complex

Mixed Media

Vignette: Ann Stewart Anderson

"Callie" by Ann Stewart Anderson, 16x12in, cut paper mosaic (2017)

"Callie" by Ann Stewart Anderson, 16x12in, cut paper mosaic (2017)

The Answer Is Sisterhood

It was recently announced that Anderson is one of the recipients of the 2017 Al Smith Fellowship. The prestigious award, named in honor of former arts council chair and Kentucky journalist Al Smith, recognizes professional artists who have reached a high level of achievement in their careers. Since its beginning in 1983, the program has provided more than $2.5 million in funding to artists in the visual arts, literary arts, media arts, composing and choreography. In this round of funding, the fellowships were awarded to artists in the choreography and literary arts disciplines.

Ann Stewart Anderson has been working with assemblage techniques through the use of various media for several years, but most recently she has been using paper, specifically images and textures pulled from art magazines. Now she utilizes the approach in a new series that seems consistent with the style and themes of the Wonderful Old Women (W.O.W.) series, yet there is a new political commentary that has come into play.

“It has been almost a year since I got the idea of creating Sisters,” explains Anderson. “Since then I have made seven TEFFUBUD sisters, three GAMTRA sisters, four NACIREMA sisters, three DEMARF sisters, and I am just now putting the final touches on the last group of as yet unnamed sisters.”

“This new concept pushes me to develop more complex images. The NACIREMA sisters, (Hint: read it backwards), inspired by a portrait of Donald Trump illustrated in  last November’s Art In America, is a visual statement about presidential politics. Each woman represents an American state: Minnie, Minnesota; Dela, Delaware; Flora, Florida and Callie, California. All are dressed in black and, hidden away in the composition there are upside down American flags. And, as you can see, all have some characteristics of the face of Trump which literally is under the transforming layers of paper glued over it to create these sisters. I will continue to make more siblings as long as I can find inspiration and material, which is pretty easy thanks to my local bookshop and friends for whom I am delighted to recycle their discarded art magazines.”  

"Dela" by Ann Stewart Anderson, 16x12in, cut paper mosaic (2017)

"Dela" by Ann Stewart Anderson, 16x12in, cut paper mosaic (2017)

The use of the inverted flag references the U.S. military protocol for flying the flag upside down as a warning to approaching troops. In the past, Anderson, has expressed social commentary through the use of Classical Mythology in her paintings, almost always with a vital feminist undercurrent, yet the political message in these images is expressed with even greater subtlety. Anderson’s use of collage has developed even more, with some of the textures and compositions in “Dela”, for example, recalling her previous work with mosaics. 

Anderson ‘s new series is making its public debut in Sisters: A Family Resemblance, a solo show concurrent with the Painting II show at Galerie Hertz, both running through September 2, 2017.

"Moira" by Ann Stewart Anderson, 16x12in, cut paper mosaic (2017)

"Moira" by Ann Stewart Anderson, 16x12in, cut paper mosaic (2017)

 Anderson’s work can be found in several corporate collections including:

Drake Hotel, Chicago
Turtle Wax Company, Chicago
Hyatt Regency Hotel, Louisville
Brown Foreman Distillers
Atlantic Richfield Corporation
Evansville Museum of Arts and Science
Alabama Power Company
Central Bank, Lexington
Hilliard Lyons, Louisville
Cleveland Clinic
Makers Mark Distillery

Hometown: Louisville, Kentucky
Age: 82
Education: BA, Wellesley College, MA, American University
Gallery Representative: Galerie Hertz (Louisville)
Website: http://www.annstewartanderson.com

"Enid" by Ann Stewart Anderson, 16x12in, cut paper mosaic (2017)

"Enid" by Ann Stewart Anderson, 16x12in, cut paper mosaic (2017)

"Minnie" by Ann Stewart Anderson, 16x12in, cut paper mosaic (2017)

"Minnie" by Ann Stewart Anderson, 16x12in, cut paper mosaic (2017)

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

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Painting

Vignette: Susan Dworkin


“You must open yourself to communing with the desires of the paint and flow with it.” Susan Dworkin


"Tangled Up In Blue" by Susan Dworkin, 32x24in, vinegar paint (2015)

"Tangled Up In Blue" by Susan Dworkin, 32x24in, vinegar paint (2015)

Susan Dworkin has been experimenting with colonial painting techniques for fourteen years. Her current endeavor is adapting vinegar painting from its traditional use on flat wooden surfaces to other mediums. Historically used as a means of making common and inexpensive woods appear to be more valuable materials, such as metal, Dworkin experiments with the technique to create unique abstract compositions.

To date, she remains one of the pioneers in this venture, continually exploring and adapting the technique via artist board, foam core, metal, paper, glass, and mirror. “The nature of vinegar paint produces a multilayered spectrum of color that combines elements of impressionism, surrealism and lyrical abstractionism, explains Dworkin. “To work with this medium you must open yourself to communing with the desires of the paint and flow with it.” Her paintings are suggestive of rich landscapes and fantasy realms that allow the viewer to formulate their own personal vision. In one of her previous lives, Dworkin was a private estate gardener in Rhode Island and Massachusetts and finds color inspiration from those gardens and settings, as well as her many travels. She has lived in Lexington, Kentucky since 1989.

