Mary Alice Hadley Prize for Visual Art

PUBLIC Radio

LVA's Artebella On The Radio July 18, 2019

Naveen Chaubal is the recipient of the 2019 Hadley Prize for Visual Art. he will join us, along with his producing partner Bryn Silverman, to talk about their film "Pinball". Tune in to WXOX 97.1 FM/Artxfm.com to hear artists talk about their work on LVA's Artebella On The Radio.

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Pinball is a feature-length documentary and fictional narrative hybrid about a teenage Iraqi immigrant figuring out his life as he straddles the two worlds and cultures he embodies—the world from which he emigrated and his current life in Louisville.

The Hadley Prize will allow Chaubal and Silverman to travel to Egypt with the local teenager featured in Pinball, where they will document the teen’s first return visit to the place he identified as home before coming to America 10 years ago.

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Naveen Chaubal began making films while on a dramatic childhood family vacation amongst a forest in Michigan. Since then, he attended the USC School of Cinematic Arts and received the Thomas Bush Scholarship in Cinematography. Soon after graduating, he co-produced and co-shot “Tomorrow We Disappear,” a feature documentary about a displaced colony of traditional artists in India which premiered at the 2014 Tribeca Film Festival. He has worked for Mic.com, Vice News, Bon Appétit and produced music videos for James Blake and Frank Ocean. He has traveled the world directing and producing advertisements in the Middle East, Europe, and Central America. In 2012, Naveen went through Film Independent's Project Involve program. In 2015, he filmed a short documentary with Eric Garner’s family as they dealt with the aftermath of a senseless tragedy for AJ+. His recent short film "Pinball" screened at a Director's Guild showcase in Los Angeles, Syndicated Theater in Brooklyn, TIDE Festival, the Speed Art Museum, and the Kansas City Film Fest. "Pinball" the feature project, produced by Bryn Silverman, is a hybrid documentary fiction film and will paint a portrait of immigrant suburbia with Louisville as a lush backdrop.

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Bryn Silverman is an Oregon born Louisville based filmmaker whose work focuses on portraiture and people in both documentary and narrative film. She believes in entrepreneurship and seeing the world. She is a shorts screener for the Tribeca Film Festival. Most recently, she worked as a story-producer for a new Netflix series that will air in 2020.

Artist Support, Community, Events, Mural

Mary Alice Hadley Prize for Visual Art Winner Announced

The Community Foundation of Louisville, in partnership with Louisville Visual Art, is pleased to announce that Louisville-based multi-media artist  KCJ Szwedzinski  is the winner of the sixth annual Mary Alice Hadley Prize for Visual Art. The $5,000 award is an opportunity for local artists to enhance their careers through a targeted enrichment experience of their own design.  “My most recent body work has been on Jewish memory, identity and legacy," said Szwedzinski. "As an artist, I am continually mindful of who I intend as my audience. I question why it is important for me to make work about Judaism and how my work connects to contemporary issues.”  Szwedzinski will use the award to visit the Jewish Contemporary Museum and the Holocaust Center in San Francisco, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Archives in Washington, D.C., and the Genealogy Center in Fort Wayne, Indiana, as well as to take a course at the Rare Book School in Philadelphia.  "I believe that the act of remembering is a powerful tool in fostering empathy and breaking barriers of bias," Szwedzinski said. "It's important, now more than ever, to remind people that when true diversity is present in a community is when we all thrive."   Louisville Visual Art will honor KCJ Szwedzinski on Thursday, June 21, from 5:30-7:00 p.m. in their Portland gallery at 1538 Lytle Street, 40203. The reception is free and open to the public.     The $5,000 M.A. Hadley Prize is awarded from the George and Mary Alice Hadley Fund at the Community Foundation of Louisville. Focused on the arts and humanities, particularly visual arts, crafts, theater and the Louisville Free Public Library, the endowment has supported our community for more than 25 years.    The Hadley Prize winner is selected through a blind process by a diverse panel of arts professionals from Louisville and the surrounding area. The 2018 prize drew 40 applicants from the greater Louisville area, including Southern Indiana, whose work demonstrated mastery in ceramics, graphic design, drawing, crafts, painting, photography, sculpture, video, film and printmaking.  “Art soothes and calms our collective souls. Art causes us to question and to think. Through the years, art has been used to tell the story of those who came before. The work of KCJ Szwedzinski is powerful and will cause those who see her work to pause and reflect on this horrific period in our history,” said Louisville Visual Art's Executive Director, Lindy Casebier. “Louisville Visual Art is pleased to partner with the Community Foundation of Louisville in support of KCJ's growth as an artist and in turn share that personal growth with others in our community.”  Szwedzinski's itinerary has been designed to fuse personal history and artistic inspiration, "to synthesize seemingly disparate bodies of knowledge - archival practices for historical information and my personal inherited legacies."  “This experience will broaden my ability to make work that is rooted in my own Judaic heritage,” said Szwedzinski, “while facilitating engagement of a more universal audience.”    “It’s important for people to seek to find common ground and part of the way we do this is from remembering our collective history," said Susan Barry, President & CEO of the Community Foundation. "We are pleased the Hadley Prize will support an artist like KCJ, who is using art to begin difficult conversations around the Holocaust, one of the most tragic moments in our history."  The Community Foundation of Louisville believes that art is a vital part of a community where people and places thrive. The Hadley Prize is just one of the ways that the Community Foundation of Louisville supports local artists. Hadley Creatives is the Foundation's six-month comprehensive professional development program for working artists that recently celebrated its inaugural class with an exhibition that is running through July 1 at KMAC.

