Fiber

Fiber

Vignette: Kathleen Loomis

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 “Daily People” by Kathleen Loomis, Fabric, Individual figures 3 to 10in tall, 2017, $20 each on wood base

“Daily People” by Kathleen Loomis, Fabric, Individual figures 3 to 10in tall, 2017, $20 each on wood base

Artists can and often do have many sides to their creative expression; writers paint, singers sculpt and sometimes it seems as if everybody takes pictures (doesn’t make them a photographer).

We have visited Kathleen Loomis previously as a maker of flag images that make political and social statements, but today she shares her version of a not uncommon artist’s practice: daily assignments. Of course, most any committed artist enters their studio every day, but in addition to whatever ongoing projects that might be taking up their time, the might set themselves the task of completing one self-contained idea each day, possibly in the morning. Like morning yoga or calisthenics, it gets the blood moving for the remainder of the day. 

“I've been doing daily art since 2001,” Loomis tells us. “Each year the rules change; in different years I have worked with photography, collage, drawing, hand stitching, quilting, soft sculpture and mail art.  

 “Mask” by Kathleen Loomis, Paper, 10x10in, 2014, NFS

“Mask” by Kathleen Loomis, Paper, 10x10in, 2014, NFS

Loomis is a very active blogger, so the evidence of this strain of work is often evidenced there. In 2010 she took a photo every day and posted it: kathysdailyart.blogspot.com. In 2014 Loomis made a collage every day, but also challenged herself to expand on those ideas once a week for a bigger collage piece. A gradual increase in scale also followed her 2016 daily practice: “I did a drawing every day, filling five sketchbooks. Each new sketchbook was a bit larger than the previous ones as I gained confidence.”

“Once you've done it this long, the concept takes on a life of its own. Ask me why I do daily art, I'll tell you that I like the discipline and structure, that it makes me think about art every day, that the regular work improves my skill and focus, that the repetition allows me to explore ideas without the risk of a ‘real’ work. But I also do daily art because I do daily art. It has become a part of my life and I would feel bereft, missing an essential part of me, without it.” 

Loomis’s solo exhibit, Day by Day by Day: adventures in regular art, will be at PYRO Gallery in Louisville October 25 through December 1, 2018. The artist will give a gallery talk November 3 at 12 noon.

 ‘Sad Guy (detail)” by Kathleen Loomis, Hand stitching on cotton, 4x4in (one 4x4 panel in assembly of 366 daily stitchings), 2012, NFS

‘Sad Guy (detail)” by Kathleen Loomis, Hand stitching on cotton, 4x4in (one 4x4 panel in assembly of 366 daily stitchings), 2012, NFS

Selected Exhibitions

  • Pyro Gallery, Louisville KY, Day by Day by Day, 2018; New Year, New Pyro Artists, 2017
        

  • Indianapolis Museum of Art, Indianapolis IN, Dialogues, 2016
         

  • Dairy Barn, Athens OH, and on tour throughout the US, Quilt National ’15, ’11,’09 and ’03 (Quilts Japan Prize, 2009)
         

  • Jasper Arts Center, Jasper IN, Annual Juried Art Exhibits, 2001, 2004, 2006, 2011, 2015, 2017 (award of merit, 2011; best in show, 2015 and 2017)

Hometown: Saginaw, Michigan
Education: BA in Journalism, Syracuse University; MSJ Northwestern University
Website: http://kathleenloomis.com

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 “Pinup Girl” by Kathleen Loomis, Paper collage on library catalog card, 3x5in, 2014

“Pinup Girl” by Kathleen Loomis, Paper collage on library catalog card, 3x5in, 2014

 “Expanding Universe” by Kathleen Loomis, Ink on paper, 6x6in, 2016, NFS

“Expanding Universe” by Kathleen Loomis, Ink on paper, 6x6in, 2016, NFS

 “In the Alley” by Kathleen Loomis, Digital photo, 2010, $25 printed at 4x6" and matted

“In the Alley” by Kathleen Loomis, Digital photo, 2010, $25 printed at 4x6" and matted


Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2018 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved. In addition to his work at the LVA, Keith is also the Managing Editor of a website, Arts-Louisville.com, which covers local visual arts, theatre, and music in Louisville.

