quilt

Painting

Vignette: Barbara Tyson Mosley

"Awakening - Rise and Embrace the Morning" by Barbara Tyson Mosley, 24x48in, acrylic on canvas (2017), $1500 |  BUY NOW

"Awakening - Rise and Embrace the Morning" by Barbara Tyson Mosley, 24x48in, acrylic on canvas (2017), $1500 | BUY NOW

Barbara Tyson Mosley in her studio.

Barbara Tyson Mosley in her studio.

We have observed that quite often fiber artists work like painters, but Barbara Tyler Mosley is a painter whose work might put you in mind of some fiber artists. Of course, the comparison assumes the intuitive manipulation of plastic medium is, while not unique to the act of painting, at least a defining characteristic. Mosley’s mark-making application is both organic and highly structured.

Her abstract landscapes are vibrant with color. “These works harmoniously emphasize the relationship between earth, sea, and sky,” it states in Mosley’s Artist’s Statement. “As she quickly works on canvas manipulating the paint to reflect light and color changes, the viewer’s eye sees a playground of color and movement as she expands the scale of color and line.”

 In the tightly constructed layers of that color and line we can see the echo of the hand stitching of a textile artist, allowing repetition of the mark to create visual texture in the manner of thread stitched through fabric. This repetition carries through the strict, 12” x 12” dimensions of the individual paintings in the series, so that a perspective from a distance puts us in mind of quilt construction.

"Moonlight is Yellow" by Barbara Tyson Mosley, 12x12in, acrylic on canvas (2016), $500 |  BUY NOW

"Moonlight is Yellow" by Barbara Tyson Mosley, 12x12in, acrylic on canvas (2016), $500 | BUY NOW

But Mosley is still, determinedly, a painter, boasting a highly developed point-of-view on the integration of representational and abstract.

Mosley’s current exhibit, "12 x 12 Plus" will be at KORE Gallery at the Mellwood Art Center in Louisville through February 28, 2017. She will then be showing more of the 12 x 12 paintings at the New Edition Gallery in Lexington, KY through the month of March. This fall, she will be exhibiting with Tomisha Allen in September and October of 2017 at the Wayside Expressions Gallery, Louisville, KY.

"Evening Calm" by Barbara Tyson Mosley, 12x12in, acrylic on canvas (2016), $500 |  BUY NOW

"Evening Calm" by Barbara Tyson Mosley, 12x12in, acrylic on canvas (2016), $500 | BUY NOW

Permanent Collections:
PNC Bank Tower, Contemporary Ethnic Dolls, Pittsburgh, PA
Heritage Art Center Gallery, Lexington, KY
The University of Virginia Medical Center, Charlottesville, VA
The Corcoran Gallery of Art (Evans-Tibbs Collection), Washington, DC
The Fine Arts Institute, San Bernardino Museum of Art, Redlands, CA
The International Multicultural Fine Arts Exchange Foundation, Washington, DC

Hometown: Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
Education: BA, Studio Art, Painting, University of the District of Columbia, Washington, DC, 1985; MA in Liberal Studies Degree (Humanities; 20th Century Art History) Georgetown University, Washington, DC, 1990; MFA Candidate, Design George Washington University, Washington, DC, 2002-2004

"In the Night" by Barbara Tyson Mosley, 12x12in, acrylic on canvas (2016), $500 |  BUY NOW

"In the Night" by Barbara Tyson Mosley, 12x12in, acrylic on canvas (2016), $500 | BUY NOW

"Morning Coffee and Caramel Tea" by Barbara Tyson Mosley, 24x36in, acrylic on canvas (2014), $650 |  BUY NOW

"Morning Coffee and Caramel Tea" by Barbara Tyson Mosley, 24x36in, acrylic on canvas (2014), $650 | BUY NOW

"The 13th of Friday" by Barbara Tyson Mosley, 36x48in, acrylic on canvas (2013), $2500 |  BUY NOW

"The 13th of Friday" by Barbara Tyson Mosley, 36x48in, acrylic on canvas (2013), $2500 | BUY NOW

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2016 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

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Fiber, Painting, Mixed Media

Vignette: Denise Furnish

"Gain/Loss (detail)" by Denise Furnish, 31x31in, yoyo quilt patch, archival ink on cotton, acrylic, $900 |  BUY NOW

"Gain/Loss (detail)" by Denise Furnish, 31x31in, yoyo quilt patch, archival ink on cotton, acrylic, $900 | BUY NOW


“I was asked, ‘What is a quilt?’ It is a question that, at first, seems obvious, but the answer goes much deeper than a hand-made bedcovering. The process of defining a quilt is the essence of my art. The quilt is a sign of women’s work. The making of a quilt implies a chain of signification through conception, use, deterioration, and, in my case, transformation.” — from Denise Furnish’s Artist Statement


"  Gold Star" by Denise Furnish,   77.5x76in, discarded lone star quilt, acrylic, $3200 |  BUY NOW

"Gold Star" by Denise Furnish, 77.5x76in, discarded lone star quilt, acrylic, $3200 | BUY NOW

In the history of Modern Art, or the still-being-written chronicle of Contemporary Art, the quilt can still seem like an outlier, despite several generations of fiber artists using it as the foundation of their work. Yet the very associations that might lie at the heart of perceived limitations – namely its functional role as comforting family heirloom, are also the source of the quilt’s unique power in communicating themes and ideas. Denise Furnish exploits these attributes but also subverts them by using discarded quilts as a vehicle for painting.