The Community Foundation of Louisville, in partnership with Louisville Visual Art, is pleased to announce that Louisville-based multi-media artist KCJ Szwedzinski is the winner of the sixth annual Mary Alice Hadley Prize for Visual Art. The $5,000 award is an opportunity for local artists to enhance their careers through a targeted enrichment experience of their own design.

“My most recent body work has been on Jewish memory, identity and legacy," said Szwedzinski. "As an artist, I am continually mindful of who I intend as my audience. I question why it is important for me to make work about Judaism and how my work connects to contemporary issues.”

Szwedzinski will use the award to visit the Jewish Contemporary Museum and the Holocaust Center in San Francisco, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Archives in Washington, D.C., and the Genealogy Center in Fort Wayne, Indiana, as well as to take a course at the Rare Book School in Philadelphia.

"I believe that the act of remembering is a powerful tool in fostering empathy and breaking barriers of bias," Szwedzinski said. "It's important, now more than ever, to remind people that when true diversity is present in a community is when we all thrive."

Louisville Visual Art will honor KCJ Szwedzinski on Thursday, June 21, from 5:30-7:00 p.m. in their Portland gallery at 1538 Lytle Street, 40203. The reception is free and open to the public.


The $5,000 M.A. Hadley Prize is awarded from the George and Mary Alice Hadley Fund at the Community Foundation of Louisville. Focused on the arts and humanities, particularly visual arts, crafts, theater and the Louisville Free Public Library, the endowment has supported our community for more than 25 years.

The Hadley Prize winner is selected through a blind process by a diverse panel of arts professionals from Louisville and the surrounding area. The 2018 prize drew 40 applicants from the greater Louisville area, including Southern Indiana, whose work demonstrated mastery in ceramics, graphic design, drawing, crafts, painting, photography, sculpture, video, film and printmaking.

“Art soothes and calms our collective souls. Art causes us to question and to think. Through the years, art has been used to tell the story of those who came before. The work of KCJ Szwedzinski is powerful and will cause those who see her work to pause and reflect on this horrific period in our history,” said Louisville Visual Art's Executive Director, Lindy Casebier. “Louisville Visual Art is pleased to partner with the Community Foundation of Louisville in support of KCJ's growth as an artist and in turn share that personal growth with others in our community.”

Szwedzinski's itinerary has been designed to fuse personal history and artistic inspiration, "to synthesize seemingly disparate bodies of knowledge - archival practices for historical information and my personal inherited legacies."

“This experience will broaden my ability to make work that is rooted in my own Judaic heritage,” said Szwedzinski, “while facilitating engagement of a more universal audience.”


“It’s important for people to seek to find common ground and part of the way we do this is from remembering our collective history," said Susan Barry, President & CEO of the Community Foundation. "We are pleased the Hadley Prize will support an artist like KCJ, who is using art to begin difficult conversations around the Holocaust, one of the most tragic moments in our history."

The Community Foundation of Louisville believes that art is a vital part of a community where people and places thrive. The Hadley Prize is just one of the ways that the Community Foundation of Louisville supports local artists. Hadley Creatives is the Foundation's six-month comprehensive professional development program for working artists that recently celebrated its inaugural class with an exhibition that is running through July 1 at KMAC.