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Fiber

Open Studio Spotlight: Katie Castillo

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There has been a lot of energy spent redefining “craft” for the 21st century, but in simple terms we might accept it is as the presence of art in everyday, functional objects. Furniture, vessels, and other household items that capture the spirit and quality of things made by hand when there was no other option. You made it because there was no mass-produced option available from a store down the road.

In the work of Katie Castillo, we find that individual handcrafted quality beneath our feet: “I have worked as a Speech Therapist for more than 14 years. I have no formal artistic training, but I have always loved playing with color. I was inspired into rug making by Emily Carr (1871-1945), while I was living in B.C., Canada. I chose rag rugs specifically because they originated in Appalachia, and I was missing my Kentucky roots.”  

“The process I use, called twining, is ancient and calming. I create my rugs on wooden looms which I built myself. My materials are old bed sheets and other fabric, which I tear into pieces and then re-assemble; no sewing required. I love to take a piece out into the community and work on it in public. When I am not in my Art Sanctuary studio, you’ll find me in Shelby Park or sitting down by the river with my friend Mr. Lincoln.” 

 “Evil Eye” by Katie Castillo, 44x24in

“Evil Eye” by Katie Castillo, 44x24in

I have fun creating different color combinations and playing with themes, such as ‘Lobster in the Woods’, which is based on my time in the Northwest. ‘Evil Eye’ was inspired by my travels in Turkey. My rugs are available for purchase through 5-0-Lou and Craft(s) Gallery and Mercantile in Louisville, KY.“

All of Castillo’s rugs are 44x24in and typically weigh in at more than 5 pounds.

Katie Castillo is participating in the 2018 Open Studio Weekend, sponsored by Louisville Visual Art and University of Louisville’s Hite Art Institute. His studio, located in the Germantown neighborhood, will be open the weekend of November 3 and 4. Tickets for Open Studio Weekend will go on sale October 16. Click here for more information. 

Hometown: Covington, Kentucky
Education: BS, Biology, University of Louisville, 2002; MS, Communication Disorders, University of Louisville, 2004. 
Website: https://sagerugs.com

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Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2018 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved. In addition to his work at the LVA, Keith is also the Managing Editor of a website, Arts-Louisville.com, which covers local visual arts, theatre, and music in Louisville.

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Are you interested in being on Artebella? Click here to learn more.

Drawing, Fiber

Open Studio Spotlight: Samantha Ludwig

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Samantha Ludwig is an artist who works comfortably in several mediums. In the work highlighted here, she draws houses in exquisitely rendered detail. They are executed in graphite, using a pencil. The richness of the mark making and modeled textures connect us to the sublime satisfaction of the most fundamental artist’s action: the simple act of drawing - observation through the eye and to the hand.

But Ludwig’s technique is far from simple, and the attention to detail is not just academic. She invests each structure with real feeling for the space they occupy, the life that has been lived with these walls. She forces such introspection by isolating the building and the yard from the environment. Stripped of that larger social context, it is surprising how much is still communicated through the immediate relationship of space and architectural form.

Ludwig also works with textiles, with a particular emphasis on flags that are variations on the United States of America “stars and stripes.”

 “717 E. Ormsby” by Samantha Ludwig, Graphite on Paper, 9x14in, 201 $150

“717 E. Ormsby” by Samantha Ludwig, Graphite on Paper, 9x14in, 201 $150

Writing on her blog, Ludwig explains: “Most people are confused and are unsure of what I mean when I say, ‘I'm making flags,’ which is understandable. It's a long process that initials a lot of math and attention. From making color samples so that you can replicate colors, to making the dye into a paste, and then taping, masking, and embroidering the material that is to be the final piece, and even all that doesn't cover it.”

More recently, Ludwig has returned to wood block prints, making prints of a size that allows a very hands-on approach to process – her press is her feet: “…me alone in the studio dancing, sliding and shuffling on them on top of the plywood.”

“It’s been wonderful to revisit it (wood cutting), because there’s something incredibly enticing about carving. I remember when I was in elementary school I dreamed of becoming a master wood whittler.

Samanth Ludwig will be participating in the 2018 Open Studio Weekend, sponsored by Louisville Visual Art and University of Louisville’s Hite Art Institute. Her studio, located in the Germantown neighborhood, will be open the weekend of November 3 and 4. Tickets for OpenStudio Weekend will go on sale October 16. Click here for more information.

