Member Monday

Member Monday

Member Monday: Tiffany Carbonneau

What does LVA add to your life?

Internship possibilities for my students, exhibitions that enrich the community, classes that enrich the community.

Describe your perfect Sunday afternoon.

Cooking a delicious meal.

Who is your favorite local artist?

Too many good ones: some of my favorites: Mary Carothers, Debra Clem, Emily Sheehan, Susanna Crum

Where would you like to see Louisville 10 years from now?

Less racially and economically segregated, more openness and acceptance of Southern Indiana as part of the Louisville community. It is a social divide that dates back to the civil war era, let’s move on and live and work together as the one community that we are. More public transportation, More creative industry, more private, local, state, and federal funds for the arts that are democratically allocated.

What neighborhood do you live in? What are some of your favorite things about it?

 I live close to downtown New Albany.  I absolutely love that my neighborhood is economically and racially diverse, that I can afford a beautiful historical home, that I can ride my bike/walk just a few blocks and be at the waterfront or at so many great, locally owned shops and restaurants, and our great farmers’ market. 

What three items would you bring to a desert island?

My dogs, Crunch and Oliver, a water filter, and a really sharp knife, wait maybe that’s four.

What advice would you give your past self if you could?

Don’t expect the world to get better as you grow older, you have to work make it better.  People are fragile.  Gender Bias is alive and well and comes at you from unexpected places, don’t let that get you down, use the economic and educational privileges you have enjoyed to work for equality for all.

 

Member Monday

Member Monday: Andy Cozzens

How did you first get involved with LVA?

I volunteered in high school as an intern to Lisa Work. After returning from graduate school, I joined the membership committee and started an artist organization that worked alongside LVA.

 When did you first know that art was going to be a big part of your life?

I had a feeling at a very young age, my interest grew throughout high school, and I knew it was exactly what I wanted to do after my first semester in college.

What does LVA add to your life?

A sense of community within the art scene of Louisville. A springboard for launching new initiatives to improve the lives of artists, and thus improving the city of Louisville. 

How else are you involved in the community?

I live in Louisville. I teach Interdisciplinary Sculpture at KyCAD. I exhibit my work around Louisville. I volunteer on the Board at LVA. I often involve myself in programs that benefit artists and arts education. I am currently developing artwork to benefit health outcomes within the Smoketown Neighborhood through Project HEAL. I am collaborating with the Louisville Ballet. 

Describe your perfect Sunday afternoon.

Wake up. Coffee. Read the newspaper. More coffee. Into the studio. Feed myself. Go Bowling. Eat dinner. Relax and reflect on the day. Bourbon. Sleep.

Who is your favorite local artist?

Carlos Gamez de Francisco

Where would you like to see Louisville 10 years from now?

I would like to see a city that artists want to live in. A city that supports their artists and values them as a necessary component of the city. The arts give the city it’s flavor- artists create the art- if you don’t support the artists- your city will be flavorless. I would like to see Louisville understand this within the next 10 years. 

What neighborhood do you live in? What are some of your favorite things about it?

I currently live in Portland. I love the proximity to downtown and living on the river.

What three items would you bring to a desert island?

Sketchbook. Pen. Knife.

What advice would you give your past self if you could?

Read more.

Member Monday

Member Monday: Beth Holladay

How did you first get involved with LVA?

As a high school art teacher at the Academy at Shawnee, I worked with LVA and Ehren Reed on a Kentucky Fund for the Art's grant funded Open Doors Honor Quilt Project inspired by Judy Chicago’s International Honor Quilt.

 When did you first know that art was going to be a big part of your life?

In elementary school I wanted to be an author/illustrator, later I wanted to be a photographer, and in college, I finally discovered the field of graphic design. I was lucky enough to have a fantastic professor, Angela Lee, that grounded that design education in studio art practice, and I knew it was the field for me. It wasn’t until years later, though, that I decided to attend graduate school to study art education.

It took me (what felt like) a very long time to really grasp my role as an artist, but that became much clearer when combined with my desire to teach.

 What does LVA add to your life?

LVA provides artist connections, support, teaching opportunities, and most importantly, opportunities for my students through programs like Studio 2000 and Children’s Fine Art Classes (CFAC). I see LVA as a critical driving force of connection, camaraderie and momentum in the growing Louisville art scene. LVA makes me feel hopeful about the future of the arts in our city.

How else are you involved in the community?

I’m a mentor with Big Brothers, Big Sisters. My little, Julia, is a high school student who inspires me as an artist and as an educator, and BB/BS has given us many opportunities to get engaged in our community together.

I’m also a proud volunteer at Girls Rock Louisville, who aims to empower girls and gender­ non-conforming youth from all backgrounds by exploring music creation in a supportive, inclusive environment. At their summer camps, I’ve taught campers to create their own band logos and how to screen print their own t-shirts.

Describe your perfect Sunday afternoon.

I’d love to have a meaningful talk with friends over a meal, do some exploring, make a few photographs, and hear live music.

Who is your favorite local artist?

So many favorites! Illustrator Robby Davis, Photographer and Installation artist Mary Carothers, assemblage artist Caroline Waite, painter Ericka Jeffries and painter Gaela Irwin, and photographer Sarah Lyon.

Where would you like to see Louisville 10 years from now?

Making progress in intentionally confronting and dismantling barriers to equity and social justice - addressing our housing and public school crisis. Empowering and celebrating underserved communities through the Mural Arts Project. Improving public transportation. Reinforcing our declaration of Sanctuary city status through profound supports for immigrants and refugees. Supporting LGBTQ people.