"Joy" by Susan Dworkin, 15x12in, vinegar paint (2017)

"Joy" by Susan Dworkin, 15x12in, vinegar paint (2017)

2017 has been a busy year for Dworkin, with solo exhibits at The Bar Complex, and the Hunt Morgan House, Bluegrass Trust for Historic Preservation, both in Lexington, Kentucky, and for the month of September she will have another solo show at the John G. Irvin Gallery, also in Lexington. In April 2018 she will be part of a group exhibit at ArtConnects in Lexington.

Dworkin has work in private collections in Lexington, KY, Chicago, IL, St. Petersburg, FL, and Tryon, NC.

Hometown: Lexington, Kentucky
Education: BA, Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI
Social Media: www.facebook.com/DesignsbyDworkin 

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

"Toska" by Susan Dworkin, 28x23in, vinegar paint (2017), $650|  BUY NOW

"Toska" by Susan Dworkin, 28x23in, vinegar paint (2017), $650| BUY NOW

"Play" by Susan Dworkin, 25x37in, vinegar paint (2017), $650 |  BUY NOW

"Play" by Susan Dworkin, 25x37in, vinegar paint (2017), $650 | BUY NOW

"The Call" by Susan Dworkin, 33x27in, vinegar paint (2017), $850 |  BUY NOW

"The Call" by Susan Dworkin, 33x27in, vinegar paint (2017), $850 | BUY NOW

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Painting

Vignette: Hillary Cox

"Friends" by Hillary Cox, 24x12in, gouache on canvas (2017)

"Friends" by Hillary Cox, 24x12in, gouache on canvas (2017)

There has always been a strain of emotionalism in Modern Art. With the ubiquity of psychoanalysis in the 20th Century, painting became, for many, a direct conduit for expressing the dark and complex currents of human feelings. The plasticity of paint mediums seem ideally suited for cathartic – only one step away from the profoundly elemental aspect of finger painting.

Hillary Cox is a self-educated painter who understands that quality in her much of her own work: “My art is somewhat representative of my thoughts and how I feel, touching on aspects of mental illness, mixed with the aspect of darkness and horror. I believe it is a very interesting thing to explore and indulge in the shadows of your mind, but is also good to learn how to appreciate the light.”

“Although I make a large amount of dark art, I also like to make fan art and cute things sometimes when I am feeling a little brighter. I work mostly in the realms of macabre and illustrative art, dipping into influences from nature to anime. My preferred materials are gouache on canvas, or watercolor pencil and ink on paper. I also enjoy working on digital platforms such as Manga Studio Pro.”

Cox is a 2016 St. James Court Art Fair Scholarship Recipient.

Hometown: Louisville, Kentucky
Age: 23
Website: http://www.hillarycoxart.storenvy.com
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lilharibo/

"Papillonsm" by Hillary Cox, 8x10in, gouache on canvas board (2017)

"Papillonsm" by Hillary Cox, 8x10in, gouache on canvas board (2017)

"Tête Dans Les Nuages" by Hillary Cox, 16x20in, gouache on watercolor (2017)

"Tête Dans Les Nuages" by Hillary Cox, 16x20in, gouache on watercolor (2017)

"Tailler" by Hillary Cox, 16x20in, gouache on canvas (2017)

"Tailler" by Hillary Cox, 16x20in, gouache on canvas (2017)

"Le Petite Souris" by Hillary Cox, 8x10in, gouache on canvas board (2017)

"Le Petite Souris" by Hillary Cox, 8x10in, gouache on canvas board (2017)

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

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Painting

Vignette: Sabra Crockett


“There seems to be a vacuous spiritual sense in our society.” — Sabra Crockett


Artist, Sabra Crockett

Artist, Sabra Crockett

Artists have painted nature and animals since the cave paintings at Lascaux, France. Those early renderings are documents of time: season by season, lifetime by lifetime, they are the first recorded history; but over the ages of time artists moved away from sociology and began capturing the complex beauty of other species as a means of expressing a reverence for nature. Art was also used to recognize the divine, and the natural world was often where they found it.

These paintings by Sabra Crockett are well-observed studies of specific birds, but they are placed in specific, idiosyncratic visual context for the purpose of conjuring a spiritual connection. The artist explains:

"Deception" by Sabra Crockett, 8x10in, acrylic and metal leaf on canvas (2017)

"Deception" by Sabra Crockett, 8x10in, acrylic and metal leaf on canvas (2017)

“My goal is to be a mechanism for shifting people's awareness towards nature. I believe that we have become disassociated with nature, therefore becoming disassociated with ourselves. There seems to be a vacuous spiritual sense in our society. Religion has become a sense of identity, rather than a transcendent self-discovery, and tuning into the higher self. Personally, connecting with nature has always been my way of connecting to the divine. Now I feel that our beautiful parks, wildlife, and habitats are being threatened even more. It feels like an assault these days. So I focus on imagery for people to create a connection with our natural world in hopes there will be a connection within themselves.”

