emotion

Painting

Vignette: William Pichette


What portions of our self do we edit, manipulate, and hide from view for the greater good of likes and followers? – William Pichette


"Under Control" by William Pichette, 8x20in, acrylic on printed canvas (2016), $210 |  BUY NOW

"Under Control" by William Pichette, 8x20in, acrylic on printed canvas (2016), $210 | BUY NOW

William Pichette is a painter who sees the inherent qualities of his medium as integral to expressing the themes in the imagery. In his own words: “The thrill of the acrylic paint medium comes from how quick you must work to create. The paint dries very fast but each attempt at progress easily hides the previous attempts. Hiding ourselves proves more difficult. Once we reveal our truths through action and speech, it is not so easily undone. In a world where compliance and filtering our daily expression is the norm, muting the brilliance of our emotion is preferred, and it would be an outrageous offense to demonstrate weakness, vulnerability, honesty—humanity—I cherish in sight of visibility.”

Pichette often sets his figures against patterned backgrounds, the human a silhouette initiating a conversation with negative space, full of emotional suggestion, signs and portents.

“My pieces are inspired both by how we see and how we are seen. How do we see ourselves behind closed doors, looking in vanity mirrors, and through the lenses of our Instagram and Snapchat feed? What portions of our self do we edit, manipulate, and hide from view for the greater good of likes and followers? Those raw bits; the understanding of ourselves we hold so true that we would hate for others to see. Those nuances draw my focus; typically not blemishes and physical flaws of our outward appearance, but parts of our body none-the-less. They are the fights with mental illness and turmoil of thought, our agitation and need for direction, the imprints of the souls of others and the scars of love lost.”

Pichette just participated in 2017 Group Exhibition, Queer Voices, at Open Community Arts Center, Louisville, KY.

Age: 25
Hometown: Austin, Texas
Education: Bachelor of Liberal Arts in Ethnic Studies (Asian-American Studies), University of Texas
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/Shquiggles/

"Impressionable Young Minds - Christine" by William Pichette, 8x10in, acrylic and ink on canvas (2016), $140 |  BUY NOW

"Impressionable Young Minds - Christine" by William Pichette, 8x10in, acrylic and ink on canvas (2016), $140 | BUY NOW

"Wanderlust" by William Pichette, 8x10in, acrylic and ink on canvas (2016), $140 |  BUY NOW

"Wanderlust" by William Pichette, 8x10in, acrylic and ink on canvas (2016), $140 | BUY NOW

"Impressionable Young Minds - Will" by William Pichette, 8x10in, acrylic and ink on canvas (2016), $140 |  BUY NOW

"Impressionable Young Minds - Will" by William Pichette, 8x10in, acrylic and ink on canvas (2016), $140 | BUY NOW

"See and Be Seen" by William Pichette, 8x10in, acrylic and ink on canvas (2015), $110 |  BUY NOW

"See and Be Seen" by William Pichette, 8x10in, acrylic and ink on canvas (2015), $110 | BUY NOW

"Turbulent Thought" by William Pichette, 18x18in, acrylic on wood board (2016), $375 |    BUY NOW

"Turbulent Thought" by William Pichette, 18x18in, acrylic on wood board (2016), $375 | BUY NOW

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved. 

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Painting, Drawing

Feature: 2017 Academy of LVA Seniors, Part 2 of 2


“I learned so much that helped me to become a better artist.” — Mayteana Williams


Student, Mayteana Williams working on a drawing.

Student, Mayteana Williams working on a drawing.

The art of youth is often the transition between the joyful, unfettered creativity of a child, and the first deliberate intention of an adult artist. The senior students departing the Academy of LVA for college in the fall have discovered that they have something to say to the world, and they are choosing to say it through art.

Moving from the idealized and fantastical images of children from Mayteana Williams, to the more polished and well-observed self-portraits and startlingly brutal scene pulled from archetypal childhood we find in the work of Madison McGill, we get some understanding of how young artist may surprise us with caustic social commentary or reach beyond the obvious assumptions of perceived cultural identity. Then Katie Montgomery shows a full embrace of Expressionism and an authoritative command of her medium in capturing raw human emotion. A child’s first art making is fundamental expression of their emotional being – the elemental satisfaction of finger paints, and Montgomery reconnects to that need.