Beth and her students, courtesy of Beth Holladay

Beth and her students, courtesy of Beth Holladay

What neighborhood do you live in? What are some of your favorite things about it?

I live in Schnitzelberg. I love being able to walk to Nord’s Bakery, Sunergos Coffee, Zanzabar and Dairy Del. I also love living in a connected community with a lot of fascinating history and close access to downtown.

What three items would you bring to a desert island?

A luxurious treehouse, a boat, and a massive sketchbook.

What advice would you give your past self if you could?

Travel as much as possible, take time to slow down and meaningfully reflect, dream big for the future.

Member Monday

Member Monday: Open Studio Weekend Artist Petersen Thomas

How did you first get involved with LVA?

I honestly do not recall.  LVA seems to be woven into the fabric of the visual arts in Louisville. I probably joined as a function of donating to a fundraiser.  

When did you first know that art was going to be a big part of your life?

I think this question has it backwards.  Children seem to have an innate desire to create images.  Like most kids, I could amuse myself endlessly by drawing. Those drawings evolved from scribbles to animals to cars to figures to portraits and back to scribbles.  At some point, probably in high school, I realized that art was never going to stop being a big part of my life.

What does LVA add to your life?

So many things: a framework for collaborative projects; opportunities to interact with patrons and the public (Open Studio Weekend!); the ability to give back through fundraising efforts that support worthy art projects (Open Studio Weekend!); and generally a feeling of being part of a larger community.

How else are you involved in the community?

I do my part to uphold the image of us as a bourbon soaked people.  And Forecastle.

Describe your perfect Sunday afternoon.

Being abducted by a race of space aliens who are fascinated by human creativity, and to study the phenomena, they put me in a clean well-lighted space with unlimited food and art supplies to observe me making all the art I possibly can until they get enough data for their study at which point they time warp me back to where and when I was. And then I get up, have a cup of coffee and work on the NYT crossword puzzle.

Who is your favorite local artist?

Bobby Benjamin

Where would you like to see Louisville 10 years from now?

38°13.52′N 85°44.5′W

What neighborhood do you live in? What are some of your favorite things about it?

Downtown.  I love the proximity to the bike trails along the river, Waterfront Park and NULU.

What three items would you bring to a desert island?

A fire extinguisher, a brick on a string, and some big warm blankets.

What advice would you give your past self if you could?

Don’t confuse punctuality with integrity.

Member Monday

Member Monday: Open Studio Weekend Artist Jenny Zeller

How did you first get involved with LVA? 

Joining LVA was one of the first things I did upon my return to Louisville in 2011. I first showed my work in Louisville that winter at LVA, for the Month of Makers exhibition in conjunction with Makers Mark.

When did you first know that art was going to be a big part of your life?

I was a bit of a late bloomer when it came to art.   I didn’t connect with a particular medium until my last semester at University of Kentucky when I took my first photography class.  It was my first job out of college at the Haitian Art Company in Key West that solidified my life with art!

What does LVA add to your life?

LVA has been a huge source of support to me for many years.  They have promoted and exhibited my work, and provided teaching opportunities to me.  LVA continually educates and inspires me with the introduction of new artists, concepts, and ideas.  I love my weekly sessions with Artebella and PUBLIC radio! 

How else are you involved in the community? 

Currently I’m working with the Louisville Photo Biennial, teaching photography classes at underserved community centers throughout the Louisville Metro area.  I am also a fixture in the local yoga community.

Describe your perfect Sunday afternoon.

My perfect afternoon contains little yoga, a lot of cooking with my NPR Sunday shows in the background, some quality time outdoors as well as with my stack of library books. The day would end watching a film that I think about the next day!

Who is your favorite local artist?

I love the work of collage and assemblage artist Caroline Waite.

Where would you like to see Louisville 10 years from now?

I would like to see Louisville competing on a national level for creative, artistic, and entrepreneurial opportunities. 

What neighborhood do you live in? What are some of your favorite things about it?

I live in Irish Hill.  It’s a quick bike ride to most places I want to be in the city.  While the area is in a constant state of transition, many of my neighbors have lived in Irish Hill for 30/40 + years!

What three items would you bring to a desert island? 

A rain barrel, lacinato kale seeds and my citrus press.

What advice would you give your past self if you could? 

Trust your intuition.

Member Monday

Member Monday: Open Studio Weekend Artist Phillip High

How did you first get involved with LVA? 

I attended an Artebella pre-launch feedback meeting and signed up when it first came online.

When did you first know that art was going to be a big part of your life?

I have always enjoyed art related activities, but In the 4th grade, one of my classmate's mother was an artist and gave a guest drawing lesson to the class. The process felt very natural to me and I received a lot of positive feedback from the results.

What does LVA add to your life? 

Just knowing there is an organization dedicated to promoting local art and artists is very encouraging. Artebella, Open Studio Weekend, and the Artist Opportunities email newsletter have been specifically helpful to me. 

How else are you involved in the community?

Mainly through arts related activities: attending openings and events and actively networking with other artists.

Describe your perfect Sunday afternoon.

I am in my studio all day, six days a week and I like for Sundays to be intentional down-time, with as light an agenda as possible. Being outdoors and time with family are always good. A clear break from "accomplishing" anything helps me to be more motivated throughout the rest of the week.

Who is your favorite local artist?

This is difficult to answer. I have only been back in Louisville since 2012 and I feel like I am still discovering new artists all the time. I honestly cannot pick a favorite at this point. There are many to choose from. 

Where would you like to see Louisville 10 years from now?

