relationship

Painting

Vignette: Tom Cannady

"Scooch Over, Hon" by Tom Cannady, 48x60in, acrylic on canvas (2016), $3600  |  BUY NOW

"Scooch Over, Hon" by Tom Cannady, 48x60in, acrylic on canvas (2016), $3600  | BUY NOW

Tom Cannady describes his paintings as, “nostalgic representations of Americana,” and he has expressed that notion primarily through the use of mid-20th century automobiles, vacation images, and signs. Iconic images filled with the sunlight and faux innocence of Frankie Avalon and Annette Funicello.

There were often people before, but they were typical – middle class Americans living the dream on a hard-earned vacation, but in newer work, Cannady introduces some of the same over-exaggerated quality that we find in the 1950’s cars: sleek, fins and detailing that call attention to themselves and remind us of a time when how a car looked mattered more than fuel efficiency, into human female figures. “They Went That Away” highlights the kind of emphatic sex symbol of the period, while “Scooch Over” completes the relationship between objectification of women and automobiles that has never left us, but which was in much greater bloom at this seminal moment.  

"OneTwoThree" by Tom Cannady, 24x36in, acrylic on canvas (2016), $1800  |  BUY NOW

"OneTwoThree" by Tom Cannady, 24x36in, acrylic on canvas (2016), $1800  | BUY NOW

Cannady creates paintings in what he describes as, “a pop impressionist style creating new perspectives or recreating unique moods from another time. I use vintage photographs acquired from multiple sources as reference points and inspiration. Many were originally printed in black & white, which gives me complete freedom to choose the pallet best suited to the composition. I lean to warm, bright hues with strong contrast.”

Cannady is currently showing works at Makers Crucible Showroom and Craft(s) Gallery & Mercantile in Louisville, Kentucky. In November 2016 he was selected as one of twenty artists representing the sixty participants in the LVA Open Studio Weekend in a group show of work at the University of Louisville, Hite Gallery.

Hometown: Louisville, Kentucky
Age: 59
Education: BS in Marketing and a minor in Art, Murray State University
Website: http://www.tjcannady.com

"They Went That Away" by Tom Cannady, 36x48in, acrylic on canvas (2016), $2400 |  BUY NOW

"They Went That Away" by Tom Cannady, 36x48in, acrylic on canvas (2016), $2400 | BUY NOW

"Launch Party" by Tom Cannady, 48x24in, acrylic on canvas (2016), $2400 |  BUY NOW

"Launch Party" by Tom Cannady, 48x24in, acrylic on canvas (2016), $2400 | BUY NOW

"Hurry Up, Fred!" by Tom Cannady, 48x36in, acrylic on canvas (2015) $2800 |  BUY NOW

"Hurry Up, Fred!" by Tom Cannady, 48x36in, acrylic on canvas (2015) $2800 | BUY NOW

Cannady's studio

Cannady's studio

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

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Drawing, Painting

Vignette: Britany Baker

"Reflection" by Britany Baker, 108x25in, charcoal on paper (2016)

"Reflection" by Britany Baker, 108x25in, charcoal on paper (2016)

For the second year, Louisville Visual Art has selected a local artist to be the Featured Artist for the annual art[squared] Anonymous 8" x 8" Art Sale: Britany Baker.

"Above the Fray" by Britany Baker, 36x36in, oil on canvas (2017), $1800

"Above the Fray" by Britany Baker, 36x36in, oil on canvas (2017), $1800

While the sale will consist of 200 original 8” x 8” pieces by artists from around the region, it will also include this new, larger painting, “Above the Fray”, created by Baker just for this event. For anyone who has seen recent work by the artist, the depiction of a bird will come as no surprise. Baker’s paintings are much sought after by collectors, and the birds are especially popular. It is not difficult to see why.