Mayteana Williams – CFAC/Academy student for 8 years
Has been accepted to Spalding University for their college of art and design.

“I am grateful to William Duffy in sculpture, because I had never done that before, and Dennis Whitehouse, because I learned so much that helped me to become a better artist.”

Work by Mayteana Williams

Work by Mayteana Williams

Madison McGill – Scholastic Silver Key
Will be attending the University of Kentucky to major in Studio Arts.

“I learned a lot from Wilma Bethel and we had some great conversations. She has such a loving heart for every one of her students and is an outstanding artist! It was my pleasure to learn from such an amazing woman. Jean Smith was also an amazing teacher. When I started the mural, she graciously took me under her wing and assisted me in any questions I had for her. This was my first mural and without her encouragement and guidance, I don't know if I could've completed it. Both of these wonderful ladies have impacted my life greatly and have taught me so, so much. I would definitely recommend LVA to someone with an interest in art!”

Work by Madison McGill

Work by Madison McGill

Katie Montgomery
Has been accepted into and will attend The School of the Art Institute of Chicago on a scholarship.

“Classes with LVA/CFAC have made me the incredible artist and person that I am today. I've learned everything that I know from being taught and influenced by their teachers, especially Dennis Whitehouse.”

Work by Katie Montgomery

Work by Katie Montgomery

These students, and others, have created small-scale work especially for The Academy of LVA exhibition, which will be at Revelry Boutique Gallery May 19 – May 25. There will be an Opening Reception May 19, 6-8pm.

Revelry Boutique Gallery
742 E. Market Street

Gallery Hours
Tuesday – Saturday, 11am-7pm
Sunday & Monday, 11am-5pm

Work by Mayteana Williams

Work by Mayteana Williams

Work by Katie Montgomery

Work by Katie Montgomery

Work by Madison McGill

Work by Madison McGill

Work by Mayteana Williams

Work by Mayteana Williams

Work by Katie Montgomery

Work by Katie Montgomery

Work by Madison McGill   

Work by Madison McGill
 


This Feature article was written by Keith Waits.
In addition to his work at the LVA, Keith is also the Managing Editor of a website, www.Arts-Louisville.com, which covers local visual arts, theatre, and music in Louisville.


 Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

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Mixed Media

Q&A: Deborah Stanley


“Experience will be more valuable than anything learned in the classroom.”
— Deborah Stanley


Artist Deborah Stanley

Artist Deborah Stanley

Deborah Stanley has been a juried member of the Louisville Artisans Guild (LAG) since 2011 and a member of the Louisville Visual Art (LVA) since 2014 and have been a participatant in the Art[squared] project since its inception.  Her work has been displayed and featured in various art galleries and exhibitions in the Louisville area such as LAG 2016 Holiday Showcase and 2016 Annual Exhibit; Kaviar Forge and Gallery (Touched with Fire, 2016 and The Figure Revealed, 2014, juried participant); Gallery 104 in La Grange, KY (the 2014 Red Show, juried participant), 2013 Crafts of Kentucky Exhibition, (juried participant), JCC Patio Gallery Presents Louisville Artisans Guild, 2013, the 2012 and 2013 Brown-Foreman Annual Pride Fair, The KORE Gallery (former partner), 2012 September Art Fair Mellwood Art Center, juried participant, Louisville Artisans Guild Annual Art Exhibit, and The Women's Club of Louisville (2012 Annual No-Jury Art Show).

When did you first think you would be an artist?

2004

Who or what inspires you now?

Beautiful and colorful visual imagery in nature or photo images  

"Lukas" by Deborah Stanley, 8x10in, polymer clay (2016) $350 |  BUY NOW

"Lukas" by Deborah Stanley, 8x10in, polymer clay (2016) $350 | BUY NOW

Your work is unique, and blurs many lines. How did you come to work with polymer clay?

I was working on an art project with my young son and needed something different and colorful that would be easy enough for a child to make into simple shapes. However, I found an immediate connection and affinity for the feel of the clay and the endless possibilities I saw when the colors are blended. 

You describe yourself as an “abstract expressionist,” yet the images also contain representational figures and faces – talk about how you balance the two strains in your work?

