Murals

PUBLIC Radio

LVA's Artebella On The Radio: September 19, 2019

Eric King from the Fund for the Arts, Louisville Visual Art Mural Art Program Director Katy Delahanty, and artists Braylyn Stewart & Ashley Cathey all joined me this Thursday to talk about the October 20 Imagine Mural Festival taking place in the Smoketown neighborhood. Tune in to WXOX 97.1 FM, or stream on Artxfm.com each Thursday at 10am to hear Keith Waits talk with artists.

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Eric King is the new Director of Communications and Engagement for the Louisville Fund for the Arts. King previously served as a Senior Strategist for C2 Strategic Communications, a News Anchor and Special Projects Reporter with WLKY-TV, Louisville’s CBS affiliate, and is currently a Board Member of the Bardstown Foundation for Excellence in Public Education, as a reporter, he earned three Emmy awards for reporting and an Edward R. Murrow award for documentary production. 

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Braylyn Resko Stewart Born in Youngstown Ohio but grew up all over the world. His Army veteran father was stationed in Germany when the Berlin Wall came down, which was a formative experience. He attended DuPont Manual High School and has remained in Louisville. Braylyn is a tattoo and mural artist whose work has been featured at The Speed Museum and at various other public events and locations around Louisville.


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Ashley Cathey is a Louisville native whose paintings have brought her to prominence in a fairly short time after moving back to Louisville from Chicago. When she returned, she quickly found her footing and exhibited work in a group show at the Louisville Community Center, one of the Metro Parks community centers overseen by Portia White. From there, Cathey caught the attention of ArtsReach’s Julia Youngblood, who commissioned Cathey to create a series of portraits, which ArtsReach used for posters for their annual Keepers of the Dream celebration at the Kentucky Center for the Arts. 

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Katy Delahanty is a graduate of Cooper Union with a strong background in art, teaching and mediation. She is the Outreach Director and head of the Mural Art Program (MAP) for Louisville Visual Art and a member of the board of directors for the Portland Museum.

PUBLIC Radio

LVA's Artebella On The Radio 10.4.18

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Casey McKinney joined us October 4 on LVA's Artebella On The Radio to discuss his current exhibit, When Elements Collide, at Mellwood Art Center’s Pigment Gallery. Casey is also a sculptor and muralist and you will see examples of both at Mellwood. Tune in to WXOX 97.1 FM/Artxfm.com at 10am each Thursday to listen to artists talk about their work.

Because the host forgot to start the archive recording, the recording picks up about 20 minutes into the hours. Sorry Casey.

Community, Artist Support, Mural

Google Fiber murals

Louisville Visual Art has forged a new and dynamic partnership with Google Fiber. Together, we commissioned artists for three murals celebrating Louisville's diverse neighborhoods and unique culture.

After receiving submissions from more than 70 local and regional artists, LVA and Google Fiber collaborated to select three very talented locals, all working in very distinct styles, to bring more color to different Louisville neighborhoods. Finalists were invited to submit a site-specific proposal for one mural each. The mural designs reflect each artist's vision of Louisville's diversity, independence, and optimism. The three artists are Carrie Donovan, Liz Richter and Carlos Gamez de Francisco.

Carrie Donovan worked in Portland at The Table restaurant in the Church of the Promise building (1800 Portland Avenue, owned by Kathie & Larry Stoess). “'Portland flows with promise'” is a phrase that represents all that happens in the Promise building," Donovan said. "The shapes connect the different aspects of their work, and the banner and the type express the idea of 'flow' — like the river, and like the way their work flows into the community."

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Carlos Gamez de Francisco  brightened up a wall on the side of the Nitty Gritty vintage clothing store (996 Barret Ave., owned by Terri Burt) in the Highlands. He sought "to give visibility to one of the most important features of the people of Louisville: acceptance, respect, and tolerance to others," he said. Burt is thrilled by his work and said, "Everyone loves it. I actually have people coming into my business to tell me how cool the mural is on the building. My business neighbors love having it represent the 'hood." Gamez de Francisco 's folkloric style is synergistic with the colorful and eclectic feel of this neighborhood, and his images reference different immigrant cultures represented in Louisville. Burt added, "The building is much more noticeable. It has become a conversation in the Louisville art scene."

Carlos Gamez de Francisco brightened up a wall on the side of the Nitty Gritty vintage clothing store (996 Barret Ave., owned by Terri Burt) in the Highlands. He sought "to give visibility to one of the most important features of the people of Louisville: acceptance, respect, and tolerance to others," he said. Burt is thrilled by his work and said, "Everyone loves it. I actually have people coming into my business to tell me how cool the mural is on the building. My business neighbors love having it represent the 'hood." Gamez de Francisco 's folkloric style is synergistic with the colorful and eclectic feel of this neighborhood, and his images reference different immigrant cultures represented in Louisville. Burt added, "The building is much more noticeable. It has become a conversation in the Louisville art scene."

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Liz Richter  added to the growing mural movement in NuLu on the side of Red Tree Furniture (701 E. Market St., owned by Garwood Linton). "I believe my design will help elevate the local culture as it relates to the mural scene by providing an example of a different kind of street art then what is seen around town, and from a distinctly feminine perspective. I want to make this mural bold, exuberant and engaging," Richter said. Her Kentucky Wildflower is "signifying the growth of local businesses and freethinking individuals. Overlapping, interdependent blades and flowers illustrate a community of connectivity."

Liz Richter added to the growing mural movement in NuLu on the side of Red Tree Furniture (701 E. Market St., owned by Garwood Linton). "I believe my design will help elevate the local culture as it relates to the mural scene by providing an example of a different kind of street art then what is seen around town, and from a distinctly feminine perspective. I want to make this mural bold, exuberant and engaging," Richter said. Her Kentucky Wildflower is "signifying the growth of local businesses and freethinking individuals. Overlapping, interdependent blades and flowers illustrate a community of connectivity."

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Support from corporate partners, like Google Fiber, for public art projects celebrating distinct local perspectives has a significant impact on both neighborhoods and the business community.  Louisville Visual Art Executive Director Lindy Casebier said, “Public art makes a big difference in every community. We are thrilled that Louisville is one of five cities chosen across the U.S.”

Support from corporate partners, like Google Fiber, for public art projects celebrating distinct local perspectives has a significant impact on both neighborhoods and the business community.

Louisville Visual Art Executive Director Lindy Casebier said, “Public art makes a big difference in every community. We are thrilled that Louisville is one of five cities chosen across the U.S.”