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Mixed Media

Vignette: Ann Stewart Anderson

"Callie" by Ann Stewart Anderson, 16x12in, cut paper mosaic (2017)

"Callie" by Ann Stewart Anderson, 16x12in, cut paper mosaic (2017)

The Answer Is Sisterhood

It was recently announced that Anderson is one of the recipients of the 2017 Al Smith Fellowship. The prestigious award, named in honor of former arts council chair and Kentucky journalist Al Smith, recognizes professional artists who have reached a high level of achievement in their careers. Since its beginning in 1983, the program has provided more than $2.5 million in funding to artists in the visual arts, literary arts, media arts, composing and choreography. In this round of funding, the fellowships were awarded to artists in the choreography and literary arts disciplines.

Ann Stewart Anderson has been working with assemblage techniques through the use of various media for several years, but most recently she has been using paper, specifically images and textures pulled from art magazines. Now she utilizes the approach in a new series that seems consistent with the style and themes of the Wonderful Old Women (W.O.W.) series, yet there is a new political commentary that has come into play.

“It has been almost a year since I got the idea of creating Sisters,” explains Anderson. “Since then I have made seven TEFFUBUD sisters, three GAMTRA sisters, four NACIREMA sisters, three DEMARF sisters, and I am just now putting the final touches on the last group of as yet unnamed sisters.”

“This new concept pushes me to develop more complex images. The NACIREMA sisters, (Hint: read it backwards), inspired by a portrait of Donald Trump illustrated in  last November’s Art In America, is a visual statement about presidential politics. Each woman represents an American state: Minnie, Minnesota; Dela, Delaware; Flora, Florida and Callie, California. All are dressed in black and, hidden away in the composition there are upside down American flags. And, as you can see, all have some characteristics of the face of Trump which literally is under the transforming layers of paper glued over it to create these sisters. I will continue to make more siblings as long as I can find inspiration and material, which is pretty easy thanks to my local bookshop and friends for whom I am delighted to recycle their discarded art magazines.”  

"Dela" by Ann Stewart Anderson, 16x12in, cut paper mosaic (2017)

"Dela" by Ann Stewart Anderson, 16x12in, cut paper mosaic (2017)

The use of the inverted flag references the U.S. military protocol for flying the flag upside down as a warning to approaching troops. In the past, Anderson, has expressed social commentary through the use of Classical Mythology in her paintings, almost always with a vital feminist undercurrent, yet the political message in these images is expressed with even greater subtlety. Anderson’s use of collage has developed even more, with some of the textures and compositions in “Dela”, for example, recalling her previous work with mosaics. 

Anderson ‘s new series is making its public debut in Sisters: A Family Resemblance, a solo show concurrent with the Painting II show at Galerie Hertz, both running through September 2, 2017.

"Moira" by Ann Stewart Anderson, 16x12in, cut paper mosaic (2017)

"Moira" by Ann Stewart Anderson, 16x12in, cut paper mosaic (2017)

 Anderson’s work can be found in several corporate collections including:

Drake Hotel, Chicago
Turtle Wax Company, Chicago
Hyatt Regency Hotel, Louisville
Brown Foreman Distillers
Atlantic Richfield Corporation
Evansville Museum of Arts and Science
Alabama Power Company
Central Bank, Lexington
Hilliard Lyons, Louisville
Cleveland Clinic
Makers Mark Distillery

Hometown: Louisville, Kentucky
Age: 82
Education: BA, Wellesley College, MA, American University
Gallery Representative: Galerie Hertz (Louisville)
Website: http://www.annstewartanderson.com

"Enid" by Ann Stewart Anderson, 16x12in, cut paper mosaic (2017)

"Enid" by Ann Stewart Anderson, 16x12in, cut paper mosaic (2017)

"Minnie" by Ann Stewart Anderson, 16x12in, cut paper mosaic (2017)

"Minnie" by Ann Stewart Anderson, 16x12in, cut paper mosaic (2017)

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

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Photography

Vignette: Charles Mintz


“Hardware stores are about self-reliance and culture that values results rather than shiny new things. In today’s world, they are survivors.” — Charles Mintz


"Cedar Center Hardware" by Charles Mintz, 32 x 40in, Inkjet Print From Scanned FIlm (2015), $1000 |  BUY NOW

