question and to think. Art soothes and calms our collective souls. Through the years, art has been used to tell the story of those who came before. Exposure to and education in the arts does have a place in a civilized society.  As a creative hub now established in the Portland neighborhood, Louisville Visual Art is committed to removing barriers and building bridges throughout our community. With classes offered at more than 30 sites throughout Louisville Metro, Southern Indiana and surrounding counties, providing quality instruction to over 5,500 students annually, LVA is shaping the next generation of creative leaders, and is dedicated to enhancing our community through visual art education, community outreach and artist support. Check us out on social media and at louisvillevisualart.org   Lindy Casebier is the executive director of the Louisville Visual Art.

William Porter, photographed by Richard Grubola in 2008.

Written by Lindy Casebier, Guest Contributor to the Louisville Courier-Journal

Another new school year has begun, and since 1925, that has also meant another beginning for Children’s Fine Art Classes offered through Louisville Visual Art. Our name has changed over the past 92 years, but our programming and its outcomes have remained constant: teaching creativity and fostering the next generation of doers and problem-solvers in our community.

In the early years of CFAC, Mary Spencer Nay was inspired to pursue a distinguished career that would lead to the Marcia C. Hite professorship of painting at the University of Louisville. Her work is now held in the permanent collections of the Evansville Museum of Arts and Science and the Speed Museum.

Innovation and design were implanted in the mind of a young William Porter, who went on to serve as Studio Chief Designer at General Motors for three decades. He made his mark with the 1968 Pontiac GTO and the 1970-73 Firebird 400 and was a valued player in the world of automobile design. One of his teachers back when LVA was known as the Art Center Association School had been Mary Spencer Nay, proving directly how one child’s education can spread to help others.

Sculptor Ed Hamilton, another CFAC alum, attests that while other doors were closed to him, he found opportunity through the Children’s Free Art Classes program. Countless lives have been touched through his artistic interpretation of a young Abraham Lincoln and the unloading of slave boats at the edge of the Ohio River, as well as his impressive overall body of work that now graces landscapes across our country.

Gordon Brown, a former president and CEO of Home of the Innocents, led that organization through a period of unprecedented growth. He is a proud alum of CFAC and Shawnee High School who has never forgotten his roots and remains active today in the Portland neighborhood. Throughout his distinguished career, he has been a staunch advocate for the transformational and healing power of art.

Artist, educator and musician Carrie Neumayer has been a frequent art contributor to Louisville Magazine and an LVA instructor. She was a co-founder of the Louisville Outskirts Festival, which led to Girls Rock Louisville, a program aiming to empower female musicians in a supportive, inclusive environment. She was recently able to travel to Kazakhstan through a grant from the State Department to help work with youth interested in learning about creating art.

These are examples of the immense importance of art education in the lives of a few Louisvillians who, in their distinct ways, have all made a significant impact in education, commerce, healthcare, social services and, of course, the arts. Their contributions underscore the need for art education for all children. Art enhances our lives and our communities. Art causes us to question and to think. Art soothes and calms our collective souls. Through the years, art has been used to tell the story of those who came before. Exposure to and education in the arts does have a place in a civilized society.

As a creative hub now established in the Portland neighborhood, Louisville Visual Art is committed to removing barriers and building bridges throughout our community. With classes offered at more than 30 sites throughout Louisville Metro, Southern Indiana and surrounding counties, providing quality instruction to over 5,500 students annually, LVA is shaping the next generation of creative leaders, and is dedicated to enhancing our community through visual art education, community outreach and artist support. Check us out on social media and at louisvillevisualart.org

Lindy Casebier is the executive director of the Louisville Visual Art.

Exhibits, Community, Artist Support

Plein Air Paint Out 2017

LVA held our second annual Plein Air Paint Out from 8am-3pm on Sunday, September 17. It was part of a day of fun at the site of the future Waterfront Botanical Gardens that also featured:

A food truck, adult beverages, crafts, demos, nature activities, and more, including a large flower mandala weed walk, solar power demonstration, free canoe tours, butterfly tent, beekeeping, rainwater demo, raptors, baby goats, face painting, a paper flower workshop, a bonsai display and live music by the Porch Possums. Did we forget anything?!?

