landscapes

Painting

Vignette: Brian Bailey

"I want you to get lost in my work." - Brian Bailey

"Waldeck with Mustard" by Brian Bailey, Oil on found wood door, 80x28in, 2017, POR

"Waldeck with Mustard" by Brian Bailey, Oil on found wood door, 80x28in, 2017, POR

Brian Bailey combines a concentration of mark making with an authoritative development of space. For many artists, focusing on surface comes at the expense of depth in the realization of realistic space, but Bailey’s subjects are traditional. The viewer’s awareness of the rigorous application of each brush stroke is but an introduction to the image, one that draws you in to place and atmosphere through texture and composition.

Bailey describes himself as, “first and foremost a landscape painter, although it isn't unheard of for me to crank out a portrait or three. I work exclusively with oil paint. I just love the malleability of it, the fluidity. It can be reworked over and over again. In college, that's where the love affair began with this medium.”

"On the Ohio" by Brian Bailey, Oil on canvas, 18x24in, 2016, POR

"On the Ohio" by Brian Bailey, Oil on canvas, 18x24in, 2016, POR

“And with Gustav Klimt. his erotica, his portraiture, his obsessive compulsion to fill the canvas with pattern, both organic and geometric. However. the first time I laid eyes on his landscapes, I was immediately intrigued. Depictions of the physical world seen through his eyes are almost reduced to abstraction. I try to emulate his style in the juxtaposition of various blocks, blobs, or blots of color to create a unifying whole. I've been accused of having a ‘talent for the tedious', though in the best way. I want you to get lost in my work."

That tedium of application that Bailey refers to gives a foundation to his work that sets him apart from other landscape artists. To paint nature is to connect with the environment in a meaningful way, and the pattern that Bailey is imposing finds a relationship in the constant and deeply layered reoccurrence of pattern in nature. In “King Tobacco” our eye falls from the clear blue sky, over distant trees and a vast field of plants, until it lands on the details of smaller plants and wild grass on the edge of the crop, an inexorable pull into the smaller and smaller biology that lies beneath. Bailey understanding of this inherent quality is so comprehensive, one wonders if Bailey has studied nature at a microscopic level.

Hometown: Columbus, Ohio
Education: BFA, The Ohio State University
Instagram: buckeyeartist                                              Scroll down for more images

"King Tobacco" by Brian Bailey, Oil on canvas, 26x30in, 2016, POR

"King Tobacco" by Brian Bailey, Oil on canvas, 26x30in, 2016, POR

"Barn at Sunset" by Brian Bailey, Oil on canvas, 8x10in, 2018, POR

"Barn at Sunset" by Brian Bailey, Oil on canvas, 8x10in, 2018, POR

"Shaker Village" by Brian Bailey, Oil on canvas, 16x20in, 2017, POR

"Shaker Village" by Brian Bailey, Oil on canvas, 16x20in, 2017, POR

"Yew Dell Too" by Brian Bailey, Oil on canvas, 11x14in, 2017, POR

"Yew Dell Too" by Brian Bailey, Oil on canvas, 11x14in, 2017, POR

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Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2018 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

Painting

Vignette: Barry Burcaw

"Pixilated" by Barry Burcaw, oil on canvas, 50x50in, 2-16, $2800

"Pixilated" by Barry Burcaw, oil on canvas, 50x50in, 2-16, $2800

Barry Burcaw studied graphic design in school, earning a degree from the University of Bridgeport, but he only began painting once he retired from a long, successful career in advertising. This provides an easy explanation of why his compositions are so dominated by forceful geometric structure and bold saturated colors.

Often the abstract images remain rooted in representational sources; Burcaw is fond of landscapes and architectural sources as a point of departure, but it is not unusual for him to veer into diagrammatical structures of pure pattern and shape. “Pixilated” does this, as does “Vernal Equinox”, even if the title makes explicit that the qualities of atmosphere and climate that we assume were in the artist’s mind here. The lower half containing dark grey and earth tones beneath the blue and yellow tones in the upper half cannot help but connote landscape, if only because our expectations fill in the blanks with little prompting – doesn’t the abstract artist appropriately depend on the viewer’s frame of reference?  “Solar Flares” is more obvious in its subject, placing a brilliant yellow orb in the center, and Burcaw’s curled linear forms representing the sun’s angry expression are more whimsical in their effect than the fiery astronomical phenomenon that provide the inspiration for the piece.

"Impressions of Santorini" by Barry Burcaw, oil on canvas, 50x50in, 2017, $3500

"Impressions of Santorini" by Barry Burcaw, oil on canvas, 50x50in, 2017, $3500

There is an unyielding exactitude in Burcaw’s work that suggests a highly structured perspective on the world at large. Perhaps this is a common underlying truth of any artist who utilizes geometry in such bold, almost confrontational terms.

Burcaw recently placed 4 paintings with Zephyr Gallery as part of their Corporate Art Program.

