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Painting

Vignette: Kathie Daulton


“The bison struck me as moving mountains, impervious to time and elements.”
– Kathie Daulton


"Mountain Goes to Mohammed" by Kathie Daulton, 20x16in, oil on canvas (2017), $400 |  BUY NOW

"Mountain Goes to Mohammed" by Kathie Daulton, 20x16in, oil on canvas (2017), $400 | BUY NOW

Kathie Daulton believes the purpose of modern representational art is to stop time.  Arguably, any static image accomplishes this, but in “Museum Row” the street scene seems frozen, except for one figure allowed a sense of motion, a women in white and purple who might be in a world of her own at this moment, her penetration into the space so intentional as to make the rest of us feel as if we are standing still.

In “Mountain Goes to Muhammad,” the painter confronts the stoic gaze of a nearly immovable object, a massive bison on the American prairie. Time again stands still, but with an underlying tension in anticipation of what the monolithic creature might do next in the sunbaked landscape that was his domain long before humankind encroached.

That quality of immutability carries over into a painting of bicyclists. Intellectually, we know that they are in motion, yet the image arrests them sufficiently to suggest the figures moving slowly, with gravitas, as a herd of bison might move. The swift speed of the scene is downplayed in favor of what Daulton refers to as, “…some less definable essence of a moment.”

"Old Hippies" by Kathie Daulton, 20x16in, oil on canvas (2015), $300 |    BUY NOW

"Old Hippies" by Kathie Daulton, 20x16in, oil on canvas (2015), $300 | BUY NOW

Daulton has studied with local artists Rita Ford Jones, Joyce Sweet Bryant and Cathy Hillegas, and attended workshops with nationally acclaimed artists Judi Betts and John Michael Carter. She is an active member of the Floyd County Crit Club and Madison Art Club. She received a purchase award in the Ohio Valley Regional juried show in 2002, and a first in an annual Floyd County Crit Club show in 2013.

Daulton's work is displayed at Art on Main in Madison, Indiana.  She will also be exhibiting with other Floyd County Crit Club members during the month of September at Pearls on Pearl, New Albany.

Hometown: Charlestown, Indiana
Education: Self-Trained
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/At-the-Lake-Painting-278423408862954/

"Big Four Bikes" by Kathie Daulton, 20x16in, oil on canvas (2015), $300 |  BUY NOW

"Big Four Bikes" by Kathie Daulton, 20x16in, oil on canvas (2015), $300 | BUY NOW

"Big Four Bikes (detail)" by Kathie Daulton

"Big Four Bikes (detail)" by Kathie Daulton

"Museum Row" by Kathie Daulton, 16x20in, oil on canvas (2012), $300 |  BUY NOW

"Museum Row" by Kathie Daulton, 16x20in, oil on canvas (2012), $300 | BUY NOW

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

Are you interested in being on Artebella?  Click here  to learn more.

Are you interested in being on Artebella? Click here to learn more.

Photography

Vignette: Julius Friedman (1943-2017)

"Peony" by Julius Friedman, photography

"Peony" by Julius Friedman, photography

Artist, Julius Friedman. Photograph by Sarah Davis.

Artist, Julius Friedman. Photograph by Sarah Davis.

Once when Julius Friedman was delivering an informal lecture for Louisville Visual Art, he noted how the cover of his most recent book at the time, “Images & Ideas”, was a shot of the condensation on his shower door, and how he had once waited 2 hours for a car to move off a particularly fascinating oil and water puddle in a parking lot so he could photograph it.

Friedman’s images are characteristically so expertly constructed and expressive of a stringent graphic discipline that the randomness at the root of this anecdote seems surprising, but I think the lesson is that an artist does indeed see the world differently; at all times observing their environment on a fundamentally different level than the average citizen.

Art is communication, so if the ability to share that point-of-view is the most important measure of an artist, then Friedman must be counted as a Modern Master. His commercial work, most notably the posters that made him famous in the 1970’s, are brilliant in capturing the appeal of art in terms so vivid as to command the attention of all levels of society. In effect, he established a brand for the arts in Louisville, designing iconic images for so many important arts organizations: The Speed Museum, Louisville Visual Art, the Louisville Ballet, the Louisville Orchestra…the list goes on and on.