I believe Louisville is headed in a great direction right now. Some things I am looking forward to are: The Waterfront Botanical Gardens, the revitalization of urban communities, greater national recognition for our commitment to creativity and healthy growth, and an increasingly diverse and inclusive cultural mix.

What neighborhood do you live in? What are some of your favorite things about it?

I live in Hikes Point, a well maintained and convenient location. I am pleased to see many young couples and families moving in on a regular basis. I also like the surprising amount of cultural, racial, and economic diversity happily coexisting there.

What three items would you bring to a desert island?

Water, an umbrella... and a prayer rug.

What advice would you give your past self if you could?

Focus, plan, act.

Member Monday

Member Monday: Open Studio Weekend Artist Rebecca Norton

How did you first get involved with LVA?

I signed up for LVA newsletters when I moved back to Louisville. 

When did you first know that art was going to be a big part of your life?

I was attending shows and exhibitions shortly after starting my undergraduate studies at U of L in 1999. Art was what I did - it permeated my social, academic and private life. There was no one moment when I knew it was going to be a big part of my life. It just was. 

What does LVA add to your life?

Keeps me informed about artists and events in my community.

How else are you involved in the community?

I spend my free time at First Build making things and sharing ideas with other makers. 

Describe your perfect Sunday afternoon. 

A banana split followed by a walk in Cherokee Park with my family. 

Who is your favorite local artist?

Nico Jorcino

Where would you like to see Louisville 10 years from now?

More pedestrians and sidewalk culture.

What neighborhood do you live in? What are some of your favorite things about it?

Crescent Hill. The Crescent Hill Reservoir and Gatehouse, Blue Dog Bakery, Craft House, and the sounds of trains in late evening and night. 

What three items would you bring to a desert island? 

A book on classical and modern geometry—written in at least three languages and laminated, a mason jar (for its many uses— cup to capture water condensation for drinking, instrument to make sounds with different objects or water filled inside…), and a knife.

What advice would you give your past self if you could?

You'll have several opportunities to stop and see the Grand Canyon while driving to and from Los Angeles. Take advantage and spend a night under it's stars - its something I never did but wish I had. 

Member Monday

Member Monday Feature: Ashley Brossart

OSW2015_Day1-86.jpg

How did you first get involved with LVA?
I was first involved with LVA through Children's Fine Art Classes in middle school. What an incredible opportunity! My classes were at Spalding University - it was pretty motivating to be working in a college classroom as a youth. 

When did you first know that art was going to be a big part of your life?
I knew it was a big part of my life then as a middle school student. I designed and painted some murals with my Girl Scout troop. The high school I attended, sacred Heart Academy in Louisville, offered an incredible art program - International Baccalaureate program. Art has always been a huge part of my life. It wasn't until I finished undergrad I really decided to start making art my career and making decisions that allowed me to invest the majority  of my time into my art and create and develop a business from it. 

What does LVA add to your life?
LVA adds an art community that I know is there for support. And now it is the new location for my studio! 

How else are you involved in the community? 
I do live painting events that allow further engagement with the community. I also have an ongoing project where I leave art throughout the city. It's more of a passive involvement but a way to create a catalyst for thought about our built environment. I am a 2016 graduate of Center for Neighborhood's Neighborhood Institute. Murals have been my goal for awhile and that is finally gaining momentum. I have completed a few interior murals for the Kroger Company through LVA and will have some other larger outdoor projects coming up in the future. 

Describe your perfect Sunday afternoon.
Sundays are definitely my day I set aside for myself. Sometimes I'm still doing studio work through Sunday. I would say perfect Sunday after noon follows a solid week of art making maybe brief time in studio with trying some new things just to see what will happen. Check out a restaurant  or cook and sit on patio... Followed by a long bike ride towards the waterfront hoping it has finally turned into a beach and then back to my couch! 

Who is your favorite local artist?
Andrew Cozzens. It's always really difficult to pick one but his name popped up first today. 

Where would you like to see Louisville 10 years from now?
 A Light rail system! Encouraging a distinct break from the dependence on automobiles for transit.  A thriving public art program with a significant impact and destination point for the community and visitors. An urban core with significantly increased density with many people living closer to downtown. More jobs attracting the creative class from larger cities. Galleries and art groups extending their reach to nationally increasing a contemporary art presence. More education about the importance of art in our communities.

What neighborhood do you live in? 
I finally live in the Original Highlands. I think it's the best neighborhood in the city right now and have always wanted to live there. 


What are some of your favorite things about it?
I can walk and bike to locations that define Louisville. As well as significant architecture that depicts history and sense of place for the city. 

What advice would you give your past self if you could? 
It all works out, trust yourself. Do what you want to do and go where you want to go.

Member Monday

Member Monday: Shohei Katayama

When did you first know that art was going to be a big part of your life?

Maybe after dropping my math / psychology major for sculpture.  Although now, I believe that any subject's zenith is great art.

What does LVA add to your life?

A sense of community and love. <3

How else are you involved in the community?

I run a small gallery called "ThinkBox Contemporary".  It's an experimental art venue that functions as a residential project space, evolved from an interest in exploring the relationship between people, their environments, and the community.  As a practice for urban regeneration, the development was initiated in the heart of Old Louisville. The venue was completed in late 2013 through the collaborative support and effort of locals, to increase dialogue for the betterment of the area’s social discourse and to provide a location that acts as a catalyst for spreading ideas. Local artist / educator at KYCAD, Andrew Cozzens (I think... now a board member at LVA?) has helped with inviting national to international artists to broaden the scope. Hopefully someone will continue it after I leave.  

