Community Foundation of Louisville

PUBLIC Radio

LVA's Artebella On The Radio July 18, 2019

Naveen Chaubal is the recipient of the 2019 Hadley Prize for Visual Art. he will join us, along with his producing partner Bryn Silverman, to talk about their film "Pinball". Tune in to WXOX 97.1 FM/Artxfm.com to hear artists talk about their work on LVA's Artebella On The Radio.

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Pinball is a feature-length documentary and fictional narrative hybrid about a teenage Iraqi immigrant figuring out his life as he straddles the two worlds and cultures he embodies—the world from which he emigrated and his current life in Louisville.

The Hadley Prize will allow Chaubal and Silverman to travel to Egypt with the local teenager featured in Pinball, where they will document the teen’s first return visit to the place he identified as home before coming to America 10 years ago.

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Naveen Chaubal began making films while on a dramatic childhood family vacation amongst a forest in Michigan. Since then, he attended the USC School of Cinematic Arts and received the Thomas Bush Scholarship in Cinematography. Soon after graduating, he co-produced and co-shot “Tomorrow We Disappear,” a feature documentary about a displaced colony of traditional artists in India which premiered at the 2014 Tribeca Film Festival. He has worked for Mic.com, Vice News, Bon Appétit and produced music videos for James Blake and Frank Ocean. He has traveled the world directing and producing advertisements in the Middle East, Europe, and Central America. In 2012, Naveen went through Film Independent's Project Involve program. In 2015, he filmed a short documentary with Eric Garner’s family as they dealt with the aftermath of a senseless tragedy for AJ+. His recent short film "Pinball" screened at a Director's Guild showcase in Los Angeles, Syndicated Theater in Brooklyn, TIDE Festival, the Speed Art Museum, and the Kansas City Film Fest. "Pinball" the feature project, produced by Bryn Silverman, is a hybrid documentary fiction film and will paint a portrait of immigrant suburbia with Louisville as a lush backdrop.

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Bryn Silverman is an Oregon born Louisville based filmmaker whose work focuses on portraiture and people in both documentary and narrative film. She believes in entrepreneurship and seeing the world. She is a shorts screener for the Tribeca Film Festival. Most recently, she worked as a story-producer for a new Netflix series that will air in 2020.

PUBLIC Radio

LVA's Artebella On The Radio June 6, 2019

Tatiana Rathke & Keith McGill are two (out of 15) members of the 2019 Hadley Creatives Cohort, which will be presenting "Dis/comfort Zones" at Actors Theatre on June 8. Hear them talk all about it with Keith Waits Thursday morning at 10am on LVA's Artebella On The Radio. Tune in to WXOX 97.1 FM, or stream on Artxfm.com.

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The Community Foundation of Louisville presents the 2019 class of Hadley Creatives’ culminating project with a show on Saturday, June 8th, 2019 from 6-9 pm at Actors Theatre of Louisville. The 2019 Hadley Creatives class will present Dis/Comfort Zones: a journey into the sensations and politics of being, on Saturday, June 8th, 2019.

Tatiana Rathke is a visual artist and photographer who creates dream-like, colorful portraits and digital collages. Her work explores the beauty and drama of human beings and the natural world. 

 

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Keith McGill is a free-lance theatre teacher and workshop facilitator, an actor, and a stand-up comedianHe has a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Louisville.

The other members of the 2019 Hadley Creatives are Theresa Bautista, Andrew Cenci, William M.Duffy, Morgan Ecklund, Erica De La O, Eli Keel, Adrienne Miller, Irene Mudd, Brandon Ragland, Gibbs Rounsavall, Erica Cody-Rucker, Sanjay Saverimuttu, & Richard Sullivan.