Recent Exhibitions:
Quills, Introducing: Samantha Ludwig, Louisville, Kentucky.
Great Flood, 4735 Peachtree, Louisville, Kentucky.
St. James Juried Art Festival, The Work of Samantha Ludwig, Louisville, Kentucky. 

Hometown: Louisville, Kentucky
Education: BFA, Painting and Fiber, Kansas City Art Institute, BHA, Concentration Western Art History
Website: samanthludwig.com

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“In Vogue We Trust” by Samantha Ludwig, Dyed cotton, 3x6ft, 2011, Private collection  

 “Voyuer” by Samanth Ludwig, Ink on Paper, 23x25in, $475

“Voyuer” by Samanth Ludwig, Ink on Paper, 23x25in, $475

 “Great Garrison Flag” by Samantha Ludwig, Hand Dyed Embroidered Cotton, 6x13in, 2017, Part of the Permeant Collection of Omni Hotel, Louisville, Ky

“Great Garrison Flag” by Samantha Ludwig, Hand Dyed Embroidered Cotton, 6x13in, 2017, Part of the Permeant Collection of Omni Hotel, Louisville, Ky


Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2018 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved. In addition to his work at the LVA, Keith is also the Managing Editor of a website, Arts-Louisville.com, which covers local visual arts, theatre, and music in Louisville.

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Are you interested in being on Artebella? Click here to learn more.

Fiber

Vignette: Jesi Evans Murphy

 “Honeycomb Bee” by Jesi Evans, Mixed media embroidery, 8x8in, 2018, $500

“Honeycomb Bee” by Jesi Evans, Mixed media embroidery, 8x8in, 2018, $500


Jesi Evans Murphy is a fiber artist who uses, “… what is traditionally viewed as craft media to create conceptual fine art.” Her work is a compelling match up of contemporary artistic sensibility with craft tradition. 

“A very important part of my process is hand making each piece. I come from a background where I often participated in craft projects with my mother, grandmother and great grandmother. Creating art within the medium of craft allows me to fulfill my desire for creative expression while also bringing up my most cherished childhood memories. My art is an extension of my personal experience as well as concepts and opinions about the world outside my immediate scope. My fear, anxiety, joy, and hope are channeled into each piece.”

 “Green Bee Revisited” by Jesi Evans, Mixed media embroidery, 8x8in, 2018, $500

“Green Bee Revisited” by Jesi Evans, Mixed media embroidery, 8x8in, 2018, $500

“My conceptual work draws heavily from issues I find relevant to my life as well as the emotions I experience while dealing with those issues. Current projects include a body of work based on environmental concerns and a body of work based on chronic illness. Both bodies of work call forth my anxiety as well as my hope. The craft medium is warm, inviting, and accessible to the viewer. This accessibility draws the viewer in and invites them to experience the emotions the conceptual work brings forth.”

When Murphy speaks of working on creative projects with previous generations of women in her family, she touches upon the fact that American textile art has lived mostly as a matriarchal, generational, connection surreptitiously building a feminist thread into the culture.  

Murphy will be showing her body of work APIS this December at Delinquent Gallery in Bloomington, Indiana.

Recent exhibits: 

2018

Be Kind, Rewind a Cult Film Group Show, Delinquent Gallery, Bloomington, IN
1-Up: Extra Life a Video Game Group Show, Delinquent Gallery, Bloomington, IN
KaiJuly a Kaiju/Giant Monster Group Show, Delinquent Gallery, Bloomington, IN
2015

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Open Studio Weekend – Hot Garbage Collective, LVA Building, Louisville, KY
Open Studio Weekend Exhibition, Cressman Center, Louisville, KY
Fantastic Fibers 2015, Yeiser Art Center, Paducah, KY
Art[Squared], PUBLIC, Louisville, KY 

Hometown: Bardstown, Kentucky
Education: Certificate, Front End Web Design, CodeLouisville, Louisville, KY, 2015;     
BA, Studio Art (Fiber Emphasis), Berea College, Berea, KY, 2007
Website: https://cargocollective.com/jesievansart
Instagram: @jesievans
Tumbler: jesievans

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 “Heart with Three Bees” by Jesi Evans, Mixed media embroidery, 8x8in, 2016, $500