I strive to express an emotion or feeling with every piece I create. While many of my creations contain representational figures and faces, my concentration is on communicating emotion or feeling rather than trying to create a technically correct replica of a particular subject. I would say my balance of the two strains is giving just enough technical detail to capture the essence of the subject and let abstract expressionism take over from there.

"  Gypsy Dancer" by Deborah Stanley, 9x12in, polymer clay (2016) $425 |  BUY NOW

"Gypsy Dancer" by Deborah Stanley, 9x12in, polymer clay (2016) $425 | BUY NOW

If you could do anything else but make art, what would it be?

Photography. I have always had a passion for photography and previously owned and operated a photography business specializing in wedding and family photographs.

What frightens you the most?

Bugs!

What challenges you more than anything?

Coloring within the lines.

What is your favorite music to listen to when making art?

R&B/hip hop/rap/oldies/pop  

Vinyl or CD?

iTunes - Sorry but if I have to choose between the two, it would be CD

What advice would you give a young artist just out of college?

Experience will be more valuable than anything learned in the classroom. Keep working and never feel like you've "arrived". You will always improve if you keep working.

Tell us about an important moment of transition for you as an artist?

For my first several years as an artist, I exclusively created abstract designs, always determined to "let go/let flow" with the clay. A few years ago, I accepted a commission, which required the inclusion of a representational figure. This commission challenged me to find the most creative way to express freedom while meeting the requirement of my client. This was a pivotal moment for me and gave me the outlet to express myself or an idea or feeling in every piece I now create.

"Sheba" by Deborah Stanley, 9x12in, polymer clay (2016) $425 |  BUY NOW

"Sheba" by Deborah Stanley, 9x12in, polymer clay (2016) $425 | BUY NOW

How do you feel about local art scene in Louisville? What would you change about it?

I love the art scene in Louisville. As a transplant from the Washington, DC area, I was pleasantly surprised at how art friendly Louisville is. Just walking downtown and admiring the artistic bike racks and generations of "Gallopalooza" horse statues is always entertaining. There are plenty of galleries and venues that are very welcoming for local artists of all levels. I wouldn't change a thing.

Has your style changed or evolved over the years? If so what do you think influenced this?

Yes. As I described above, my style has evolved from strictly abstract, to Abstract Expressionism utilizing representational figures or faces. It was a required element in a new commission, so I had to give it a try and have not looked back!

MV5BMzMzNzU0NzQ1NF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwNTMzOTEzMQ@@._V1_SY1000_SX670_AL_.jpg

Favorite movie?

"Something New"

If you could meet any celebrity who would it be and what would you ask them?

Boy George. I would ask him where his courage comes from to have demanded to live and look his own way since childhood. His love of freedom and honest way of expressing himself has always been an inspiration to me.

Hometown: Silver Spring, Maryland
Age: 52
Education: Studied Business Administration and Sociology at Montgomery College in Rockville, MD
Website: http://www.aegalleryshop.com

"Color Chameleon" by Deborah Stanley, 9x12in, polymer clay (2016) $425 |  BUY NOW

"Color Chameleon" by Deborah Stanley, 9x12in, polymer clay (2016) $425 | BUY NOW

"The People's Champ" by Deborah Stanley, 9x12in, polymer clay (2016)

"The People's Champ" by Deborah Stanley, 9x12in, polymer clay (2016)

"The Purplest" by Deborah Stanley, 11x142in, polymer clay (2016), $500   |  BUY NOW

"The Purplest" by Deborah Stanley, 11x142in, polymer clay (2016), $500 | BUY NOW

Entire contents copyright © 2016 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

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Digital, Illustration

Q&A: Illustrator Scott Soeder

Photograph of artist Scott Soeder at work.

Photograph of artist Scott Soeder at work.


"Art means me. It is my personal visual language for communicating my ideas and getting lost in my thoughts." — Scott Soeder


Various vehicle illustrations by Scott Soeder.

Scott Soeder is an award-winning professional illustrator and designer specializing in illustrations for children's books, magazines, apps and games. Select clients include Highlights for Children, Timehop, Lightchange Studios, Reelio Inc, 311, Lake Street Dive, Sharks 4 Kids and more. A graduate of the University of Louisville, he is based in based in Louisville, KY.

When did you first think you would be an artist?