Describe your perfect Sunday afternoon.

Mimosa at Wild Eggs, trail hiking and cycling at Bernheim Forest, napping at Cherokee park, lunch at Kashmir, playing the piano with a giant jug of espresso. Ah, so many things I love to do and so little time.  

Who is your favorite local artist?

Hmmmmmmm. They're all my favorites. 

Where would you like to see Louisville 10 years from now?

That'll be about half way into the Move Louisville plan...so an efficient public transportation. Google'll be nice. More art critics! 

What neighborhood do you live in? What are some of your favorite things about it?

Old Louisville! The affordable and beautiful neighborhood, where law enforcers frequently leaves me a letter encased in a green envelope on my windshield.

What three items would you bring to a desert island?

Multitool survival kit, fishing rod, and a bottle of Pappy 23yr.

What advice would you give your past self if you could?

"If you truly love something, don't tell anyone." 


Shohei Katayama is a Japanese American artist living and working in Louisville, Kentucky. His work includes line drawings, sculpture and conceptual installation art. He received a B.A. in Studio Art from Bellarmine University (2010) and undertook additional training in glass blowing with Ché Rhodes at the University of Louisville.

In 2012, Katayama served as the artist-in-residence at the Asia Institute – Crane House and he continues to be an active leader in Asian culture education in the community. He is a former preparator at Land of Tomorrow gallery and currently an Associate Member at Pyro Gallery. 

Katayama’s work has been shown extensively in local and regional venues, from Pyro Gallery (2011-2013) and Land of Tomorrow (Lexington, 2013) to the Crane House (2012, 2013, 2016), The Brew House (Pittsburgh, 2014), and the Local Speed exhibition at the Speed Art Museum (2013).

www.shoheikatayama.com

www.facebook.com/thinkboxcontemporary

Member Monday

Member Monday: Elizabeth Richter

How did you first get involved with LVA?


I joined LVA about five years ago when I was teaching elementary art and searching for ways to get involved in the art community in Louisville. Becoming a member of LVA was a first great step for me as a young artist, new to the city.

Liz Richter works with elementary school students at the Hikes Point Mural through Center for Neighborhoods' PAINT program.

Liz Richter works with elementary school students at the Hikes Point Mural through Center for Neighborhoods' PAINT program.

When did you first know that art was going to be a big part of your life?

Art has always been a big part of my life, but probably in middle school or high school I began realizing that my love for art and natural inclination for it was special and would be something I would want to do in some capacity for the rest of my life.  I started college as an advertising major before discovering my love for teaching and switching to art education.  As a former homeschool student, I have always been primarily self taught.

What does LVA add to your life?

LVA is a support system, a community of innovators, a resource for opportunities, host for great parties and exhibitions, and a way to give back and lend support to young people in the city that are talented and passionate about visual art.   I am so grateful for the support LVA has lent on my current mural project.

Liz Richter with LVA interns Michelle Montgomery and Zara Goldberg.

Liz Richter with LVA interns Michelle Montgomery and Zara Goldberg.

How are you involved in the community?

I like to engage the public in my work and introduce them to art in different contexts. Whether it's a wearable art piece for a fashion show, a mural, or a live painting for a festival, sharing beauty and inspiring others in the joy of making is all I want in life. Because of what art meant to me as a child, I am also a passionate advocate for arts education and like to do projects that uniquely engage young people and draw attention to them and what can be accomplished with mentorship and nurturing talent.


Describe your perfect Sunday afternoon.

Right now, because I have a new baby and am pretty much always in paint-covered overalls working on a mural in Hikes Point, a perfect Sunday afternoon would be taking a long shower, donning a cute dress and spending a few hours sketching and reflecting in beautiful solitude at the new Speed museum, then meeting up with my little family for a sunset walk on Frankfort Avenue (with maybe some coffee or ice cream).

Liz Richter works with elementary school students at the Hikes Point Mural  &nbsp;through Center for Neighborhoods' PAINT program.

Liz Richter works with elementary school students at the Hikes Point Mural through Center for Neighborhoods' PAINT program.

Who is your favorite local artist?

I could never pick just one! Folk artist Marvin Finn has a place in my heart from teaching about his work to children in the local schools. Other inspirations include Kathleen Lolley, Bryan Patrick Todd, John Whitesell, Julio Cesar and my beautiful and talented friend Bri Bowers! All of my fellow artists who show work at Revelry Boutique and Gallery motivate me to elevate my work as well.

Where would you like to see Louisville 10 years from now?

I’d like to see the art scene growing to new heights.  I believe it starts with enriching arts opportunities to school age children and encouraging the next generation of artists by bringing back art classes in every school!  I’d like to see more galleries and boutiques with local artwork, thriving; and the quality of work continuing to be elevated; where we are capturing the attention of the world.  I’d love to see more murals/street art and a developed program to utilize young and emerging artists in public art projects.  We need more opportunities for artists to engage the public and show their abilities.  We also need more art patrons; individuals who will purchase works of art and support young talent.  I am excited about what is happening in the Louisville art scene right now and look forward to seeing the development in the next ten years.

Liz Richter (center) with LVA interns Michelle Montgomery (left)&nbsp;and Zara Goldberg (right)&nbsp;

Liz Richter (center) with LVA interns Michelle Montgomery (left) and Zara Goldberg (right) 

What neighborhood do you live in? What are some of your favorite things about it?

I live in the Clifton neighborhood.  It’s the perfect location for a young  family because we can walk everywhere; including some of the best restaurants and coffee shops in town.  I love that we are just minutes away from Nulu, downtown and the Highlands yet still get to feel like we are tucked away from the city traffic.  I am constantly discovering other creatives or artistic ventures popping up in my neighborhood.