"Exaltation" by Sabra Crockett, 12x12in, acrylic metal leaf venetian plaster on board (2017)

"Exaltation" by Sabra Crockett, 12x12in, acrylic metal leaf venetian plaster on board (2017)

In January 2017, Crockett was a recipient of a Great Meadows Foundation Professional Development Grant, and currently is a participant in Gridworks Revisited, Lexington, KY. She will open a solo show on March 31 at Downtown Pilates, Louisville, KY, and will be included in SALON International, in New York City April 12 -16. Summer will bring exhibits at Dragon King's Daughter in May, and at Evolving Gallery in June, both in Louisville.

Hometown: Rochester, New York
Age: 43
Education: BFA, Rochester Institute of Technology
Website: http://www.sabralynne.com

"Judgement" by Sabra Crockett, 10x8in, acrylic and copper leaf on canvas (2016)

"Judgement" by Sabra Crockett, 10x8in, acrylic and copper leaf on canvas (2016)

"Pride" by Sabra Crockett, 8x10in, acrylic and plaster on canvas (2016)

"Pride" by Sabra Crockett, 8x10in, acrylic and plaster on canvas (2016)

"Balance" by Sabra Crockett, 8x10in, acrylic and metal leaf on canvas (2017)

"Balance" by Sabra Crockett, 8x10in, acrylic and metal leaf on canvas (2017)

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved. 

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Drawing, Painting

Vignette: Joshua Jenkins

"Three Kings No. 2" by Joshua Jenkins, 52 x 41 x 1 in, acrylic and mixed media on canvas (2016)

"Three Kings No. 2" by Joshua Jenkins, 52 x 41 x 1 in, acrylic and mixed media on canvas (2016)

Jenkins at his home studio (2017)

Jenkins at his home studio (2017)

For his upcoming show at Kore Gallery in Louisville, painter Joshua Jenkins has been creating a body of work that shows him shifting from the energetic, bold color and mark making that has long characterized his work. A softer approach to outlining form and a comparatively muted color palette rendered in broad washes of acrylic paint has dominated his technique since the end of summer 2016.

“Seeing a muted color pallet can seem calming to the viewer,” explains Jenkins, “but once you look closer at the surface, you can see a juxtaposition of more complex emotions with anxious line work subtly radiating through each canvas. The subject matter of each work focuses on the abstraction of the sorrowful human form in contrast with a slight homage to nature…”

"Drawing #18" by Joshua Jenkins, 9.5 × 7.5 in, graphite and watercolor on paper (2016)

"Drawing #18" by Joshua Jenkins, 9.5 × 7.5 in, graphite and watercolor on paper (2016)

It is in that balance that Jenkins finds contentment, a location that inspired the title of the new exhibit: Somewhere In Between Anxiety and Serenity. “Joys and upsets always seem to come hand in hand. Keeping in mind the current political climate of our country and the world as a whole, along with my own personal life experiences, I wanted to explore the contrasting feelings of fear and happiness. It seems as though neither emotion can shine without the other lingering in the background.”

The artist is featured in the January 2017 issue of Kentucky Homes & Gardens (Louisville). The article is about Carriage House Interiors and their 2016 Homearama design that prominently featured two of Jenkins’ paintings.

The Great Meadows Foundation recently awarded an Artist Professional Development Grant to Jenkins. He will be using the grant money to visit Los Angeles for the first time.

Jenkins has also been accepted to showcase his work at Mellwood Art Center's March Art Show on March 4th & 5th. 

Hometown: Poughkeepsie, NY
Age: 29
Education: BA in Digital Media with a Minor in Studio Art, Marist College (Poughkeepsie, New York)
Website: http://www.joshuajenkinsart.com
Gallery Representative: Joshua is self-represented locally, but is represented by New Editions Gallery in the Lexington area

"Birds Flying High" by Joshua Jenkins, 40 x 40 x 1.5in, acrylic and mixed media on canvas (2016)

"Birds Flying High" by Joshua Jenkins, 40 x 40 x 1.5in, acrylic and mixed media on canvas (2016)

"A Moment of Disbelief" by Joshua Jenkins, 40 x 36 x 1in, acrylic and mixed media on canvas (2016)

"A Moment of Disbelief" by Joshua Jenkins, 40 x 36 x 1in, acrylic and mixed media on canvas (2016)

A detail of an untitled work by Jenkins.

A detail of an untitled work by Jenkins.

"Wondering What Just Happened" by Joshua Jenkins, 24 x 18 x 1.5in, acrylic and mixed media on canvas (2016) $750

"Wondering What Just Happened" by Joshua Jenkins, 24 x 18 x 1.5in, acrylic and mixed media on canvas (2016) $750

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2016 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

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