I can’t say there was any defining moment. I have been drawing as long as I can remember, as if I’m simply naturally attracted to do so. Maybe we all are and for whatever reason some of us move away from it. I played football on a team when I was a kid, but by the time I got to high school I had very little interest in playing. Maybe art is like that for others. Also I was a scrawny kid, even in high school, and I knew I would end up a small pile of broken bones had I attempted to play.  I was very fortunate to have parents who kept me stocked in art supplies and who encouraged me. I absolutely adored looking at and reading “Peanuts” in the newspaper and watching Bugs Bunny cartoons. Animation and comics were my experience with art. When I was around 7 or 8 or some age expressed in a single digit, my grandfather made me an easel. I would sit for hours drawing at that easel. I remember feeling like a real artist working at that easel. At an early age I was equipped with art supplies, had a paying customer and friends referred to me as a “good drawer” So artist was added to my list of “what I want to be when I grow up” directly under Astronaut and Spiderman. 

Is all your work for clients?

Being a full-time artist means that a big chunk of what I create is for clients. However, I do spend time working on pieces for fun, to experiment, or for personal projects. I have been working on illustrating a series of vehicles from pop culture titled Pop Wheels for fun and to give my self a challenge. I have done about 16 and have a long list of others I’d like to do. Also, I work on writing and illustrating my own stories for children’s picture books.

What frightens you the most?

That’s a great question and probably depends on the moment I’m asked. An overarching, big-picture-thought that comes to mind is - being forgotten. That my little blip of time on the planet being Scott Soeder was wasted and that I didn’t use everything I’d been given to the fullest. I want to be able to leave something behind that my children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren could say: “my dad did that”. Besides my children themselves of course, they are my best creations. But in terms of art, Charles Schulz lives in Charlie Brown and will continue to for generations, possibly inspiring other kids to pick up a pencil and draw. That’s an amazing accomplishment.

What is your favorite music to listen to when making art?

Something upbeat and rocking. The list of specific artists would be long! I love music and enjoy listening to it while working. I’d say most of the time it would be music from 311 or pop metal bands from the 80s. 

What are you reading right now?

I’ve been reading Chuck Jones’ autobiography, “Chuck Amuck”. I love looking at his drawings in the book and it is really funny. I would have loved to meet him. I bet he was hilarious. 

What advice would you give a young artist just out of college?

Learn about business and develop your business acumen. Educate yourself on all the opportunities available for artists. Put in the work. 

Tell us about an important moment of transition for you as an artist?

I feel like every moment is one of transition. It is persistent evolution. Always striving to express the emotion or develop the image I see in my head. There are moments or milestone pieces if you will. The ones where something clicked or a visual problem was solved or it made someone laugh, etc. Some of my favorite moments are getting an email or message from someone who really enjoyed a piece and took the time to say so. 

What does art mean to you?

Art feels like a part of me. It has been tied up in my identity for as long as I remember. Art has been the means of showing others ideas in my mind, of depicting humor and simply passing time. When I was a kid my sister had dance lessons and I would bring a sketchbook and art supplies with me to stay occupied. I don’t know what I would have done without it. A great benefit of art is that I am never bored! Art means me. It is my personal visual language for communicating my ideas and getting lost in my thoughts. 

soeder-animal-swim-party.png

If you could have a talent that you currently don't already have what would it be and why?

I would like to be able to sing. Being able to sing like Steve Perry from Journey would be nice. I play drums and can hold my own on a few other instruments like guitar and bass, but I lack a singing voice. A rusty muffler being drug down a gravel road would sound more pleasant. I have a personal project where I am playing and recording all the instruments myself and having a decent singing voice would be advantageous. 

If you could meet any celebrity who would it be and what would you ask them?

If it could be anyone even if they were deceased it would be Charles Schulz. If it were a contemporary it would be John Lasseter. I would ask Charles Schulz about his work ethic and productivity tips. He drew every single Peanuts strip himself for 50 years. He’d have to have some awesome tips! I would ask John Lasseter about storytelling and creating great characters. Pixar has had an amazing track record of doing both. 

Name: Scott Soeder
Hometown: Louisville, Kentucky
Age: 43
Education: BFA in Communication Art & Design, Magna Cum Laude, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky
Website: http://www.scottsoeder.com

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Entire contents copyright © 2016 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

Please contact    josh@louisvillevisualart.org    for further information on advertising through Artebella.

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