What advice would you give your past self if you could?

I grew up in a rural community without any resources or opportunities in the arts, so I would tell myself to dream bigger and to not be afraid to go 100% for what I really wanted to do from the start.  I would also tell myself to take a great big chill pill.

Member Monday

Member Monday: Annette Cable

How did you first get involved with LVA?  

My husband, Mark and I are both artists, we joined years ago. Our daughter, Izzy, is a CFAC alumni. And both my husband and I have taught summer camps and classes for LVA, me for many years

When did you first know that art was going to be a big part of your life?

When I started elementary school, always with the teacher’s bulletin boards, posters for school events, elaborately decorating my folders with scenes from plays, 4-H projects and homework were always artfully oriented. It started when I was little.  

What does LVA add to your life?

A community of artists, creatives who are also business minded. A community of creative, silly, youthful students to help keep me young at heart. Great opportunities to expand my teaching and illustration career.  

How else are you involved in the community?

I work for a lot of educational institutions, the Portland Museum, Riverside the Farnsley-Mormen Landing, the Carnegie Center for Art and History, coming up with all kinds of creative and history based art projects. Teaching people to be creative in all aspects of life, that’s how I like to be involved.

Describe your perfect Sunday afternoon.

In my little tiny garden and yard, listening to birds and the wind, and neighbors in the distance. Listening to life. Digging in the dirt, playing with color and lots of shade

Who is your favorite local artist?

Julia Comer, jewelry designer and artist. I’ve worked with Julia in many capacities, shared a studio, been a shop girl in her gallery, learned more patience and more tenacity, quality of craft and goodness from her, to push myself through her excellence, creativity and perseverance.

Where would you like to see Louisville 10 years from now?

I would like to see a more positive, peaceful place, brought on by working together, communicating thoughtfully and rationally, and more and better education. People paying attention to each other, nature, our environment. People unplugged! Beauty - art, music, dance and poetry surrounding us and helping to answer problems.

What neighborhood do you live in? What are some of your favorite things about it?

I live in a little house in the Highlands. A little house on a little street, we can walk, ride bikes to dinner or the grocery or the green parks or to visit with friends and neighbors. Big old trees and gardens, red-tailed hawks soaring between the trees, families and doggies everywhere. People young and old, mixed together, living everyday together!

What advice would you give your past self if you could?

Get your masters in education and business!!! A freelance career gives you a lot of freedom but not a lot of stability, it would be nice to have more choices in job opportunities. Be in the now, and start a retirement plan now. Keep a small, sunny place in the country. Be happy, create, use your mind and don’t stop exercising your mind and your body!

Member Monday

Member Monday: LaNia Roberts

Photo by Sarah Katherine Davis for LVA

Photo by Sarah Katherine Davis for LVA

How did you first get involved with LVA?

In my art class at Central High School, my art teacher, Mr. Patrick Robertson noticed my strong interest in art, and suggested that I go apply to be in LVA's CFAC classes! I applied, and got in. It was amazing, and from there, my art and my life truly began to thrive. 

When did you first know that art was going to be a big part of your life?

I believe it was the day I graduated from Governor School for the Arts. The experience was so great for me, it was almost like a dream. I began the road of finding my true self there. After graduation, and winning an award, I realized that the only thing that had brought me to that wonderful experience was Art and God. I consider both to be one. And when I left GSA, I knew for a fact that I couldn't go anywhere or do anything without it. 

What does LVA add to your life?

LVA has given so much to my life. Really, I wouldn't be wherever I am, or wherever I will be, without the love that was given by LVA to me. LVA has and always will add support, love, and family to my life. LVA is definitely apart of my Art Family—-people I love that give support that have came into my life because of Art. 

Photo by Sarah Katherine Davis Photography

Photo by Sarah Katherine Davis Photography

Describe your perfect Sunday afternoon.

Since I am in college, there is something that is always due, a meeting to always attend, a class to always go to. My perfect Sunday is a day where I get a full 8 hours of sleep the night before, I wake up around 10am, go for a run, shower, and then go straight to the studio. I paint solely on a personal piece since I magically have no homework for however many hours needed to get to a point in which I am happy with the creation. I then magically have no meetings to attend, and since it is also spring, it is sunny, dry, and 75 degrees— the perfect weather in which to lay out in the grass and read on the Quad. As I read, I see a few buddies walking past and have nice conversations with them all. Reading-talking-reading-talking. Afterwards, when it begins to get dark, I will get up and go back to my studio and work on anything further that will enhance my journey of personal growth (research watching a documentary, learning something new, etc.). At around 9-10pm, I will get up and go back home, order Wings over Syracuse and choose a book or movie to loose myself in. I will then eat, and go to sleep by 11pm to rise early the next morning. Now, THAT is a perfect Sunday!!! Lol! 

Who is your favorite local artist?

Kevlen Goodner, a freelance illustrator, is definitely my favorite local artist. Besides him being purely amazing, his soul, like his art, is full of beauty, love, and knowledge. He is a friend of my dad, but ever since he has seen my art, he has been an extreme supporter—a very precious gift I did not know how to hold while I was younger! He has helped me a lot in the past, and every action he seems to take inspires me in ways I can not explain! With his character personally, and as an artist. I only have love for Mr. Kevlen!  

Provided by LaNia Roberts

Provided by LaNia Roberts

Provided by LaNia Roberts

Provided by LaNia Roberts

Where would you like to see Louisville 10 years from now?