Baker is known for abstract imagery based on natural forms, as described by Curator Jessica Bennett Kincaid: “…Baker’s fluid imagery saturates the viewer with a heightened connection to their environmental surroundings. Subtly creating an emotive relationship to singular aspects of the places we inhabit, these flowing abstractions allude to the collision of the natural world and human influence.“

Yet the aviary “characters” (they are not real birds) are a highly representational contrast to such work; an exquisite study of nature nestled in feathers that seem at once realistic and a ruse. Because of its position, the creature has the feeling of being in flight, yet the forms surrounding the head also give the appearance of being grounded. Baker creates a compelling tension between the intimacy of the detailed observation of the bird and the epic visual quality of the composition, playing with the viewer’s comprehension in a way that is irresistible.

Artist, Britany Baker

Artist, Britany Baker

Since December, Baker has worked full time as the Art Director for Red Pin Media, and is Vice-President at Art Sanctuary, a non-profit community-oriented arts collective supporting local visual, literary, and performing arts through events, promotion, and education.

art[squared]

All works donated to art[squared] will be exhibited anonymously and sold on a first-come, first-served basis at LVA's new location at 1538 Lytle Street on Friday, April 7th at 7 PM. The beauty of anonymous exhibition is viewers will be able to respond to the artwork on its merits alone, without prejudice or preference. Each 8” x 8” piece will be priced at $100. The work will also be on public display for one week leading up to the sale, and any unsold work for an additional week following the sale.

“Above the Fray”, by Britany Baker, will be sold through Silent Auction that will close out at 8:30pm on April 7, 2017. Opening Bid is $1000 and bids will be accepted in increments of $50. If you wish to make a bid before the event, email keith@louisvillevisualart.org with your name, mailing address, email, phone, and bid.

"Above the Fray (detail)" by Britany Baker, 36x36in, oil on canvas (2017)

"Above the Fray (detail)" by Britany Baker, 36x36in, oil on canvas (2017)

All proceeds benefit CFAC, which educates over 1,000 artistically talented and visually driven children annually in the Greater Louisville area. Last year, we were able to raise over $24,000 during art[squared]! This provided students with scholarships and helped offset instructor and supply costs in all 11 participating Kentuckiana counties!

“Little Bird” by Britany Baker, 8x8in, oil on canvas (2016) NFS - Sold at last years  art[squared]  event.

“Little Bird” by Britany Baker, 8x8in, oil on canvas (2016) NFS - Sold at last years art[squared] event.

We cordially invite you to the art[squared] Artists Reception & Preview Party on Friday, April 7th at 7 PM at LVA (1538 Lytle Street). A great opportunity to snag your favorite 8" x 8" before it's gone the next morning!

Hundreds of art works - the largest number of talented local artists to be found in one location – and each piece is ONLY $100.

For tickets and more details about the event visit:
http://www.louisvillevisualart.org/artsquared2017/

Hometown: Louisville, KY
Age: 46
Education: BFA with concentration in drawing and painting, Xavier University (Cincinnati, Ohio)
Website: http://www.britanybaker.com/

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

"Aging" by Britany Baker, 24x36in, oil on canvas (2017), $485 |  BUY NOW

"Aging" by Britany Baker, 24x36in, oil on canvas (2017), $485 | BUY NOW

“Gentler” by Britany Baker, 26x26in, oil on canvas (2014), $450 |  BUY NOW

“Gentler” by Britany Baker, 26x26in, oil on canvas (2014), $450 | BUY NOW

“Amaryllis” by Britany Baker, 37x49in, oil on canvas (2015), NFS

“Amaryllis” by Britany Baker, 37x49in, oil on canvas (2015), NFS

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Painting

Vignette: Barry Burcaw

Burcaw standing next to one of his sold paintings.

Burcaw standing next to one of his sold paintings.

Geometry is the mathematical method of understanding specific spatial relationships and forms through numbers. Humankind requires it to build the society they occupy, but is also can be applied to less concrete forms, such as the construction of music. In the paintings of Barry Burcaw, architectural vistas are rendering in abstract terms that are schematically precise, but the structures don’t seem bound to bedrock.

The connecting forms could be the levels of skyscrapers stretching out to the far horizon while simultaneously obscuring that line, but Burcaw cites music as an influence as well, so that one is forced to ponder the shapes and forms as elements within a symphony; layers of notes and phrases meticulously constructed on the page in an academic method. Yet, when played, the score lifts away from the cold, analysis of the blueprint to become something that feels organic and heightened. Musical and visual harmony become metaphorical companions as Burcaw’s strategy with color and composition do the same for the viewer.