"Bed" by  Robert Rauschenberg  75.25x31.5x8in, oil and pencil on pillow, quilt, and sheet on wood supports (1955) © 2017 Robert Rauschenberg Foundation

"Bed" by Robert Rauschenberg 75.25x31.5x8in, oil and pencil on pillow, quilt, and sheet on wood supports (1955) © 2017 Robert Rauschenberg Foundation

“The quilt as a sign for bed interests me, yet I nearly always remove quilts from the bed and put them on the wall. For his collage, “Bed”, Robert Rauschenberg took a quilt from a bed and destroyed it to make art in 1955. The difference is that I am interested in taking already damaged quilts and transforming them into art. I later realized that seeing that work in the Museum of Modern Art in 1968 has influenced me.”

The inherent qualities of each quilt are crucial in the conceptual nature of Furnish’s approach, informing her thoughts and application of medium, but there is also a sense of rejuvenation emanating from the transformation of a tattered, worse-for-wear object becoming a wholly new creative action.  

“My work developed as a chain of signification beginning with the recognition of quilt as a sign of pre-feminist ‘women’s work.’ This work was created and executed with attention to design and purpose. It was used, washed, worn. Often, it was separated from its maker. It was found by me and painted–a sign not only of transformation, but also of post-feminist women’s achievement.”

Denise Furnish’s work is currently featured in the Louisville Visual Art exhibit, Tessile Ora, on display at Louisville’s Metro Hall through May 26, 2017.

Hometown: Louisville, Kentucky
Education: BA, University of Kentucky, 1972; Attended Louisville School of Art 1980-1981; BFA University of Louisville, 2008; MA University of Louisville, 2009
Website: http://www.denisefurnish.com

"Red Basketweave" by Denise Furnish, 56x37in, worn and discarded flower basket crib quilt, acrylic, $1200 |  BUY NOW

"Red Basketweave" by Denise Furnish, 56x37in, worn and discarded flower basket crib quilt, acrylic, $1200 | BUY NOW

"  Flower Garden Boogie Woogie" by Denise Furnish, 48x53in, worn and discarded flower basket crib quilt, acrylic,telephone wire, tablecloth, $1200 |  BUY NOW

"Flower Garden Boogie Woogie" by Denise Furnish, 48x53in, worn and discarded flower basket crib quilt, acrylic,telephone wire, tablecloth, $1200 | BUY NOW

"Lavender Log Cabin" by Denise Furnish, 40x28in, discarded log cabin crib quilt top, acrylic, $900|  BUY

"Lavender Log Cabin" by Denise Furnish, 40x28in, discarded log cabin crib quilt top, acrylic, $900| BUY

"FIreball" by Denise Furnish, 43x29in, discarded fireball crib quilt, acrylic, $1200|  BUY NOW

"FIreball" by Denise Furnish, 43x29in, discarded fireball crib quilt, acrylic, $1200| BUY NOW

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2016 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserve d.

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Fiber

Vignette: Kathleen Loomis


“My flags are somewhat the worse for wear.” Kathleen Loomis


"Fading" by Kathleen Loomis, 59x99in, fiber (2016) $8000 |  BUY NOW

"Fading" by Kathleen Loomis, 59x99in, fiber (2016) $8000 | BUY NOW

Political art can be a misnomer; on some level all of art is, by its very existence, ‘political’, and more overt statements are often best realized in simple terms. In her most recent work, Kathleen Loomis has been working with the American flag, appropriate both in that she is a fiber artist, and that there is arguably no symbol that carries more emotional and thematic weight than the Red, White, and Blue.

"Flagging" by Kathleen Loomis, 98x54in, fiber (2016) $7000  |  BUY NOW  

"Flagging" by Kathleen Loomis, 98x54in, fiber (2016) $7000  | BUY NOW 

“The flag is a stand-in for our country, so flags in distress convey feelings about the state of our democracy. Even beyond the disturbing recent elections, it seems that so many things in government and our legal system are going downhill. Maybe our nation and its democratic ideals aren’t as crisp and bright as they used to be; as a nation we are getting weary and have lost our mojo, so my flags are somewhat the worse for wear.”

Loomis’ statement may reveal a particular position, and the images are equally straightforward, yet they do not limit themselves by pointing to cause or solution. There are protocols for flying the flag that reinforce that it is also a vital tool for communication – flown upside down it is a symbol of distress to approaching forces, so co-opting it as a motif in visual art feels natural. “Kentucky Graveyard” and “Postage 3 Memorial Day” powerfully comment on the cost of freedom by echoing the flag-draped caskets of deceased military returning from foreign wars, while “More Equal Than Others” speaks to the inequity that has always been a struggle in American society. Loomis may have current events on her mind, but these themes are forever with us.