I would like to see Louisville with more jobs, higher minimum wage, more art, and more available resources for children needing a creative outlet. Especially for the children that don't have parents that can mentally or financially support their artistic journey. 

What neighborhood do you live in? What are some of your favorite things about it?

I grew up in the West End and Beuchel. When I left for college, my family moved to Shivley. So I've lived in a couple of different areas here in Louisville. I must say that my favorite thing about any of them is the amount of access I have to different things. Busses, stores, centers, anything. Being in three different areas with three different amounts of access really showed me how segregated simple access is to human beings.  

What advice would you give your past self if you could?

Essentially, none. But something that would have put a bit less stress on my back would be to not compare myself and my journey to others. I did a lot of comparing, and feeling bad about myself and my place in life while I was younger. If I had known what life had in store for me, I would have realized that even my laziest days were leading up to a success and love filled life.

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Member Monday

Member Monday: Sunny Ra

How did you first get involved with LVA?

I believe when I became a member in 2012 and applied for Artebella, and that trickled into being an instructor in the Open Doors Holiday Program.  Since then, I've had a solo show at PUBLIC and am an instructor at the Academy.

When did you first know that art was going to be a big part of your life?  

During my 1st year of undergrad - I was at school where studio art was not really happening and so because I was not able to create art, I became very unhappy and depressed.  It was at the point that I realized how much art was an integral part of me.

What does LVA add to your life?

 LVA adds a community of artists and a way to connect with other artist and educators to my life.  For this reason, I am able to participate in arts opportunities all over the city. 

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How else are you involved in the community?

I work in the Arts in Healing program at the Kentucky Center for the Performing Art where we pair artists with healthcare facilities around the city.  We help people heal through the arts in all forms, visual art, music, poetry and drama.  I get to attend many of these sessions and take part in the art process with patients and their healing. I am also a Louisville Ultimate Frisbee member for whatever that's worth!  It's so much fun and I get to meet people from all backgrounds and professions.

Describe your perfect Sunday afternoon.

Drinking some coffee on a beach!

Who is your favorite local artist?

Douglas Miller, his drawings are beautiful!

Where would you like to see Louisville 10 years from now?

I would like to see Louisville become more diverse both in the arts and in general: a richer diversity in art forms, more galleries, less bars/drinking place and more cultural establishments like museums (photography, history, etc) and maybe that will bring jobs other than healthcare and factory work.  I would also love to see the city more united so that there isn't such a disparity with city life and suburb life.    

What neighborhood do you live in? What are some of your favorite things about it?

I live around the Brownsboro/Lyndon lane area.  I like that it's green, safe/quiet and near my studio.  This is the first time I've had an apartment in a nice/safe area and I love it!  It's also nice that I can run all my errands within a few miles.

What three items would you bring to a desert island?

A knife, my glasses - I'm blind without it! - and a comfy blanket!

What advice would you give your past self if you could?

I would say be even more curious, ask more questions even if it might make stir things up!

Member Monday

Member Monday: Clare Hirn

How did you first get involved with LVA?

In third grade I was invited to take free after school art classes from LVA.  I still remember one of the paintings I did of my family packing up the back of the station wagon for a trip.  Sorry to say I don’t know what happened to the piece but it may be best as my memory has preserved it.

When did you first know that art was going to be a big part of your life?

In college I planned to go into medical illustration.  To be honest, it wasn’t until college I realized art making could be a full-time gig.   I took time before grad school to work at a frame shop and paint, and there was no looking back. I went on to receive a graduate degree from the New York Academy of Art, painting and drawing, versus pursuing a more practical degree of medical illustration.

What does LVA add to your life?

LVA has been a staple in that I circle back around at different times in my life to re-find the organization: from being taught art lessons as a child, to teaching children as an adult, to showing in the annual shows, to having my own children take classes, to the Open Doors programs and to Open Studio weekend.  I commend the people that have kept the art spirit of LVA alive, vibrant, connecting, and giving over many years. Thank you!

How else are you involved in the community?

I have been a local artist for over 25 years, working as an artist in the community as a muralist, as a teacher at times, and as a believer and supporter of the regional visual arts.

Describe your perfect Sunday afternoon.

Out door time in sun- working in my yard, contemplating flowers and where in the yard they would be happier. 

Who is your favorite local artist?

I need to get out to galleries and studios more because there are many great working artists in our community!  And there is no central water cooler hang out!  Looking back, I will always be grateful to Mary Louise Schrodt, who showed me how to bring those patches of yellow oil paint together into the petal of a rose. It was magic before my eyes to make form happen on canvas.

Where would you like to see Louisville 10 years from now?

I do wish the visual arts of Louisville received more community support.  I would like Louisville to join the ranks of other cities that devote a certain percentage of new building dollars to art within and around the building site. It makes total economic sense as we make our city ever more inviting.

What neighborhood do you live in? What are some of your favorite things about it?

I live in Old Louisville and wouldn’t live anywhere else in Louisville!  From the architecture to those within – all are unique, some in peculiar ways ;-) It makes for a fairly diverse community.

What three items would you bring to a desert island?

A pencil, since drawing is at the heart of art making for me, lentils, and my kitty cat Tux, who is forever entertaining and loving.

What advice would you give your past self if you could?

Doors open, even as they close.

Member Monday

Member Monday: Rudy Salgado

How did you first get involved with LVA?

After moving to Louisville with an MFA, I was looking for opportunities to teach art in town. I was impressed with the longevity of the programs the LVA offers, and like taking part in that history of giving kids experience in art, but also with other kids they wouldn’t ordinarily meet. Jackie Pallesen reached out to my wife and me about it,  and I’ve been teaching high school courses for CFAC ever since.  