LVA Executive Director Lindy Casebier with winning artist Carrie Johns, whose piece is below:

LVA Executive Director Lindy Casebier with winning artist Carrie Johns, whose piece is below:

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Community

Althea Jackson: A Tribute from LVA

To look at her, you would not believe she is ready to retire - yet on August 31, Althea Jackson will spend her last day on the job at Louisville Metro Hall.  For 27 years, she has worked for Metro Government, mostly in the Mayor’s Office. Her duties over that enviable length of service were far-ranging, but her experience as the key arts & culture contact for three mayors was the foundation of her outstanding reputation and where her legacy will rest. During the current administration, she helped bring exhibits into Metro Hall representing Louisville Visual Art, the University of Louisville, the Frazier Museum and the Speed Museum. In addition, Althea hosted "Metro Matters," a weekly radio show on 1350 WLOU and 104.7 FM that was an essential vehicle for outreach in the community.  Althea served on the board of directors for Louisville Visual Art for several years, and all at LVA are sad to see her go ... but excited at what adventures lie ahead. LVA congratulates her on such distinguished service to our community!  

To look at her, you would not believe she is ready to retire - yet on August 31, Althea Jackson will spend her last day on the job at Louisville Metro Hall.

For 27 years, she has worked for Metro Government, mostly in the Mayor’s Office. Her duties over that enviable length of service were far-ranging, but her experience as the key arts & culture contact for three mayors was the foundation of her outstanding reputation and where her legacy will rest. During the current administration, she helped bring exhibits into Metro Hall representing Louisville Visual Art, the University of Louisville, the Frazier Museum and the Speed Museum. In addition, Althea hosted "Metro Matters," a weekly radio show on 1350 WLOU and 104.7 FM that was an essential vehicle for outreach in the community.

Althea served on the board of directors for Louisville Visual Art for several years, and all at LVA are sad to see her go ... but excited at what adventures lie ahead. LVA congratulates her on such distinguished service to our community!
 

Artist Support, Community

LVA staffer, member awarded prestigious Fellowship

Ann Stewart Anderson, LVA member   LVA Creative Design Director Amy Chase, a ceramic artist, and Ann Stewart Anderson, a mixed media artist, are two of six Kentucky artists awarded a $7,500 Al Smith Individual Artist Fellowship from the  Kentucky Arts Council  "for exemplifying excellence in their respective creative disciplines."  The Fellowship award was named in 1983 in honor of Al Smith, a journalist and Kentucky Arts Council board chair. This program has since been able to distribute a few million dollars to emerging artists in the Commonwealth.  “Our Al Smith Fellowship and Emerging Artist Award recipients represent the best in their disciplines, and we count them as ambassadors for Kentucky’s artistic excellence,” said Lydia Bailey Brown, Arts Council executive director. “Their awards are well deserved, and we look forward to more great work from them in the future.”

Ann Stewart Anderson, LVA member

LVA Creative Design Director Amy Chase, a ceramic artist, and Ann Stewart Anderson, a mixed media artist, are two of six Kentucky artists awarded a $7,500 Al Smith Individual Artist Fellowship from the Kentucky Arts Council "for exemplifying excellence in their respective creative disciplines."

The Fellowship award was named in 1983 in honor of Al Smith, a journalist and Kentucky Arts Council board chair. This program has since been able to distribute a few million dollars to emerging artists in the Commonwealth.

“Our Al Smith Fellowship and Emerging Artist Award recipients represent the best in their disciplines, and we count them as ambassadors for Kentucky’s artistic excellence,” said Lydia Bailey Brown, Arts Council executive director. “Their awards are well deserved, and we look forward to more great work from them in the future.”

Amy Chase, LVA Creative Design Director

Amy Chase, LVA Creative Design Director