Artist Support, Community, Events, Mural

Mary Alice Hadley Prize for Visual Art Winner Announced

The Community Foundation of Louisville, in partnership with Louisville Visual Art, is pleased to announce that Louisville-based multi-media artist  KCJ Szwedzinski  is the winner of the sixth annual Mary Alice Hadley Prize for Visual Art. The $5,000 award is an opportunity for local artists to enhance their careers through a targeted enrichment experience of their own design.  “My most recent body work has been on Jewish memory, identity and legacy," said Szwedzinski. "As an artist, I am continually mindful of who I intend as my audience. I question why it is important for me to make work about Judaism and how my work connects to contemporary issues.”  Szwedzinski will use the award to visit the Jewish Contemporary Museum and the Holocaust Center in San Francisco, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Archives in Washington, D.C., and the Genealogy Center in Fort Wayne, Indiana, as well as to take a course at the Rare Book School in Philadelphia.  "I believe that the act of remembering is a powerful tool in fostering empathy and breaking barriers of bias," Szwedzinski said. "It's important, now more than ever, to remind people that when true diversity is present in a community is when we all thrive."   Louisville Visual Art will honor KCJ Szwedzinski on Thursday, June 21, from 5:30-7:00 p.m. in their Portland gallery at 1538 Lytle Street, 40203. The reception is free and open to the public.     The $5,000 M.A. Hadley Prize is awarded from the George and Mary Alice Hadley Fund at the Community Foundation of Louisville. Focused on the arts and humanities, particularly visual arts, crafts, theater and the Louisville Free Public Library, the endowment has supported our community for more than 25 years.    The Hadley Prize winner is selected through a blind process by a diverse panel of arts professionals from Louisville and the surrounding area. The 2018 prize drew 40 applicants from the greater Louisville area, including Southern Indiana, whose work demonstrated mastery in ceramics, graphic design, drawing, crafts, painting, photography, sculpture, video, film and printmaking.  “Art soothes and calms our collective souls. Art causes us to question and to think. Through the years, art has been used to tell the story of those who came before. The work of KCJ Szwedzinski is powerful and will cause those who see her work to pause and reflect on this horrific period in our history,” said Louisville Visual Art's Executive Director, Lindy Casebier. “Louisville Visual Art is pleased to partner with the Community Foundation of Louisville in support of KCJ's growth as an artist and in turn share that personal growth with others in our community.”  Szwedzinski's itinerary has been designed to fuse personal history and artistic inspiration, "to synthesize seemingly disparate bodies of knowledge - archival practices for historical information and my personal inherited legacies."  “This experience will broaden my ability to make work that is rooted in my own Judaic heritage,” said Szwedzinski, “while facilitating engagement of a more universal audience.”    “It’s important for people to seek to find common ground and part of the way we do this is from remembering our collective history," said Susan Barry, President & CEO of the Community Foundation. "We are pleased the Hadley Prize will support an artist like KCJ, who is using art to begin difficult conversations around the Holocaust, one of the most tragic moments in our history."  The Community Foundation of Louisville believes that art is a vital part of a community where people and places thrive. The Hadley Prize is just one of the ways that the Community Foundation of Louisville supports local artists. Hadley Creatives is the Foundation's six-month comprehensive professional development program for working artists that recently celebrated its inaugural class with an exhibition that is running through July 1 at KMAC.

The Community Foundation of Louisville, in partnership with Louisville Visual Art, is pleased to announce that Louisville-based multi-media artist KCJ Szwedzinski is the winner of the sixth annual Mary Alice Hadley Prize for Visual Art. The $5,000 award is an opportunity for local artists to enhance their careers through a targeted enrichment experience of their own design.

“My most recent body work has been on Jewish memory, identity and legacy," said Szwedzinski. "As an artist, I am continually mindful of who I intend as my audience. I question why it is important for me to make work about Judaism and how my work connects to contemporary issues.”

Szwedzinski will use the award to visit the Jewish Contemporary Museum and the Holocaust Center in San Francisco, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Archives in Washington, D.C., and the Genealogy Center in Fort Wayne, Indiana, as well as to take a course at the Rare Book School in Philadelphia.

"I believe that the act of remembering is a powerful tool in fostering empathy and breaking barriers of bias," Szwedzinski said. "It's important, now more than ever, to remind people that when true diversity is present in a community is when we all thrive."

Louisville Visual Art will honor KCJ Szwedzinski on Thursday, June 21, from 5:30-7:00 p.m. in their Portland gallery at 1538 Lytle Street, 40203. The reception is free and open to the public.


The $5,000 M.A. Hadley Prize is awarded from the George and Mary Alice Hadley Fund at the Community Foundation of Louisville. Focused on the arts and humanities, particularly visual arts, crafts, theater and the Louisville Free Public Library, the endowment has supported our community for more than 25 years.