"Cedar Center Hardware" by Charles Mintz, 32 x 40in, Inkjet Print From Scanned FIlm (2015), $1000 | BUY NOW

As we make the world shiny and new with urban renewal and fashionable shopping malls, there is still a network of old-fashioned hardware stores located in American communities. The counters are aged; once sharp corners worn to a nub, yellowed tile floors, the glare of fluorescent lights on plastic packaged merchandise filling every square inch of space, so that the color of the walls remain a mystery. Photographer Charles Mintz has been documenting these archetypal exemplars of the American character for the last few years, searching out the rustic and utilitarian businesses wherever he travels.

As is his custom, Mintz uses a large format film camera with interior exposures ranging from one to six minutes. He explains how it serves to break the ice with his subjects:  “Though ungainly, the camera is appreciated by the owners, who gave their permission for the project, and allows some control over focus and perspective. The project is a continuation of work exploring the Great American Dream and the meaning of home. Hardware stores are where we go to fix things - to make things. They are about self-reliance and culture that values results rather than shiny new things. In today’s world, they are survivors.”

"  Heuser Hardware" by Charles Mintz, 32 x 40in, Inkjet Print From Scanned FIlm (2016), $1000 |  BUY NOW

"Heuser Hardware" by Charles Mintz, 32 x 40in, Inkjet Print From Scanned FIlm (2016), $1000 | BUY NOW

“All of my work is about things that are important to me. It is built around my biography but is not about me. Rather it is about the culture of my time and place. It is intended to make you feel and to make you think, though it is not didactic. While this project is not traditional portraiture, it pictures the people that own, operate and shop in these stores. In addition, we can see both common elements and hints of where we are. There is a sense of belonging, a sense of place. To the extent possible, I want the subjects to speak for themselves with a minimum of my interpretation.”

Since becoming a full time photographer in 2008, Mintz has explored portraiture through objects and locations: The Album Project, Precious Objects and, still in progress, Costumes. Even Every Place – I Have Ever Lived, where people in the images are largely unrecognizable, is uniquely personal, beginning with my childhood home that was in foreclosure and continuing in all my lifetime neighborhoods the work has become less traditionally photographic both in form and method.

"  Hollywood Hardware" by Charles Mintz, 32 x 40in, Inkjet Print From Scanned FIlm (2016), $1000 |  BUY NOW

"Hollywood Hardware" by Charles Mintz, 32 x 40in, Inkjet Print From Scanned FIlm (2016), $1000 | BUY NOW

Mintz was Artist in Residence at the Kala Art Institute in Berkeley CA in March 2016, and he was was awarded an Ohio Arts Council Individual Excellence Award for 2015. His work can be found in museums, including the Smithsonian Museum of American History, private and corporate collections in North America, Europe and Asia.

Trillium Books, an imprint of The Ohio State University Press, published his latest book, “Lustron Stories”, in 2016. The Lustron series was exhibited at LVA’s PUBLIC Gallery in Louisville in 2015.

Hometown: Cleveland, Ohio
Age: 69
Education: Mintz studied photography at Maine Photographic Workshop, Parsons School of Design, the International Center for Photography, Lakeland Community College and Cuyahoga Community College. He has a BSEE from Purdue University and an MSEE from Cleveland State University.
Gallery Representation: 1point618 Gallery
Website: www.chuckmintz.com

"  Krays Hardware" by Charles Mintz, 32 x 40in, Inkjet Print From Scanned FIlm (2015), $1000 |  BUY NOW

"Krays Hardware" by Charles Mintz, 32 x 40in, Inkjet Print From Scanned FIlm (2015), $1000 | BUY NOW

"  Rodeo Hardware" by Charles Mintz, 32 x 40in, Inkjet Print From Scanned FIlm (2016), $1000 |  BUY NOW

"Rodeo Hardware" by Charles Mintz, 32 x 40in, Inkjet Print From Scanned FIlm (2016), $1000 | BUY NOW

"  Rutledge Hardware" by Charles Mintz, 32 x 40in, Inkjet Print From Scanned FIlm (2015), $1000 |  BUY NOW