Hometown: Palisades, New York
Age: 74
Education: BS in Graphic Design, University of Bridgeport, CT

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"Vernal Equinox" by Barry Burcaw, oil on canvas, 50x50in, 2017, $2800

"Vernal Equinox" by Barry Burcaw, oil on canvas, 50x50in, 2017, $2800

"Solar Flares" by Barry Burcaw, oil on canvas, 50x50in, 2008 $3500

"Solar Flares" by Barry Burcaw, oil on canvas, 50x50in, 2008 $3500


Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

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Painting

Vignette: Victor Sweatt

"Chickasaw Park" by Victor Sweatt, 16x20in, oil on canvas, 2017, $750

"Chickasaw Park" by Victor Sweatt, 16x20in, oil on canvas, 2017, $750

Parks and Inspiration

For a painter interested in landscapes, Louisville’s celebrated park system offers a nearly inexhaustible series of locations. For Victor Sweatt, the beauty is in the commonplace paths open to all of the city’s population; the diverse range of sunlight and the prosaic quality of the trees, great and small, which shade the environment. Knowing the themes of spirituality and community that are dominant in his figurative work, it is but a small leap to imagine the artist sees nature as an extension of those very same ideas.

Recently, Sweatt completed two large scale paintings for the Slugger Museum in downtown Louisville that depict native son and World Champion Boxer Muhammad Ali on one, and Atlanta Braves legend and holder of the record for career home runs Hank Aaron on the other. Together the work is titled: “Ali & Aaron: United in the Fight”. He also won a design competition to paint an image for the Heritage West development in the Russell neighborhood of Louisville that will be displayed on a billboard.

 " Ali & Aaron: United In The Fight" by Victor Sweatt, acrylic on canvas, 2017, courtesy Slugger Museum.

 "Ali & Aaron: United In The Fight" by Victor Sweatt, acrylic on canvas, 2017, courtesy Slugger Museum.

Sweatt was born in Louisville. The oldest of three sons, Sweatt was raised in a single-family household. He has shown his work in group and solo exhibitions, and appears in public and private collections throughout the United States. In 2015, his work was included in the Louisville Visual Art exhibit, Presence and Place at Metro Hall in Louisville, KY.  Sweat is a signature member of the Louisville Visual Art, the Kentucky Artist Pastel Society, and the Kentucky Watercolor Society.

"A New Day is Dawning" by Victor Sweatt, 12x16in, acrylic on panel, 2017, $650

"A New Day is Dawning" by Victor Sweatt, 12x16in, acrylic on panel, 2017, $650

A long-time teacher and mentor for kids in west Louisville, Sweatt is currently seeking funding for "Speak Up", a children’s book that empowers them against child molestation, educating youth about the negative effects of under age drinking and setting positive goals.

Hometown: Louisville, Kentucky
Social Media: https://www.facebook.com/victor.sweatt

"Shawnee Park Trail" by Victor Sweatt, 8x10in, acrylic on canvas, 2017, $450

"Shawnee Park Trail" by Victor Sweatt, 8x10in, acrylic on canvas, 2017, $450

"Underpass" by Victor Sweatt, 11x14in, oil on panel, 2017, $650

"Underpass" by Victor Sweatt, 11x14in, oil on panel, 2017, $650

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

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Painting

Vignette: Joshua Jenkins

"Searching For Enlightenment" by Joshua Jenkins, 43 x 64 x 1 in, acrylic and mixed media on canvas (2017)

"Searching For Enlightenment" by Joshua Jenkins, 43 x 64 x 1 in, acrylic and mixed media on canvas (2017)


“Art to me is the soul’s communication - a response to experience and life.” — Joshua Jenkins


"Summertime Contemplation" by Joshua Jenkins, 24 x 18 x 1 in, acrylic and mixed media on canvas (2017)

"Summertime Contemplation" by Joshua Jenkins, 24 x 18 x 1 in, acrylic and mixed media on canvas (2017)

Like any good Expressionist, Joshua Jenkins builds an atmosphere divorced from recognizable reality, and then populates it with figures of solidity that are often indistinct, occupying space as a mass but lacking the specifics of individual character. There is some detail in the faces he attaches to these figures, often on necks that protrude forward, so that the features often give the impression of a mask. Oftentimes the only insight provide for these figures are what they are holding: a stringed instrument is a common item, or a particular hat might give us some clue about the personality. Jenkins is more concerned with the composition and action of the paint, using setting and placement to suggest narrative.

“Some of the works in the show, like 'Summertime Contemplation' & 'Searching for Enlightenment' are an obvious transition from the body of work from my show Somewhere In Between Anxiety & Serenity,” states Jenkins. “There a lot of the paintings had more muted colors and calmer lines. A lot of these newer pieces harken back to my earlier work, the bolder style with warmer colors that I’m known for.”

"Summer Heat (detail)" by Joshua Jenkins

"Summer Heat (detail)" by Joshua Jenkins

"Summer Nights" by Joshua Jenkins, 48 x 30 x 1.5 in, acrylic and mixed media on canvas (2017)

"Summer Nights" by Joshua Jenkins, 48 x 30 x 1.5 in, acrylic and mixed media on canvas (2017)

For many artists, the theme of summer would conjure up images of sunbaked landscapes, perhaps a beach-lined coastline - open areas of escape. But in “Summer Heat”, Jenkins captures the claustrophobic swelter of a crowded urban environment. This artist’s summer also include a domestic scene of four figures in a modern day family in “Summer Nights”, and the detail of the faces is noticeably more developed, with hair and facial details that suggest an element of autobiography in the scene. As most of the paintings show figures of some universality, here we get the sense that Jenkins knows these people, that this is his summer, and not necessarily anyone else’s.

