Community, Artist Support, Mural

Google Fiber murals

Louisville Visual Art has forged a new and dynamic partnership with Google Fiber. Together, we commissioned artists for three murals celebrating Louisville's diverse neighborhoods and unique culture.

After receiving submissions from more than 70 local and regional artists, LVA and Google Fiber collaborated to select three very talented locals, all working in very distinct styles, to bring more color to different Louisville neighborhoods. Finalists were invited to submit a site-specific proposal for one mural each. The mural designs reflect each artist's vision of Louisville's diversity, independence, and optimism. The three artists are Carrie Donovan, Liz Richter and Carlos Gamez de Francisco.

Carrie Donovan worked in Portland at The Table restaurant in the Church of the Promise building (1800 Portland Avenue, owned by Kathie & Larry Stoess). “'Portland flows with promise'” is a phrase that represents all that happens in the Promise building," Donovan said. "The shapes connect the different aspects of their work, and the banner and the type express the idea of 'flow' — like the river, and like the way their work flows into the community."

2017-10-31 14.19.31.jpg
  Carlos Gamez de Francisco  brightened up a wall on the side of the Nitty Gritty vintage clothing store (996 Barret Ave., owned by Terri Burt) in the Highlands. He sought "to give visibility to one of the most important features of the people of Louisville: acceptance, respect, and tolerance to others," he said. Burt is thrilled by his work and said, "Everyone loves it. I actually have people coming into my business to tell me how cool the mural is on the building. My business neighbors love having it represent the 'hood." Gamez de Francisco 's folkloric style is synergistic with the colorful and eclectic feel of this neighborhood, and his images reference different immigrant cultures represented in Louisville. Burt added, "The building is much more noticeable. It has become a conversation in the Louisville art scene."

Carlos Gamez de Francisco brightened up a wall on the side of the Nitty Gritty vintage clothing store (996 Barret Ave., owned by Terri Burt) in the Highlands. He sought "to give visibility to one of the most important features of the people of Louisville: acceptance, respect, and tolerance to others," he said. Burt is thrilled by his work and said, "Everyone loves it. I actually have people coming into my business to tell me how cool the mural is on the building. My business neighbors love having it represent the 'hood." Gamez de Francisco 's folkloric style is synergistic with the colorful and eclectic feel of this neighborhood, and his images reference different immigrant cultures represented in Louisville. Burt added, "The building is much more noticeable. It has become a conversation in the Louisville art scene."

2017-10-17 15.30.34.jpg
  Liz Richter  added to the growing mural movement in NuLu on the side of Red Tree Furniture (701 E. Market St., owned by Garwood Linton). "I believe my design will help elevate the local culture as it relates to the mural scene by providing an example of a different kind of street art then what is seen around town, and from a distinctly feminine perspective. I want to make this mural bold, exuberant and engaging," Richter said. Her Kentucky Wildflower is "signifying the growth of local businesses and freethinking individuals. Overlapping, interdependent blades and flowers illustrate a community of connectivity."

Liz Richter added to the growing mural movement in NuLu on the side of Red Tree Furniture (701 E. Market St., owned by Garwood Linton). "I believe my design will help elevate the local culture as it relates to the mural scene by providing an example of a different kind of street art then what is seen around town, and from a distinctly feminine perspective. I want to make this mural bold, exuberant and engaging," Richter said. Her Kentucky Wildflower is "signifying the growth of local businesses and freethinking individuals. Overlapping, interdependent blades and flowers illustrate a community of connectivity."

2017-10-18 15.59.53.jpg
 Support from corporate partners, like Google Fiber, for public art projects celebrating distinct local perspectives has a significant impact on both neighborhoods and the business community.  Louisville Visual Art Executive Director Lindy Casebier said, “Public art makes a big difference in every community. We are thrilled that Louisville is one of five cities chosen across the U.S.”

Support from corporate partners, like Google Fiber, for public art projects celebrating distinct local perspectives has a significant impact on both neighborhoods and the business community.

Louisville Visual Art Executive Director Lindy Casebier said, “Public art makes a big difference in every community. We are thrilled that Louisville is one of five cities chosen across the U.S.”