The Hadley Prize winner is selected through a blind process by a diverse panel of arts professionals from Louisville and the surrounding area. The 2018 prize drew 40 applicants from the greater Louisville area, including Southern Indiana, whose work demonstrated mastery in ceramics, graphic design, drawing, crafts, painting, photography, sculpture, video, film and printmaking.

“Art soothes and calms our collective souls. Art causes us to question and to think. Through the years, art has been used to tell the story of those who came before. The work of KCJ Szwedzinski is powerful and will cause those who see her work to pause and reflect on this horrific period in our history,” said Louisville Visual Art's Executive Director, Lindy Casebier. “Louisville Visual Art is pleased to partner with the Community Foundation of Louisville in support of KCJ's growth as an artist and in turn share that personal growth with others in our community.”

Szwedzinski's itinerary has been designed to fuse personal history and artistic inspiration, "to synthesize seemingly disparate bodies of knowledge - archival practices for historical information and my personal inherited legacies."

“This experience will broaden my ability to make work that is rooted in my own Judaic heritage,” said Szwedzinski, “while facilitating engagement of a more universal audience.”


“It’s important for people to seek to find common ground and part of the way we do this is from remembering our collective history," said Susan Barry, President & CEO of the Community Foundation. "We are pleased the Hadley Prize will support an artist like KCJ, who is using art to begin difficult conversations around the Holocaust, one of the most tragic moments in our history."

The Community Foundation of Louisville believes that art is a vital part of a community where people and places thrive. The Hadley Prize is just one of the ways that the Community Foundation of Louisville supports local artists. Hadley Creatives is the Foundation's six-month comprehensive professional development program for working artists that recently celebrated its inaugural class with an exhibition that is running through July 1 at KMAC.

PUBLIC Radio

LVA's Artebella On The Radio 5.31.18

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C.J. Pressma opened a new show at PYRO Gallery May 31, Steve Heine just installed a new piece at the new AC Hotel in NuLu, and Printmaker Elizabeth Foley is a member of the inaugural class for Hadley Creatives through the Community Foundation of Louisville, which opened an exhibit at KMAC June 1.Tune in WXOX 97.1 FM/Artxfm.com every Thursday at 10am for LVA's Artebella On the Radio, hosted by Keith Waits.

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PUBLIC Radio

LVA's Artebella On The Radio 3.15.18

Ramona Lindsey

Ramona Lindsey

Ramona Lindsey from Community Foundation of Louisville and Susanna Crum from Indiana University Southeast came to the WXOX 97.1 FM studio to talk about the 2018 Hadley Prize for Visual Art. In 2013, Susanna was the 1st recipient of the prize, and the discussion focused on what makes for a competitive application for grants such as this.

Application opens March16
at www.louisvillevisualart.org/hadley

 

Susanna Crum

Susanna Crum

 

There will be an informational session for the Hadley Prize with 

Community Foundation of Louisville & LVA
Saturday, March 17th, 2018
South Central Regional Library
7300 Jefferson Blvd, Louisville, KY
10:00-11:30 AM

Learn about the prize criteria and tips for writing competitive grants!

 

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Events, Artist Support

Fischer Prize 2018 reception

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LVA partnered with the Community Foundation of Louisville in congratulating Elizabeth Hardy, the inaugural winner of the  Bill Fischer Award for Visual Art ! The celebration was held at the Tim Faulkner Gallery, located across the street from LVA's office in Portland.  Hardy plans to use her prize money "to provide a suitable environment with tools to establish a space to be able to create works on a larger scale than I am physically capable of doing with the restrictions of my current studio space. I could expand my practice for my own productions as well as have a proper venue to function as a learning environment that I could share the techniques I have learned with others."

LVA partnered with the Community Foundation of Louisville in congratulating Elizabeth Hardy, the inaugural winner of the Bill Fischer Award for Visual Art! The celebration was held at the Tim Faulkner Gallery, located across the street from LVA's office in Portland.

Hardy plans to use her prize money "to provide a suitable environment with tools to establish a space to be able to create works on a larger scale than I am physically capable of doing with the restrictions of my current studio space. I could expand my practice for my own productions as well as have a proper venue to function as a learning environment that I could share the techniques I have learned with others."