You can keep up with Loomis through a lively and informative blog on her website. Loomis joined Pyro Gallery in 2016, and is currently a part of the New Year, New Pyro Artists exhibit that runs through February 18, and will be participating in an Artist’s Gallery Talk there on Saturday, January 14, at 12:30pm.

"Fading" (detail)

"Fading" (detail)

Recent Exhibitions:
·      Indianapolis Museum of Art, Indianapolis, IN, Dialogues, 2016
·      Dairy Barn, Athens, OH, and on tour throughout the US, Quilt National ’15, ’11, ’09, and ’03 (Quilts Japan Prize, 2009)
·      Jasper Arts Center, Jasper, IN, Annual Juried Art Exhibits, 2001, 2004, 2006, 2011, 2015 (award of merit), 2011, Best in Show, 2015).

Hometown: Saginaw, Michigan
Education: BA in Journalism, Syracuse University; MSJ Northwestern University
Website: http://kathleenloomis.com

"Kentucky Graveyard (Iraq)" by Kathleen Loomis, 71x60in, fiber (2006) NFS

"Kentucky Graveyard (Iraq)" by Kathleen Loomis, 71x60in, fiber (2006) NFS

"Kentucky Graveyard (Iraq)" (detail)

"Kentucky Graveyard (Iraq)" (detail)

"Postage 3: Memorial Day" by Kathleen Loomis, 86x100in, fiber (2008) NFS

"Postage 3: Memorial Day" by Kathleen Loomis, 86x100in, fiber (2008) NFS

"Postage 3: Memorial Day" (detail)

"Postage 3: Memorial Day" (detail)

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2016 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

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Mixed Media, Painting, Sculpture

Vignette: Tom Pfannerstill

"Ali Center and River West" by Tom Pfannerstill, 30x45in, acrylic on canvas (2016)

"Ali Center and River West" by Tom Pfannerstill, 30x45in, acrylic on canvas (2016)

Artists are sometimes magicians, creating illusions of space and time. Tom Pfannerstill’s “From the Street” series appear to be trash, candy boxes, fast food cups, oilcans, violently pressed flat by the heavy tread of delivery trucks. The artist finds these items in the street and alleyways, but this is not what you see on the gallery wall. Pfannerstill recreates each cast-off container as carved wood sculptures painted with acrylics.

It is a highly successful trompe l’oeil effect. The notion of picking any of these up by hand in the alley might be distasteful, but the seductive desire to touch the sculptural replication is difficult to control, even if only to verify that they are indeed not the flattened and filthy ‘real thing’. Pfannerstill applies the same approach to recreating objects from around his studio “They have been altered, bent, folded and scarred,” explains the artist, “ …in a word individualized. They touch on issues of commercialism and consumerism, but are mostly intended to be subtle reminders of the temporality of all things.”

"Spring Street Tavern" by Tom Pfannerstill, 19.25x24in, acrylic on canvas (2016)

"Spring Street Tavern" by Tom Pfannerstill, 19.25x24in, acrylic on canvas (2016)

Pfannerstill is most renowned for the painted sculptures, but actually is identified through several different styles and medium. “The work changes often, but I find myself returning again and again to several major areas of investigation; three-dimensional still life, found object works, a series of the human head (in this case, mine), quilts and quilt patterns using un-quiltlike materials, blue paintings, and of late black paintings.”

Now, inspired by flying out of NYC at night, Pfannerstill hs been immersed in a series of paintings of cities at night; darkness punctuated by points of light. The work is not like anything people are familiar from this artist, which is why he is particularly excited about them. 

Pfannerstill currently has a show in Nashville Tennessee at the Cumberland Gallery. He will also be exhibiting with Caroline Waite at Galerie Hertz in Louisville, Kentucky November 13 through December 31, 2016.

Hometown: Louisville
Age: 64
Education: BFA, Western Kentucky University, 1975; School of Hard Knocks, 1975-present
Gallery Representation: Galerie Hertz, Louisville; Cumberland Gallery, Nashville, TN; Jonathan Novak Contemporary, Los Angeles, CA; Ellis-Walker Gallery, Bowling Green, KY; Sager-Braudis Gallery, Columbia, MO
Website: http://www.tpfannerstill.com

"Brillo" by Tom Pfannerstill, acrylic and/or enamel on carved basswood (2016)

"Brillo" by Tom Pfannerstill, acrylic and/or enamel on carved basswood (2016)

"Eggo" by Tom Pfannerstill, acrylic and/or enamel on carved basswood (2016)

"Eggo" by Tom Pfannerstill, acrylic and/or enamel on carved basswood (2016)

"Ultimate Lemons" by Tom Pfannerstill, acrylic and/or enamel on carved basswood (2016)

"Ultimate Lemons" by Tom Pfannerstill, acrylic and/or enamel on carved basswood (2016)

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Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2016 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

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