"Blue Plateaus" by Barry Burcaw, 50 x 50in, oil on canvas (2016)

"Blue Plateaus" by Barry Burcaw, 50 x 50in, oil on canvas (2016)

Burcaw recently exhibited work at Jenkins Eliason Interiors.  He is now preparing to offer a selection of his paintings as giclee reproductions. Burcaw paints on a large scale, and he hopes making them available on a different scale will be a smart marketing choice. “I have realized that if the price of an original isn't a problem the size often is and vice versa.”

Hometown: Palisades, New York
Age: 73
Education: BS in Graphic Design, University of Bridgeport, CT

"Vanishing Point" by Barry Burcaw, 50 x 50in, oil on canvas (2016), $3200 |  BUY NOW

"Vanishing Point" by Barry Burcaw, 50 x 50in, oil on canvas (2016), $3200 | BUY NOW

"Global Warming" by Barry Burcaw, 50 x 50in, oil on canvas (2016), $2800 |  BUY NOW

"Global Warming" by Barry Burcaw, 50 x 50in, oil on canvas (2016), $2800 | BUY NOW

"Parthenon" by Barry Burcaw, 50 x 50in, oil on canvas (2016), $4500 |  BUY NOW

"Parthenon" by Barry Burcaw, 50 x 50in, oil on canvas (2016), $4500 | BUY NOW

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

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Installation, Mixed Media, Painting

Vignette: Lennon Michalski

"Ghost Bike" Installation by Lennon Michalski (2016)

"Ghost Bike" Installation by Lennon Michalski (2016)

In a body of work entitled Ghost Bike, Lennon Michalski explores the relationship between man and machine, expressing a complex array of themes, most importantly, the tyranny of technology and the fragility of the human form.

“Ghost Bike takes a specific look at Motorcycles, considering the uniqueness that describes the machine, the man that chooses to indulge in that machine, and the nature of their relationship,” says Michalski. “The imagery in the series considers motorcycle accidents to represent their dangerous cultural association. I specifically chose the motorcycle, the imagery, and popular icons to reflect my personal engagement with this idea. My grandfather was killed on a motorcycle, and this has largely inspired these pieces in the hopes of bringing attention to the motorcycle to provide an understanding of their own distinctive culture.”

"Wrecked Bike"   by Lennon Michalski, 36 x 48 x 84 in, Honda Motorcycle and paint (2016) |  Photograph by Brian Campbell

"Wrecked Bike" by Lennon Michalski, 36 x 48 x 84 in, Honda Motorcycle and paint (2016) | Photograph by Brian Campbell

Michalski in his studio | Photograph by Adam Brester

Michalski in his studio | Photograph by Adam Brester

“Even when these tragedies strike, society often places blame on the cyclist, for they, have willingly put them selves in harm’s way. Motorcycles are largely considered unsafe and rebellious in the eyes of the public because of the sense of vulnerability and danger associated with motorcycles. In an effort to define the broad spectrum of this machine’s interaction with the human condition, I sought to understand why so many individuals crave to connect with it. I realized that engagement with motorcycles cultivated an undeniable sense of community. Motorcyclists feel passionately about their investment in this machine, creating a strong bond between, not only the machine and its owner, but also everyone who rides. In order to incorporate this idea of community, I created works that also represent this aspect of motorcycle culture. I examine the documentation of a group of cyclists traveling cross-country to pay tribute to the fallen. Rather than viewing the death of the biker as a careless rebel, he is considered a fallen hero, who deserves the greatest of respect. Within the motorcycle community there is boundless devotion, which allows for the machine to act as a tool in eliciting genuine human interaction.”