“Heart with Three Bees” by Jesi Evans, Mixed media embroidery, 8x8in, 2016, $500

 “Missing Bee” by Jesi Evans, Mixed media embroidery, 8x8in, 2018, $1000

“Missing Bee” by Jesi Evans, Mixed media embroidery, 8x8in, 2018, $1000

 “Skull with Nine Bees” by Jesi Evans, Mixed media embroidery, 8x8in, 2015, $500

“Skull with Nine Bees” by Jesi Evans, Mixed media embroidery, 8x8in, 2015, $500


Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2018 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved. In addition to his work at the LVA, Keith is also the Managing Editor of a website, Arts-Louisville.com, which covers local visual arts, theatre, and music in Louisville.

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Fiber

Vignette: Stephanie Tanner

 "Up The River" by Stephanie Tanner, Mixed Media Fiber Art Metal, Wool, Driftwood, 12x60in, 2018, $600

"Up The River" by Stephanie Tanner, Mixed Media Fiber Art Metal, Wool, Driftwood, 12x60in, 2018, $600

Stephanie Tanner makes sculptures that scream out to be touched. The tactile quality of the wool she often uses is particularly alluring, but more importantly, the pieces communicate an emotional intensity that is utterly compelling.

 "Holding Fast" by Stephanie Tanner, Concrete, Wool, Wood, 8x22x18in, 2018, $250

"Holding Fast" by Stephanie Tanner, Concrete, Wool, Wood, 8x22x18in, 2018, $250

“I like to think of myself as a woven word artist,” explains Tanner, “a poet that wants to hold words in my hands and show how they appeared as I wrote them. I write passionately about love, loss, longing, and mental illness. My rendering of each poem uses discarded household objects, concrete sculpture and various types of fiber (wool, yarn, fabric etc.) to move the poem from paper into this dimension.”

The recognizable objects are filled with fabric situated in forms and patterns suggestive of the ordinary contents or attachments, but the softness of the materials, including the delicate interplay of pastel colors that suggest Baroque paintings, lends a dream-like quality to the sculptures. Tanner’s formal education may have not included an art degree, but her work is nonetheless filled with academic references from history, even while it expresses complex emotional states that reflect.

“I am stubbornly self-taught in that I learned my techniques through a great deal of curiosity and experimentation. There is never a sketch or a plan…just the thought ‘I wonder what would happen if I did… X?’ and then surrender myself fully until it tells me it is finished. My goal is to bridge the gap between poetry and visual art and create a fuller sensory experience.”

“I loved the people I worked for but found the 9-5 life unfulfilling. I quit in 2008 after the birth of my daughter and jumped head first into art, pursuing a career as a professional photographer. After 9 years of photographing weddings, babies, and families my heart once again felt restless and I felt a desire to further push my creative limits. I began exploring all kinds of artistic mediums but none of them felt right for me. I had always written poetry but in 2016 I began weaving as a way to battle my chronic depression and anxiety and it quickly moved from a hobby to a full-time passion. Recently I have been working on larger pieces that incorporate my poetry, weaving, and found objects.”

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On September 29, Tanner will be part of the Louisville Visual Art’s Juried Exhibit in the 2018 Portland Art & Heritage Fair. The exhibit will be available for viewing at the Marine Hospital from 11am-5pm. Jury prizes will be awarded at 2:00pm.

Hometown: Grew up in Germany, Alabama, South Carolina, Rhode Island and Pennsylvania. But for the last 15 years, I have called Louisville my home.
Education: Degree in Hospitality Management, MBA, Johnson and Wales University
Website: www.iamstephtanner.com
Instagram: iamstephtanner

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 "Starships" by Stephanie Tanner, Wool, antique fish basket, 24x18in, 2018, $300

"Starships" by Stephanie Tanner, Wool, antique fish basket, 24x18in, 2018, $300

 “Nowhere to Keep This” by Stephanie Tanner, Wool, vintage suitcase, 26x20in, 2018, $425

“Nowhere to Keep This” by Stephanie Tanner, Wool, vintage suitcase, 26x20in, 2018, $425


Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2018 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved. In addition to his work at the LVA, Keith is also the Managing Editor of a website, Arts-Louisville.com, which covers local visual arts, theatre, and music in Louisville.

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