Painting, Mixed Media

Q&A: Artist David Iacovazzi-Pau


"People need to be educated about the value of art." — David Iacovazzi-Pau


  David Iacovazzi-Pau: Photo by Michael Brohm

David Iacovazzi-Pau: Photo by Michael Brohm

David Iacovazzi-Pau’s work focuses on the human figure and is a visual diary of the people he encounters. His series reveal different aspects of the sitters and the link between their physical appearance and personality. “My aim is to portray idiosyncrasies and evoke the mood of the subject in order for the portrait to have an accurate likeness and affect. The work reflects what I sense about a person and is a documentation of my community.” 

Born 1978 in Luxembourg, Iacovazzi-Pau began his education in fine arts from the age of 15 in Belgium. He later attended the Centre Académique des Arts in Luxembourg and immigrated to the United States in 1997, studying at Indiana University Southeast. He currently lives and works in Louisville, Kentucky.

When did you first think you would be an artist?

I don’t recall a specific time or moment. Over the years I gradually felt I was one. It was obvious early on that I was not going to be a mathematician …

If you could do anything else but make art, what would it be?

Probably something related to art history. Then again running a vineyard could be fun too.

  "Little Miss Flint" ("Conversation with Teddy Abrams" Series) by David Iacovazzi-Pau, 12x8.5in, Ink drawing and inkjet on paper (2016)—5999 ink lines representing the amount of children that were affected by lead in Flint's tap water.

"Little Miss Flint" ("Conversation with Teddy Abrams" Series) by David Iacovazzi-Pau, 12x8.5in, Ink drawing and inkjet on paper (2016)—5999 ink lines representing the amount of children that were affected by lead in Flint's tap water.

What frightens you the most?

Crowd manipulation, albeit interesting, is frightening. I also have a phobia of reptiles, especially snakes. 

What is your favorite music to listen to when making art?

That varies, a lot of jazz and classical. Sometimes I turn on the French news for a while. And sometimes silence seems to be my preference.

Favorite movie?

A Pure Formality by Giuseppe Tornatore, starring Roman Polanski and Gérard Depardieu.

What are you reading right now?

“Portraits by Ingres: Image of an Epoch", and the Philip Guston Retrospective (2003) catalogue.

  "Self Portrait with Maya (in the studio)" by David Iacovazzi-Pau, 30x24in, oil on paper (2016)

"Self Portrait with Maya (in the studio)" by David Iacovazzi-Pau, 30x24in, oil on paper (2016)

If you were given a $100,000 what would do with it?

I'll let you know when I get the $100,000.

What advice would you give a young artist just out of college?

I would encourage them to see as much artwork as they can whether it's in museums, galleries, or studios. Contemporary art as well as historical are fabulous sources of inspiration. Also, don't worry about fitting in, paint for yourself and make artwork that excites you. 

What does art mean to you?

Art means different things to me. I was lucky to be encouraged to draw and paint from a young age, so it has become a way of life. As an artist I’m working within my own means and in the process there's self-doubt, frustrations and disappointment but in spite of it all, I enjoy working things out in a painting. It gives me a sense of freedom and purpose when I'm engaged with it.

  "Teddy #2" ("Conversation with Teddy Abrams" Series) by David Iacovazzi-Pau, 24x18in, graphite on paper (2016)

"Teddy #2" ("Conversation with Teddy Abrams" Series) by David Iacovazzi-Pau, 24x18in, graphite on paper (2016)

If you could have a talent that you currently don't already have what would it be and why?

Having the skills to be an eloquent orator would be my first choice. It makes things a lot easier if you are able to articulate your thoughts well. 

How do you feel about the local art scene in Louisville? Would you change anything about it?

The amount of local artists is increasing and they are good. The problem is that there are just not enough buyers to sustain it. Galleries will close and artists will continue to struggle (nothing new here) but also move away as long as we don't see any changes. People need to be educated about the value of art. They will then in turn invest in the local visual art scene. 

  A photo from David's studio (2016)

A photo from David's studio (2016)

Has your style changed or evolved over the years? If so what do you think influenced this?

Yes, it did. Probably because of being exposed to different styles and new artists. Also, making mistakes can take you to uncharted territories; you can learn and grow from it. I like to think that I did. But I think progress and change mainly comes from working. Chuck Close has a great quote, "Inspiration is for amateurs, the rest of us just show up and get to work."

What do you feel is your greatest flaw? 

I tend to obsess over things and I can be stubborn, that's the Breton in me.

Name: David Iacovazzi-Pau
Hometown: Grand Duchy of Luxembourg
Age: 37
Education: Centre Académique des Arts in Luxembourg and Indiana University Southeast
Website: http://www.davidiacovazzipau.com/
Gallery Representative: Swanson Contemporary Gallery

  "Teddy #3" ("Conversation with Teddy Abrams" Series) by David Iacovazzi-Pau, 24x18in, oil on paper (2016)

"Teddy #3" ("Conversation with Teddy Abrams" Series) by David Iacovazzi-Pau, 24x18in, oil on paper (2016)

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Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2016 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

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