"Wreck" by Lennon Michalski, 72 x 108 in, water based pigment and mixed medium on canvas (2016)

"Wreck" by Lennon Michalski, 72 x 108 in, water based pigment and mixed medium on canvas (2016)

In his paintings, Michalski often uses his hands directly in applying the medium, building transparent layers that evoke a passage of time. “My paintings are not objects assembled by machines or other individuals; I develop a bond and communicate through the development of each work. This technique is based on a physical language; by pushing the paint with my hands, I am infusing my energy into the gestures. I learn something new from each piece allowing my process to open doors I would have never thought to walk through. Through the creation of digital work, paintings, and sculpture, I hope to bring attention to the motorcyclist so that the sense of community motorcycle culture creates can continue to thrive. The motorcycle acts as a metaphor to represent the motorcyclist himself, with the engine acting as the heart of the individual, and the community. While many have fallen victim to the unpredictability of this machine, it uniquely acts as a tool to cultivate relationships, activate commitment, and instill a sense of community.”

Michalski also just self published a children's book called "How Penguins Save Television," a story that explores what it means for society as it attempts to evolve with the aid of science and innovation. The book engages children with the natural world around them through technological modifications, such as the jetpack.

Since 2008 Michalski has been an Instructor of Digital Media, Drawing, and 2D Design at the University of Kentucky.

Hometown: Lexington, Kentucky
Age: 36
Education: BFA in Painting, Eastern Kentucky University 2004; MFA in Painting and Digital Media, University of Colorado at Boulder, 2006
Website: http://www.lennonmichalski.com

"Stoplights" by Lennon Michalski, 72 x 108 in, water based pigment and mix medium on canvas (2016)

"Stoplights" by Lennon Michalski, 72 x 108 in, water based pigment and mix medium on canvas (2016)

"Heart" by Lennon Michalski, 72 x 108 in, water based pigment and mixed medium on canvas (2016)

"Heart" by Lennon Michalski, 72 x 108 in, water based pigment and mixed medium on canvas (2016)

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2016 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

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Photography

Vignette: Violet Herrmann

"Faces" (set of 2) by Violet Herrmann, 10x16in, photograph (2014)

"Faces" (set of 2) by Violet Herrmann, 10x16in, photograph (2014)

As a photographer and a designer, Violet Herrmann states she is, “…a firm believer in simplicity with a bold hint.” In “Mellwood,” her photograph reads at first glance as a captured ‘snapshot’ – a random glimpse of a passing moment, yet the cool, evening shades of blue are seductive, and there is tantalizing mystery in the dramatic depth found in the contrasting channels of space. It would all be a solid, albeit academic composition except for the hesitant figure on the right, leading us further into the scene but arresting that momentum by turning on their heel. It is the key to lifting the image beyond the ordinary.

All of which reflects the idea that good composition and design is a series of relationships, most of which might never register fully with the viewer, but will have undeniable impact on how a piece is read. Herrmann explains, “I believe that the best designs appear to have their components distributed randomly throughout the page; but one finds that every element is aligned to another found in the piece.”

"Mellwood" by Violet Herrmann, 17x11in, photograph (2016)

"Mellwood" by Violet Herrmann, 17x11in, photograph (2016)

“My work describes me as an artist as well as a person. As a stubborn perfectionist, my designs reflect my personality by carefully placing components in relation to one another while maintaining an edginess that makes them unique. I believe that a design must ultimately speak for itself to be considered truly successful. If I have done a good job on my work, my personality should be able to shine through and reflect me as a designer.”

Herrmann has worked as a Graphic Design Intern for Simon Signs in Louisville Kentucky and her work has been displayed in the Kentucky College of Art and Design (KyCAD) Gala in the 849 Gallery, Louisville Kentucky. While at KyCAD she was awarded the Presidential Scholarship.

Hometown: Charlestown, Indiana
Age: 21
Education: BFA candidate, General Fine Arts, Kentucky College of Art + Design at Spalding University, Louisville Kentucky

"Louisville Door Series" (1 of 12) by Violet Herrmann, 10x10in, photograph (2014)

"Louisville Door Series" (1 of 12) by Violet Herrmann, 10x10in, photograph (2014)

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2016 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

Are you interested in being on Artebella?    Click here    to learn more.

Are you interested in being on Artebella? Click here to learn more.