When did you first know that art was going to be a big part of your life?

I spent three years at a community college before I went to college, and the last semester I took an oil painting class — my first art class ever.  I was 20 years old. Then I wasn’t sure what i wanted to do for college, so I moved to San Francisco and worked construction for a year. Then I realized I liked to work with my hands, so I wanted to go to school and study art, because it would be easy.  But instead it was much more difficult and more fun than I imagined, and it remained a challenge all the way through grad school. Then I moved to Louisville to make my own art space and teach others how to get started on this crazy roller coaster. 

What does LVA add to your life?

The thing I like most about LVA is that I get to interact with young, ambitious artists from all walks of life, and I get to see them interact with each other.  Which is mostly beautiful, except for occasional rowdy political debates, which are okay, too. 

How else are you involved in the community?

I’m really interested in Louisville’s history, so I try to go to museums and get out on the river as much as I can. I moved to Louisville to start Calliope Arts Printmaking Studio/Gallery, which provides opportunities for me to teach printmaking techniques like intaglio, relief, and monotype to local and regional artists. It’ll also bring in artwork exhibitions and visiting artists from around the country, to freshen things up a bit. 

Describe your perfect Sunday afternoon.

Exploring the city - taking a bike ride, going kayaking and fishing on the river, exploring its shores for forgotten treasures and trash. 

Who is your favorite local artist?

Joyce Ogden. I’m really attracted to the sculptural forms Joyce explores, the materials she uses, and the interactions that her pieces have with the public. 

Where would you like to see Louisville 10 years from now?

I just hope that there are more interesting gallery and art spaces that are showing less traditional work - like pop-up installations with artists from around the country, artist-curated shows, and unusual materials and processes. 

What neighborhood do you live in? What are some of your favorite things about it?

I live in Smoketown, where I also run my business, Calliope Arts. I like the diversity of the neighborhood, and like researching about the neighborhood's history. I spend a lot of time imagining what it was like 130 years ago, when my home and studio was built. 

What three items would you bring to a desert island?

I would bring a hatchet, a jar of Nutella, and my metal detector. 

What advice would you give your past self if you could?

Don’t worry so much about the academic aspects of art school - sometimes artists get too caught up in labels and definitions. Spend more time just making things. 

Member Monday

Member Monday - Collin Lloyd

How did you first get involved with LVA?

After getting my Masters degree in London I moved back to Louisville as a sort of home port. I wasn't entirely sure how long I'd stay but I knew that teaching art and keep an active hand in the arts was my ultimate goal of any city I lived in, so I immediately started sniffing around the art community trying to get re-introduced. Some friends recommended the LVA as a good friend to have in Louisville and so I've been helping out as much as I can with hanging gallery shows for CFAC, watching Public (their gallery on Main), and now I'm teaching the Senior Art Seminar course for the LVA Academy. 

When did you first know that art was going to be a big part of your life?

When I was 5 or 6 I came up to my mom and said, "I want to be an artist." Which made her laugh and smile. She told me it sounded good to her, but wanted to know why I'd decided it? I answered "I don't think I want to go to school and learn to read any more." Funny enough I really did decide to be an artist - and now, wanting to be a teacher, I'll never escape school. Also I wanted to be an astronaut, dinosaur, cook/baker, doctor, physicist, anthropologist, writer, musician, actor, director, race car driver, and directive. Point is, I never really decided to be an artist, I decided that being an artist meant I never had to choose.  

What does LVA add to your life?

LVA adds that bit of community that I really enjoy seeing interact - it's given me the opportunity to teach, to have a studio space in a massive new building, and to listen in on the gallery whispers that circulate in Louisville. I enjoy seeing them watching and learning from their community and continuously seeking new ideas to better themselves and the city's visual arts playground. 

How else are you involved in the community?

At the moment my mind is very narrowed on regenerating my work and teaching where I can. Hopefully I'll quickly start finding my footing here. I've volunteered for different organizations here in the past but the city is all new to me again. 

Describe your perfect Sunday afternoon.

Sunday is me day- although it rarely actually is. My family like to do our weekly Kashmir visit for lunch and I tend to try relax for the day. But if we're going to do my perfect Sunday, I'll have to embellish a bit. Let's say I wake up to a full English breakfast. Then I go swimming in the newly imagined creek that runs down the mountains I live under. My dog is there and he enjoys the swim with me without scratching me or barking madly at his reflection. Then I think I'll go rock climbing, nothing too difficult, just a good wall to play on. Then...Kashmir, yeah, still going to eat there for sure. Then I might build something, like a raft to float down the creek on. I'd play guitar for what I believed was ten minutes but what my wife would assure me was actually two hours. Then I might nap outside- it's about 67 out. Lastly I think I would have a gigantic Sunday roast and walk the canal in London - I can teleport I suppose. Then my wife and I would watch our favorite show and go to bed knowing that we could do it all again tomorrow. That sounds about right. 

Who is your favorite local artist?

This question is cruel, but I'll narrow it to one. Sara Pitt. She's been a close friend and peer for a long time now and I've watched her work swell and change into the complex beautiful nonsense that it is today. When I say nonsense I don't mean that in the drab confusing way, I mean that she's playing with absurdity with such ease and grace that it makes me jealous- which is by far the most important emotion to make your art friends feel when they see your work. You know you are looking at an amazing piece when your first thought is a curse and a slight tenge of craftsman's envy.   