"Erica de La O 1" by Julius Friedman, 20x30in, photography printed on aluminum (2010)

"Erica de La O 1" by Julius Friedman, 20x30in, photography printed on aluminum (2010)

He did no less in his personal work, exploring technique on an esoteric level that always translated to fun and fascination for the viewer. He photographed Louisville Ballet dancer Eric De La O exhaustively but never exhausted the subject, producing dozens of potent images over several years. He photographed flowers, a prosaic and common subject that in Friedman’s hands become an astonishing example of his own relationship with nature. The same observation applies to his Becoming Wisteria series, images of model Alli Wiles positioned among the wisteria on his 200-acre farm.

"Toe On Egg" by Julius Friedman

"Toe On Egg" by Julius Friedman

In 2016, Frazier Museum in Louisville hosted a vital retrospective of Friedman’s work, showing more than 200 posters and also incorporating The Book, a project in which he deconstructed a collection of discarded books and which was his last published work. There was also a dazzling installation of color photographs on aluminum that, in and of itself was impressive enough to represent his creative vision, but what most excited the artist was an immersive screening of his most recent film work, flowing, abstract images of water in nature.

It was just water running in a stream – or it was simply peonies, or a painter’s palette, or an old book, but Julius Friedman always made us see the commonplace in a new light.

Hometown: Louisville, Kentucky
Website: http://www.imagesol.com

Nathan Felde, Fred DeSanto, and Julius Friedman (c.1970) outside Images studio. Photographer unknown, courtesy Tad DeSanto.

Nathan Felde, Fred DeSanto, and Julius Friedman (c.1970) outside Images studio. Photographer unknown, courtesy Tad DeSanto.

"Untitled #10" by Julius Friedman, 20x30in, photograph printed directly on raw aluminum (2015)

"Untitled #10" by Julius Friedman, 20x30in, photograph printed directly on raw aluminum (2015)

Book cover for "Images & Ideas" by Julius Friedman

Book cover for "Images & Ideas" by Julius Friedman

"Fresh Paint" by Julius Friedman, photography

"Fresh Paint" by Julius Friedman, photography

Artist, Julius Friedman. Photo courtesy of John Nation.

Artist, Julius Friedman. Photo courtesy of John Nation.

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved. 

Are you interested in being on Artebella?  Click here  to learn more.

Are you interested in being on Artebella? Click here to learn more.

Painting

Vignette: Corie Neumayer


“My current work reflects the changes in our climate and the effect on our earth.” Corie Neumayer


"Angry Wind" by Corie Neumayer, 24x36in, acrylic, latex (2017), $700 |  BUY NOW

"Angry Wind" by Corie Neumayer, 24x36in, acrylic, latex (2017), $700 | BUY NOW

Painter Corie Neumayer’s latest work is so much more emotional than the last time we saw her on Artebella. There was always signature mark making, but she has here cut loose from much of the intellectual discipline previously evident in her compositions in favor of a near-tempestuous brushwork of unusual vigor and expressiveness. As an artist, she seems riled up, even if her statement remains understated and reserved:

“I am a painter who creates abstracted paintings of the landscape that focus on open spaces; deserts, mountains, lakes, as well as the countryside of Kentucky and Indiana. My work is done in a variety of untraditional and traditional media. My current work reflects the changes in our climate and the effect on our earth.”

"Rain and Rain" by Corie Neumayer, 24x30in, acrylic, latex (2017), $600 |  BUY NOW

"Rain and Rain" by Corie Neumayer, 24x30in, acrylic, latex (2017), $600 | BUY NOW

The natural world has always played an important role in her work, but this new energy is forceful and imbued with what feels like anger, as Neumayer uses her art as a form of social activism. The turmoil below the surface of the image may not be as overt as marching with a sign because it works more subliminally, but the inference seems clear. The earth is in trouble, a highly volatile organism that has suffered enough abuse.  