Jenkins’ solo show, Summertime, will be opening at Lenihan Sotheby’s International Realty, 3803 Brownsboro Road, August 10 with an Artist’s Open House from 5:00pm-7:30pm.

Hometown: Poughkeepsie, NY
Age: 30
Education: BA in Digital Media with a Minor in Studio Art, Marist College (Poughkeepsie, New York)
Gallery Representative: Joshua is self-represented locally, but has works available at Revelry Gallery, KORE Gallery, New Editions Gallery (Lexington, KY), and at Caza Sikes (Cincinnati, OH)
Website: http://www.joshuajenkinsart.com

"Summer Heat" by Joshua Jenkins, 64 x 59 x 1 in, acrylic and mixed media on canvas (2016-2017)

"Summer Heat" by Joshua Jenkins, 64 x 59 x 1 in, acrylic and mixed media on canvas (2016-2017)

"Summer Nights (detail)" by Joshua Jenkins

"Summer Nights (detail)" by Joshua Jenkins

"Nature’s Musicians" by Joshua Jenkins, 36 x 48 x 1.5 in, acrylic and mixed media on canvas (2017)

"Nature’s Musicians" by Joshua Jenkins, 36 x 48 x 1.5 in, acrylic and mixed media on canvas (2017)

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

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Photography

Vignette: Marcia Lamont Hopkins


“Time, memory, and the natural world always play a key role in my work.” – Marcia Lamont Hopkins


Photographer, Marcia Hopkins

Photographer, Marcia Hopkins

By applying a poetic and often metaphorical language to her photographic images, Marcia Lamont Hopkins opens the door to the unknown, to multiple realities, both real and artificial, so that one questions what is really happening.

Her images establish a link between the landscape’s reality and the artist’s imagination. While this could, to some extent, be said to be true of any artist using landscapes, Hopkins pushes the limits of our perception of what is real. Each object or environment seems entirely natural and plausible, yet the juxtaposition within the artist’s gauzy, dreamlike atmosphere creates an uneasy sense of mystery. Is our understanding shifting in relationship to time, memory, or some other reality that we can’t quite define?

"Casaubon" by Marcia Hopkins, 17x22in, digital archival print (2017), $500 |    BUY NOW

"Casaubon" by Marcia Hopkins, 17x22in, digital archival print (2017), $500 | BUY NOW

In her artist’s statement, Hopkins explains it this way: “The series, Causabon’s Illusion, crafts a series of metaphorical vignettes rooted in elements of magical realism and the mind’s tendency to search for all-inclusive answers. In George Elliot’s Middlemarch, Edward Causabon spends his life in a futile and absurd attempt to find a comprehensive explanation for the whole of civilization’s knowledge and mythologies. Deluded, he believes that he alone has the key to humanity’s searching, an illusion which may be reflected in our culture today.”

"The Beekeeper" by Marcia Hopkins, 17x22in, digital archival print (2017), $500 |  BUY NOW

"The Beekeeper" by Marcia Hopkins, 17x22in, digital archival print (2017), $500 | BUY NOW

As part of her 60WRD/MIN project, Art Historian and Chicago Tribune art critic Lori Waxman wrote of Hopkin’s work: “We like to control animals and nature, but when they get beyond our understanding things tend to get interesting. Hopkins envisions overgrown forests, historic graveyards, farm animals, and occasionally people, often in combination, in impeccable digital prints that blend multiple shots into believable wholes. The weirder and more convincing, the better: a sheep enmeshed in a dense forest seems as if it and the trees are made of the same stuff, a lama in a rolling meadow becomes one with the horizon and the clouds.”

Hopkins currently has a solo exhibit at Gratz Park Inn in Lexington, KY.

*Burnaway: The Voice of Art In The South, March 27, 2017

Hometown: Lexington, Kentucky
Education: BFA in Film and Fine Art and a Ph.D. in Psychology.
Website: http://www.marcia-hopkins.squarespace.com/

"Cemetery Sheep" by Marcia Hopkins, 17x22in, digital archival print (2017), $500 |  BUY NOW

"Cemetery Sheep" by Marcia Hopkins, 17x22in, digital archival print (2017), $500 | BUY NOW

"Wedding" by Marcia Hopkins, 17x22in, digital archival print (2017), $500 |  BUY NOW

"Wedding" by Marcia Hopkins, 17x22in, digital archival print (2017), $500 | BUY NOW

"Pyramid" by Marcia Hopkins, 17x22in, digital archival print (2017), $500 |  BUY NOW

"Pyramid" by Marcia Hopkins, 17x22in, digital archival print (2017), $500 | BUY NOW

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

Are you interested in being on Artebella?  Click here  to learn more.

Are you interested in being on Artebella? Click here to learn more.