PUBLIC Radio

LVA's Artebella On The Radio 01.04.18

For our first show of 2018, we talked with three of the Hadley Creatives: Printmaker Brianna Harlan, Glass Artist Devin French, & Performance Artist Cynthia Norton. Anne McKune of Community Foundation of Louisville joined us to explain this new program. Join us every Thursday at 10am on WXOX 97.1 FM

Developed in partnership with Creative Capital, a New York-based nonprofit that supports innovative and adventurous artists across the country, Hadley Creatives is a 6-month learning and engagement experience for local artists who are at a pivotal point in their careers.  Through a competitive application process, we selected fifteen artists who demonstrated a strong creative vision and a readiness to pursue or extend their career as a working artist. The six-month program will help the selected local artists build their professional practice, cultivate an expanded peer network and dedicate time for reflection and planning.

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Artist Support

The 5th Annual Mary Alice Hadley Prize for Visual Art

Adrienne Miller   The  Community Foundation of Louisville , in partnership with Louisville Visual Art, presented Louisville-based artist and printmaker  Adrienne Miller  with the fifth annual Mary Alice Hadley Prize for Visual Art today at 10 a.m.  The $5,000 award is an opportunity for local artists to enhance their careers through a targeted enrichment experience. Miller will use the prize to research the landscape and art historical influence of the Four Corners area of the American Southwest. The two-week trip will cover close to 2,000 miles in a loop through the Four Corners region and will include a variety of stops, including several different pueblo ruin sites, printmaking studios in Albuquerque, the Georgia O’Keefe museum and archives, several National Parks, energy vortexes in Sedona, and several large earthworks in the region.  “I want the experience to be transformative and immersive so that I come away feeling as though the experience really was a tipping point for me,” said Miller of the Hadley Prize enrichment experience. “I want to return to Louisville renewed to create a whole new body of work.”

Adrienne Miller

The Community Foundation of Louisville, in partnership with Louisville Visual Art, presented Louisville-based artist and printmaker Adrienne Miller with the fifth annual Mary Alice Hadley Prize for Visual Art today at 10 a.m.

The $5,000 award is an opportunity for local artists to enhance their careers through a targeted enrichment experience. Miller will use the prize to research the landscape and art historical influence of the Four Corners area of the American Southwest. The two-week trip will cover close to 2,000 miles in a loop through the Four Corners region and will include a variety of stops, including several different pueblo ruin sites, printmaking studios in Albuquerque, the Georgia O’Keefe museum and archives, several National Parks, energy vortexes in Sedona, and several large earthworks in the region.

“I want the experience to be transformative and immersive so that I come away feeling as though the experience really was a tipping point for me,” said Miller of the Hadley Prize enrichment experience. “I want to return to Louisville renewed to create a whole new body of work.”

Adrienne Miller, Susan Barry   “The selection committee was very impressed with Adrienne’s clear artistic vision and the unique nature of her enrichment experience,” said LVA director Lindy Casebier. “Her focus on landscape, both as a part of the American identity and as a driver of her own work, really stood out.”  “The local artists competing for the Hadley Prize continue to impress us with their originality and passion,” said Susan Barry, President and CEO of the Community Foundation of Louisville. “While this award focuses on a single artist and a single project, it has the potential to make a much greater impact. By helping Adrienne develop professionally to realize her full potential, she will be empowered to share her gifts with other artists and the Louisville community.”

Adrienne Miller, Susan Barry

“The selection committee was very impressed with Adrienne’s clear artistic vision and the unique nature of her enrichment experience,” said LVA director Lindy Casebier. “Her focus on landscape, both as a part of the American identity and as a driver of her own work, really stood out.”

“The local artists competing for the Hadley Prize continue to impress us with their originality and passion,” said Susan Barry, President and CEO of the Community Foundation of Louisville. “While this award focuses on a single artist and a single project, it has the potential to make a much greater impact. By helping Adrienne develop professionally to realize her full potential, she will be empowered to share her gifts with other artists and the Louisville community.”

Brad Vetter, Adrienne Miller, Susan Barry, Lindy Casebier

Brad Vetter, Adrienne Miller, Susan Barry, Lindy Casebier