As an educator, Neumayer helped create and develop the Visual Art Magnet program at DuPont Manual High School in Louisville and was a teacher in that program 1986-2004.

Neumayer has been a member of PYRO Gallery since 2005, and has a show on exhibit here now.

"Burnt Land" by Corie Neumayer, 18x24in, acrylic, latex (2017), $400 |  BUY NOW

"Burnt Land" by Corie Neumayer, 18x24in, acrylic, latex (2017), $400 | BUY NOW

The Changing Land – A Painting Exhibit by Corie Neumayer, with guest artist Matt Gaddie, runs through July 15, 2017.

Hometown: Louisville, Kentucky
Education: MA in Teaching, University of Louisville; BA, Georgetown College (Georgetown Kentucky); also attended Savannah College of Art and Design (Savannah, Georgia), California State University-Long Beach, and St. Cloud College (St. Cloud, Minnesota)
Gallery Representative: Pyro Gallery
Website: www.corieneumayerpaintings.com

"Crops on Fire" by Corie Neumayer, 24x36in, acrylic, latex (2017), $600 |  BUY NOW

"Crops on Fire" by Corie Neumayer, 24x36in, acrylic, latex (2017), $600 | BUY NOW

"Looks Like Snow Again" by Corie Neumayer, 24x36in, acrylic, latex (2017), $600 |  BUY NOW

"Looks Like Snow Again" by Corie Neumayer, 24x36in, acrylic, latex (2017), $600 | BUY NOW

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

Are you interested in being on Artebella?  Click here  to learn more.

Are you interested in being on Artebella? Click here to learn more.

Drawing

Vignette: Sarah Johnson


“Iconography has given me the opportunity to undergo a reflection and transformation…”
— Sarah Johnson


"The Holy Trinity" by Sarah Johnson, 14x22in, graphite on paper (2017)

"The Holy Trinity" by Sarah Johnson, 14x22in, graphite on paper (2017)

At this point, it is fair to say that all art speaks to tradition; even the most radical work usually sees Dadaism as an ancestor. There was a time when virtually the only way to make a living as an artist was to create religious imagery – the church was one of the only paying customers, and private collectors rarely wanted secular art, except for portraits. Iconography is not always religious, but the use of recurrent symbols and themes in churches arguably laid the foundation of how we think about such things. Sarah Johnson here picks up that tradition in designs that show fealty to the rigid, highly symmetrical compositional formula that were essential in this work, but with a soupcon of individual interpretation in the details of character.

“I have the opinion that art is supposed to reflect to its audience a message,” says Johnson. “I believe art has a very significant role to play in our daily and personal lives as well as having the capacity to influence our entire culture, spiritually and politically. The best examples of that kind of art have one thing in common: it touches the soul. I have a strong desire to share my belief and perspective and Iconography has given me the opportunity to undergo a reflection and transformation and to learn a time-tested medium. I aim to continue in my study in Iconography.”

So Johnson’s images are unabashedly ecclesiastical; a personal expression of spirituality rooted in the long and rich historical traditions employed by some of the greatest artists the world has known: Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael, not to mention untold numbers whose specific identity has been lost to time.

Hometown: Maysville, Kentucky
Age: 32
Education: Studied at the Art Academy of Cincinnati
Website: http://www.sarahcatherinejohnson.wordpress.com

"Christ Pantocrator" by Sarah Johnson, 14x22in, graphite on paper (2017)

"Christ Pantocrator" by Sarah Johnson, 14x22in, graphite on paper (2017)

"Archangel Michael" by Sarah Johnson, 14x22in, graphite on paper (2017)

"Archangel Michael" by Sarah Johnson, 14x22in, graphite on paper (2017)

"Saint Andrew" by Sarah Johnson, 14x22in, graphite on paper (2017)

"Saint Andrew" by Sarah Johnson, 14x22in, graphite on paper (2017)

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

Are you interested in being on Artebella?  Click here  to learn more.

Are you interested in being on Artebella? Click here to learn more.