"Rutledge Hardware" by Charles Mintz, 32 x 40in, Inkjet Print From Scanned FIlm (2015), $1000 | BUY NOW

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2016 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

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Mixed Media

Vignette: Steve Heine

“Sweet Camille’s Halo” by Steve Heine, 18x18x2in, laser-cut steel, blue handblown sheet glass, poplar, one of a series of “Cloud Panels” (2015), $2700 |  BUY NOW

“Sweet Camille’s Halo” by Steve Heine, 18x18x2in, laser-cut steel, blue handblown sheet glass, poplar, one of a series of “Cloud Panels” (2015), $2700 | BUY NOW

Steve Heine is the owner of Cranium Glass in Louisville, Kentucky, where he is also the chief designer. Although trained as an architect, his work is primarily commissioned art glass for individual and corporate clients.

“Stained glass—composed of glass, paint and metal [lead]—is the prototypical architectural glass form. Currently, I’m working on a fresh approach to architectural glass using these same materials—hand blown sheet glass, paint [stark white metal primer] and metal [laser-cut steel]. My “Cloud Panels” [like stained glass] are designed to be illuminated by the sun. I’m particularly fascinated by the wash of color across steel. I’m working primarily with blue, violet, amber or green hand blown sheet glass for each of my “Cloud Panels”.

“I’m trying to transition to some smaller pieces and gallery sales. However, the high cost of my materials creates a bit of a dilemma for me. So, I’m trying to sell these new "Cloud Panels" by way of a concept drawing and a paper study model [8” x 8”] and images of past, completed pieces. Once a concept is commissioned, I can then make the piece in my studio.”

“Lucent Cloud” (concept drawing on left) by Steve Heine, 18x18x2in, laser-cut steel, blue handblown sheet glass, poplar, one of a series of “Cloud Panels” (2016), $2700 |  BUY NOW

“Lucent Cloud” (concept drawing on left) by Steve Heine, 18x18x2in, laser-cut steel, blue handblown sheet glass, poplar, one of a series of “Cloud Panels” (2016), $2700 | BUY NOW

Of course the final glass version is what both artist and viewer are drawn to, yet the minimalist clarity of Heine’s paper models is notable, a clean, simple aesthetic with an appeal all its own. While we envision an artist’s preparation as furiously scribbling on a pad, hands dirty with charcoal or chalk, the architect’s approach is on display here; the merging of the artist’s creativity with the practical functionality of an engineer. 

“Buoyancy” by Steve Heine, paper study model (2016) |  A  vailable for Commission

“Buoyancy” by Steve Heine, paper study model (2016) | Available for Commission

During 2016, Heine’s work was accepted in three juried exhibitions: 

•Louisville Visual Art & University of Louisville’s Hite Institute’s Open Studio Weekend Exhibition, juried exhibition, Cressman Center for the Visual Arts, Louisville, KY
Gathering: Contemporary Glass from the Heartland, juried exhibition “featuring the best of emerging and established glass artists from Indiana, Illinois, Ohio, Michigan, Kentucky and Wisconsin—the heartland of America”, Muncie, IN
• Merit Award in Bluegrass Biennial: A Kentucky Juried Exhibition, Morehead, KY

Heine is now a member of PYRO Gallery in Louisville, and will be featured in the PYRO New Members Show, January 5 through February 11, 2017.

Hometown: Louisville, Kentucky
Age: 55
Education: BA, Architecture, University of Kentucky, 1996; 
Website: http://www.craniumglass.squarespace.com/

“For My Brother, Gary, Who Is Much Older Than Me” by Steve Heine, 7x5(d) in, cast glass [lost-wax process], lathe-turned Kentucky black walnut. The wax positive for the glass was slowly turned by hand on a wood lathe. One of a series of “Wood Lathe Vessels”, NFS

“For My Brother, Gary, Who Is Much Older Than Me” by Steve Heine, 7x5(d) in, cast glass [lost-wax process], lathe-turned Kentucky black walnut. The wax positive for the glass was slowly turned by hand on a wood lathe. One of a series of “Wood Lathe Vessels”, NFS

A wax model for one of Steve Heine's “Wood Lathe Vessels”

A wax model for one of Steve Heine's “Wood Lathe Vessels”

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Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2016 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

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