 Where would you like to see Louisville 10 years from now?

More! I want more! The galleries and museums are here... now keep going. Every part of the city should have art helping, building, and bettering. And let me be very clear— not taking, but bettering. Art spaces should be for everyone, not the same group of elite and Louisville obsessed artists. Also I'm not calling out anyone, I'm just stating a fact that every city comes to a precipice where art can be a formalist obsessed nightmare of aristocracy or an open call to the entirety of the community. Art is both a market and a community. I want Louisville to feed both.

What neighborhood do you live in? What are some of your favorite things about it?

I live in Schnitzelburg, which has one of the best names out of any neighborhood. It's obviously near German town if you don't know. I love the people, a wide range of characters and nosey elderly people watching you from their porch but smiling big when you smile at them. Dairy Kastle is a huge bonus, plus all the 'junk' shops and garden centers covered in plants. It's a plant lovers haven.

What three items would you bring to a desert island?

Two solar panels and One yacht. 

What advice would you give your past self if you could?

Apply for every scholarship ever, all of them. Also have fun, be crazy, never stick to a single medium, and make as much work as you can imagine. Do the things you mean to do when you need to do them, stop procrastinating. Also— go to London. 

Interested in becoming a member of LVA?

Member Monday

Member Monday - Wilma Bethel

How did you first get involved with LVA? 

My second year of teaching, in the Jefferson county school system, the Art supervisor, Norma Brown asked me if I wanted to teach talented and gifted students after school I said yes and the rest is history.

When did you first know that art was going to be a big part of your life?    

My first memories are of me trying to create something out of nothing.  I was four or five years old. Creating sculpture out of mud, drawing on my bed room walls, drawing in books, and boy did I get in lots of trouble.

  What does LVA add to your life?

LVA gives me a sense of accomplishment, when I help creative students develop their Artistic gifts.

 How else are you involved in the community?

I am active in my church, I am still active at my formal school, I’m in the process of creative a garden club in my neighborhood, and I volunteer at summer camps during the summer.

Describe your perfect Sunday afternoon.

My perfect Sunday afternoon would be reading a book in my beautiful garden, (smile).

Who is your favorite local artist?

William Duffy

Where would you like to see Louisville 10 years from now?

I would like to see more Art Galleries, more local students involved in the creative process, I would like to see peace and harmony among all people (I think I’m still living in the 60’s).  All of that would be great, but I would settle for a progressive city in all respects.

What neighborhood do you live in? What are some of your favorite things about it?

I live in the Shawnee Neighborhood.  I love living next to Shawnee Park— I'm only about 200 feet away.  I love walking on the river walk in the early morning seeing the ground fog in the distance. I love the sounds of nature that come with living so near a park, and I love seeing all the animals that no one knows they exist in Shawnee Park: Deer, Fox, Hawks ... I love all those things about my neighborhood.

 What three items would you bring to a desert island?

Art supplies, Books, Music

What advice would you give your past self if you could?

I analyzed everything all the time, over and over and over again.  Self, that was a waist of time.

Member Monday

Member Monday - Mo McKnight Howe

 How did you first get involved with LVA?

Marcia Boone asked me to be involved in re-working DinnerWorks when we were painting together one day. After that I did Orange Night of Art, Art Auction, helped start Art Squared and Open Studio Weekend… the rest is history!

 When did you first know that art was going to be a big part of your life?

I got into trouble in the First Grade for drawing all over my homework assignments, tests, any paper I had really. It became such a problem my parents had to meet with my teacher and they all agreed I needed to pursue art.

 What does LVA add to your life?

It’s my way of giving back to the visual art community in Louisville without making a profit. I sell local art daily at my business, but it means more to me than a paycheck. LVA is my way of walking the walk, and I enjoy every step.

 How else are you involved in the community?

I am on two other Board of Directors; Louisville Independent Business Alliance (LIBA) and Kentucky Natural Lands Trust (KNLT). These three non-profits are the three things I am most passionate about –Local Art, Land Preservation, and keeping Louisville weird with locally owned small businesses. I am also very involved with the Forecastle Foundation who helps fund projects for KNLT, primarily in the Pine Mountain corridor. It is the most bio-diverse part of our state and the it is absolutely incredible. If you haven’t been, you must go!

 Describe your perfect Sunday afternoon.

A picnic with my husband and my dog at Cherokee park.

 Who is your favorite local artist?

Ahhh! You know I can’t play favorites!! I am showing over 110 local artists at Revelry right now, and I love every one of them. I’ll say Julius Friedman, as he inspired me from a very young age to pursue a career in photography.

 Where would you like to see Louisville 10 years from now?

I would like to see it like it is now, with a few minor changes. A better public transportation system and more of a focus on the environment and air quality would be a nice. Oh and I would love to see the Botanical Gardens come to fruition! A general move towards the city is happening right now, which I love. Now the city needs to be able to accommodate the move with grocery stores, more retail, and affordable housing.

 What neighborhood do you live in? What are some of your favorite things about it?

My husband and I just moved to Butchertown from the Highlands. We wanted to live where we worked both for the environment and the economy. I am enjoying watching this neighborhood (Nulu/Butchertown) become a walking neighborhood like the Highlands and Crescent Hill. Being able to walk to work, to get coffee, to dinner is what I am used to and it makes it all the better that I have green space like the Big Four Bridge in my backyard.

 What advice would you give your past self if you could?

Trust yourself. Some of the decisions you are going to make in life are going to make you insanely scared, but know that you are doing the right thing. Hearing that from future Mo would have saved me from a quite a few anxiety attacks…