Photography

Vignette: Kent Krugh


“The tools of the trade, having faithfully imaged for decades, have themselves been imaged.” — Kent Krugh


"Univex Mercury I Model CC" by Kent Krugh, 13x19in, x-ray archival pigment print (2016), $400 |  BUY NOW

"Univex Mercury I Model CC" by Kent Krugh, 13x19in, x-ray archival pigment print (2016), $400 | BUY NOW

Introspection, that ability for self-examination unique to humanity, is nothing new for an artist - It’s what lies at the core of many artists’ motivation.  In these new images from photographer Kent Krugh, he goes Meta with the concept, deconstructing the camera and pondering the essential nature of his equipment instead of himself.

“This work uses x-rays to explore the microevolution of cameras and is a metaphor about the limits of evolution. While form and media may have changed, the camera is still a camera: a tool to create images by capturing photons of light. Today’s sophisticated digital cameras look and operate far differently than the first cameras of the nineteenth century, however the essentials have not changed. The photographer points a contraption with a lens towards the subject to encode its likeness on a storage medium, be it film or digital sensor. And this contraption has been manufactured in many wonderful and clever designs, the complexity usually hidden inside. While making these x-rays, I have been surprised and astonished by what I found inside the cameras. The lens, when imaged from the side, contains a multi-element train of perfectly shaped glass forms whose purpose is to collect and direct light towards the target.

"Speed Graphic" by Kent Krugh, 13x19in,   x-ray archival pigment print (2016), $400 |  BUY NOW

"Speed Graphic" by Kent Krugh, 13x19in, x-ray archival pigment print (2016), $400 | BUY NOW

Speciation is the process where new species can arise when populations are reproductively isolated. The can be due to random mutations and natural selection, or hybridization between closely related species. This process has been documented by many and is difficult to deny. Many insist that this is indeed evidence of evolution in action—given enough time this same process has given rise to all forms of life on earth. And many also insist that this process can indeed produce species and variation within species, but this is the limit of evolution—no one has ever seen a dog produce a non-dog. So, to close the loop—a camera is still a camera, though tremendous diversity exists.

"Keystone K-8" by Kent Krugh, 13x19in, x-ray archival pigment print (2016), $400 |  BUY NOW

"Keystone K-8" by Kent Krugh, 13x19in, x-ray archival pigment print (2016), $400 | BUY NOW

In quite another sense, this project pays homage to the cameras I have owned, used, or handled. The tools of the trade, having faithfully imaged for decades, have themselves been imaged. The resulting images align with an inner desire to probe those unseen spaces and realms I sense exist, but do not observe with my eyes.”

Krugh’s work can be seen right now at the Cincinnati Art Galleries in the exhibit Return to Beauty: Asian Influence on Contemporary Landscape Art, March 3l April 22, and later this year at the Center for Fine Art Photography, Ft. Collins, Colorado in Black & White, which will run July 7-August 19.

In 2016, he was a part of, Inside the Gate, Museo de Artes Plásticas Eduardo Sívori, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Hometown: Cincinnati, Ohio
Age: 61
Education: MS, Radiological Sciences, University of Cincinnati, 1978 BA, Physics, Ohio Northern University, 1977
Gallery Representation: Gallery on Wade, Toronto, Ontario; Costello-Childs Gallery, Scottsdale, AZ; Gallery 708, Cincinnati, OH
Website: http://www.kentkrugh.com

"Nikon D300" by Kent Krugh, 13x19in, x-ray archival pigment print (2016), $400 |  BUY NOW

"Nikon D300" by Kent Krugh, 13x19in, x-ray archival pigment print (2016), $400 | BUY NOW

"Polaroid 440" by Kent Krugh, 13x19in, x-ray archival pigment print (2016), $400 |  BUY NOW

"Polaroid 440" by Kent Krugh, 13x19in, x-ray archival pigment print (2016), $400 | BUY NOW

"  Mamiyaflex C2" by Kent Krugh, 13x19in, x-ray archival pigment print (2016), $400 |  BUY NOW

"Mamiyaflex C2" by Kent Krugh, 13x19in, x-ray archival pigment print (2016), $400 | BUY NOW

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

Are you interested in being on Artebella?    Click here    to learn more.

Are you interested in being on Artebella? Click here to learn more.