virginia

Painting

Vignette: Cheryl Buhrman


The dream of making art becomes a reality.


Painter, Cheryl Buhrman

Painter, Cheryl Buhrman

“Beauty in nature is everywhere you look!” exults Cheryl Buhrman. “That is where I get my inspiration, and through the use of color and composition on my canvas I hope to portray my connection with all living things.”

Burhman has explored a wide range of subject matter, but has recently been working on a floral series. Like so many artists who explore such imagery, she finds the power of flowers as symbols for life and reproduction, finding these inherent qualities not through overt or pretentious awareness, but through a concentration on the delicacy of the form, petals enveloping the stamen, pistil and ovary of the plant. The idea of a flower representing femininity has long since entered the realm of cliché, but there is truth in every trope, and if the balance of strength and vulnerability expressed in “Orange Delight,” “Georgia On My Mind, or ”White Rose” is any indication, Buhrman has discovered that truth for herself.

"Georgia on My Mind" by cheryl Buhrman, 18x24in, acrylic on canvas (2017), $275 |  BUY NOW

"Georgia on My Mind" by cheryl Buhrman, 18x24in, acrylic on canvas (2017), $275 | BUY NOW

“Although I taught art for several years, life got in the way and after working for 30 years in a job that wasn't my dream, my dream became a reality in retirement when I decided to start painting! I hope my paintings will fill some people with the joy that it's given me!”

Buhrman studied under Wine Kemple Harrison, Elizabeth Dawn Johnson, and Susan Tolliver, is a member of LVA, and in 2016 became a juried member of the Louisville Artisan Guild in acrylics. She just appeared at the Butchertown Art Fair in June, and will be at The Highlands Festival Sept 9, and Holiday Showcase in November 2017.

Name: Cheryl Buhrman
Hometown: Roanoke, Virginia
Education: BS, Art Education Longwood University, Farmville, Virginia.
Website: http://www.dailypaintworks.com/artists/cherylbuhrman

"Spring Garden" by Cheryl Buhrman, 24x12in, acrylic on canvas (2017), $185 |  BUY NOW

"Spring Garden" by Cheryl Buhrman, 24x12in, acrylic on canvas (2017), $185 | BUY NOW

"Blue Iris" by   Cheryl Buhrman, 12x24in, acrylic on canvas (2017), $185 |  BUY NOW

"Blue Iris" by Cheryl Buhrman, 12x24in, acrylic on canvas (2017), $185 | BUY NOW

"White Rose" by Cheryl Buhrman, 18x24in, acrylic on canvas (2017), $250 |  BUY NOW

"White Rose" by Cheryl Buhrman, 18x24in, acrylic on canvas (2017), $250 | BUY NOW

"Orange Delight" by cheryl Buhrman, 16x8in, acrylic on canvas (2016), $95 |  BUY NOW

"Orange Delight" by cheryl Buhrman, 16x8in, acrylic on canvas (2016), $95 | BUY NOW

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

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Sculpture, Painting

Feature: William M. Duffy


“You have to be dedicated, but also giving of yourself.” — William M. Duffy


"African Heads" by William Duffy, prismacolor on paper

"African Heads" by William Duffy, prismacolor on paper

Artist, William M. Duffy

Everybody calls him “Duffy”. You say that name to anyone in the visual art community over 30 and they immediately know whom you’re talking about. A Louisville native who earned his BFA in Painting from the Louisville School of Art during its fabled heyday in Anchorage back in the 1970’s, he turned to sculpture after chancing upon an automobile collision that freed some marble from a pillar. He was fascinated by the piece of stone and took to it with a hammer and screwdriver when he got home.

Needless to say, William M. Duffy obtained the proper tools, but the story illustrates the unpretentious, workaday touch that seems characteristic of this artist. He has distinguished himself as a sculptor ever since, and a new exhibit at the Kentucky Center for African American Heritage, Folks and Wee Folks: The Work of William M. Duffy, puts a long overdue spotlight on the man and his work.

Duffy was raised on Magnolia Avenue in the West End of Louisville, which, at that time, was predominantly Black, but the elementary school he attended, Virginia Ave. Elementary, was more balanced racially. “In my school, I would say it was closer to 50% White/50% Black back then,” recalls Duffy. He attended Shawnee High School, by which time he already knew he wanted to be an artist. Louisville School of Art came next, where he studied painting with Bob Barton.

"Electric Slide" by William Duffy

"Electric Slide" by William Duffy

But the most crucial influence in those early years was Gloucester Caliman “G.C.” Coxe (1907-1999). The most notable African American artist in Kentucky in that period, he was known as ‘the dean of Louisville’s African American artists.’ Duffy recalls, “He ran the Louisville Art Workshop on 35th Street back in the day, and we all called him, ‘the Master.” Duffy, along with Ed Hamilton, Sylvia Clay, Eddie Davis, and several others were a loose group around Coxe that eventually was given formal shape as “Montage.”

"I Fear None" by William Duffy, silk screen

"I Fear None" by William Duffy, silk screen

“It was difficult at that time for any of us as individuals to get a show in Louisville, so we formed Montage because we thought there would be strength in numbers. Part of it was that there was a militant, political edge in much of our work, and that seemed to make it even more difficult to be accepted by traditional galleries.” Montage exhibited as a group for several years, including at The Speed Museum, before disbanding, but this was happening at a time when several young, outspoken Black people holding a meeting could too easily arouse fear and suspicion. “Ed’s Shelby Street studio was kind of our center,” says Duffy, “and one night we emerged from a meeting there to find four police cars waiting for us with questions – ‘what kind of meeting was this?’ – that kind of thing…because the neighbors had called them; and that was in a predominantly Black neighborhood!”

The group also sought opportunities elsewhere. “G.C., Ed, and myself were in a show in Atlanta, so we drove to get to the exhibit opening, and then almost nobody came because the Falcons had a big game at the same time,” recalls Duffy, laughing at the memory. They returned to Louisville the same night driving for 8 straight hours in hammering, blinding rain.

"A Little Bird Told Me" by William Duffy, 7.75x5x7in, alabaster sculpture (2011)

"A Little Bird Told Me" by William Duffy, 7.75x5x7in, alabaster sculpture (2011)

But Louisville remained home for all three men, a commitment to the community that Duffy worries is not carrying through with younger generations of African American artists. Having taught youth art classes for over 30 years now (including with LVA), Duffy has seen a lot of talent come up through the education system only to move on to other cities that afford more opportunity. “G.C. stayed here, Ed stayed here…we came together in support of each other, and I’m not certain that is happening enough with young Black artists in Louisville right now.”

“You have to be dedicated, but also giving of yourself. I still hear young people who have the attitude, ‘This is what we need – this is how you can help us… almost never what do you need – how can we help you?” It is a different ethos from Duffy’s halcyon days with Montage. “We were always encouraging each other, always working to help each other out. I built the turntable in Ed Hamilton’s studio that he still uses today. We always did for each other.”

Duffy speaks about his life with self-effacing ease, yet not without a sure sense of his place in the history of African American artists in Louisville. While arguably not as celebrated as some of his contemporaries, his legacy of teaching ensures a lasting influence on the past, present, and future of the Louisville arts community.

Duffy’s work can be found in numerous private, corporate, and public collections, including Phillip Morris USA, Brown-Forman Corporation, Kentucky Fried Chicken (now YUM! Brands, Inc.), Humana Inc., The Louisville Orchestra, and The Speed Art Museum.

"At Rest" by William Duffy, 6.5x11.6.5in, bronze sculpture (2011)

"At Rest" by William Duffy, 6.5x11.6.5in, bronze sculpture (2011)

Folks and Wee Folks

April 3- May 25, 2017

Monday – Friday, 10:00am-4:00pm

Kentucky Center for African American Heritage
1701 West Muhammad Ali Boulevard
Louisville, KY 40203
502-583-4100
kcaah.org

Hometown: Louisville, KY
Age: 63
Education: BFA in Painting, Louisville School of Art
Gallery Representative: E&S Gallery (Louisville, KY)
Website: http://www.wmduffy.com/

"On My Block" by William Duffy

"On My Block" by William Duffy

"Queen for a Day" by William Duffy, alabaster sculpture on wood block

"Queen for a Day" by William Duffy, alabaster sculpture on wood block

Artist, Duffy with his wife Sherrolyn. Photo by Jason Harris.

Artist, Duffy with his wife Sherrolyn. Photo by Jason Harris.

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

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Illustration, Drawing

Vignette: Darrenn Canton

"Guardian of the Ramparts" by Darrenn Canton, 14x24in, watercolor, colored pencil, gouache (2016)

"Guardian of the Ramparts" by Darrenn Canton, 14x24in, watercolor, colored pencil, gouache (2016)

Fantasy art is often viewed pejoratively by the ‘fine art’ world, yet it is often highly inspirational to young, aspiring artists. Darrenn Canton was such a young artist, and his ambition drew him towards the worlds of commercial illustration and a desire to illustrate children’s books.

"Krampusnacht" by Darrenn Canton, 9x12in, watercolor & colored pencil (2016)

"Krampusnacht" by Darrenn Canton, 9x12in, watercolor & colored pencil (2016)

“I'm a weirdo who likes to draw and paint monsters. I specialize in cartooning, children’s book art, and fantasy illustration. My work emphasizes character and wit, and tries not to take itself too seriously.”

There is a long tradition of escapism and the fantastic throughout art history. Religious imagery embraces the sacred and profane, and Canton’s gargoyle, perched upon a battlement, recalls such classical antecedents as much as comic culture, as does his depiction of a voracious-yet-still-jolly Krampus; a resurgent holiday figure drawn from the same European traditions that gave us Saint Nicholas. The light tone that Canton brings to bear does not obscure that connection.

Canton is still relatively new to Louisville, though he has fallen in love with the city's art scene and hopes to be more active in the future, while he continues to move forward in his goals of, “…writing stories and telling tales to stoke the fires of the imagination.” Canton is a frequent visitor to comic conventions around the Ohio Valley region, including Derby City Comic Con in June, and his work will be on display at the Fantasy and Science Fiction convention ConGlomeration April 7-9 at the Ramada Plaza Hotel in Louisville.

Hometown: Washington, DC
Age: 30
Education: Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA; Illustration Academy, Richmond, VA
Website: http://www.dcantonart.com

"Gone Fishin'" by Darrenn Canton, 10x14in, ink, watercolor & gouache (2013), $200 |  BUY NOW

"Gone Fishin'" by Darrenn Canton, 10x14in, ink, watercolor & gouache (2013), $200 | BUY NOW

"Breakfast'" by Darrenn Canton, 9x12in, ink, watercolor & gouache (2013), $150 |  BUY NOW

"Breakfast'" by Darrenn Canton, 9x12in, ink, watercolor & gouache (2013), $150 | BUY NOW

"Blue-Haired Meanie'" by Darrenn Canton, 9x12in, ink, watercolor & colored pencil (2017)

"Blue-Haired Meanie'" by Darrenn Canton, 9x12in, ink, watercolor & colored pencil (2017)

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2016 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

Are you interested in being on Artebella?    Click here    to learn more.

Are you interested in being on Artebella? Click here to learn more.