Painting

Vignette: Richard Shu

 

"Like all great travelers, I have seen more than I can remember and I remember more than I can see" Let me help you "see" what you may not remember and "remember" what you may not see!” - Benjamin Disraeli

"Low Tide in Saint Michel" by Richard Shu, watercolor, 12x14in, 2017, $780

"Low Tide in Saint Michel" by Richard Shu, watercolor, 12x14in, 2017, $780

67 year-old Taiwan-born artist Richard Shu calls himself an “urban sketcher.” After a long and noted career as an architect, he documents his extensive travels in watercolor sketches executed with a sure eye for the fundamental design elements of a scene. As a medium, watercolor welcomes certainty in the choice of color and the placement of marks, and Shu’s careful study of his subjects is evident in the work, an almost naïve application that expresses a sophisticated sensibility.

Shu views his paintings as an ongoing document of his life experience “My art is part of my journey through watercolor, I travel, sketch and paint the image and space that I see.” The images have an immediacy about them that reinforces the idea of a sketchbook, or perhaps even closer to a diary, capturing impressions of a time and place with a brush instead of words.

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“I started my journey when I was 12 years old, when my parents sent me to Guayaquil, Ecuador from Taipei, Taiwan. It was in Ecuador that I started to study architecture, but finished my undergraduate study in Madrid, then was accepted to the University of Pennsylvania for my graduate studies. After graduating, I found work in Chicago with the international firm of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill. I moved to Louisville in 1982, worked for a local architectural firm for 2 years, then started my own Design Build firm and practice till 1999.  In 2000 I transitioned into a total different career in the investment field. I am retired now and back on exploring the creative passion that I missed for so long.”

Name: Richard Shu
Age: 67
Hometown: Louisville, Kentucky
Education: MA, Architecture, University of Pennsylvania.
Website: richardshuarts.com
Instagram: mistashu

"The Harbor" by Richard Shu, watercolor, 12x14in, 2017, $800

"The Harbor" by Richard Shu, watercolor, 12x14in, 2017, $800

"Low Country" by Richard Shu, watercolor, 12x14in, 2017, $780

"Low Country" by Richard Shu, watercolor, 12x14in, 2017, $780

"El Capitan" by Richard Shu, watercolor, 14x14in, 2017, $850

"El Capitan" by Richard Shu, watercolor, 14x14in, 2017, $850

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

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Ceramics

Vignette: Alex Adams

“I am an artist who values the power of community.” – Alex Adams

Alex Adams. Courtesy of the artist.

Alex Adams. Courtesy of the artist.

Clay is among the most malleable of three-dimensional mediums. It is both strong and supple. A form can be drawn from a lump on the wheel into a sturdy yet graceful form of high functionality, but onto that impressionable surface, textures and decorative motifs can be so easily imposed. Alex Adams has been using a stamp technique that leaves behind sharp corners that violate the visual integrity of the surface in a manner that hints that the structural integrity might also be compromised, but nothing could further from the truth.

“I am a ceramic artist. I make pottery that is crafted with great scrutiny. Articulated forms are designed with a function in mind; wooden potter’s tools and artist-designed stamps bring each piece to life. Subtle glazes break over stamp impressions to expose the creative energy that is stored in each handmade object. I am an artist who values the power of community, our ability to learn from each other, positive encouragement, and support. These are the things that have made my career possible and I reciprocate these values at AA Clay Studio & Gallery.”

"Vase" by Alex Adams, Ceramic, 10x6x6in, 2017, $70

"Vase" by Alex Adams, Ceramic, 10x6x6in, 2017, $70

Adam’s work is functional, but there is room for wit. In a pair of vessels he titled, “Cupple,” the two bowls are very much alike, except that one shows a protrusion that would appear to fit perfectly into an indentation in the companion piece. There is a play on both words and on form that suggests a commentary on gender fluidity. Or perhaps a ceramic bowl is just a ceramic bowl.

In spring 2017 Adams was a recipient of an Artist Professional Development Grant from the Great Meadows Foundation. Through October 10, Adams will have an item on display for the Louisville Clay Jury show at Mantle Gallery, located at the Mudworks location on Barret Ave. His work can also be found at AA Clay Studio & Gallery, of which he is owner/proprietor and where Louisville Clay artists are featured in an exhibit during the months of September and October.

 


AA Clay Studio & Gallery will offer a 2-day Raku workshop in October for Intermediate to Advanced students.

Make: Saturday 10/14 (1:00-3:00 PM)
Fire: Saturday 10/21 (5:00-8:00 PM)

Registration can be made through the studio’s website: aaclay.com

"Cupple" by Alex Adams, Ceramic, 3x3.5x3.5in, 2015, $50 for set

"Cupple" by Alex Adams, Ceramic, 3x3.5x3.5in, 2015, $50 for set

Hometown: Louisville, KentuckyEducation: BA, ceramics, Berea College, 2008
Website: aaclay.com
Instagram: aaclaystudio

"Vase" by Alex Adams, Ceramic, 5.5x4.4x4.5in, 2017, $55

"Vase" by Alex Adams, Ceramic, 5.5x4.4x4.5in, 2017, $55

"Batter Bowl" by Alex Adams, Ceramic, 5.5x 8.5x6in, 2017, $45 each

"Batter Bowl" by Alex Adams, Ceramic, 5.5x 8.5x6in, 2017, $45 each

"Canister Set" by Alex Adams, Ceramic, 6x6x6in - 4x4x4in, 2016, $120 for set of three

"Canister Set" by Alex Adams, Ceramic, 6x6x6in - 4x4x4in, 2016, $120 for set of three

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

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Mixed Media

Vignette: Wendy Smith

Fetish \ˈfe-tish\ :an inanimate object worshiped for its supposed magical powers or because it is considered to be inhabited by a spirit.

"Multicolor Stick Fetish Box" by Wendi Smith, Acrylic on reclaimed pine box, sticks, floss, beads, 9.25 x 14 x 1.25in, 2017

"Multicolor Stick Fetish Box" by Wendi Smith, Acrylic on reclaimed pine box, sticks, floss, beads, 9.25 x 14 x 1.25in, 2017

When we speak of installations, we conjure up memories of three-dimensional work that would fill up a wall or even a room – at times whole environments are created. So when an installation artist such as Wendi Smith builds small boxes, we should not be surprised that each one might come across to the viewer as a miniature installation.

"Bone Fetish Box" by Wendi Smith, Acrylic on reclaimed cedar box, jawbone, feather, bead, cord, 5.75x3.75x1.5in, 2016

"Bone Fetish Box" by Wendi Smith, Acrylic on reclaimed cedar box, jawbone, feather, bead, cord, 5.75x3.75x1.5in, 2016

The wooden objects are adorned with images representing small organic items that are matched by the actual items themselves, revealed when we open the snug and perfectly fitted drawers. Seashells, seedpods feathers, and small twigs are placed inside, intimately positioned with beads and thread; handmade bits that echo the forms found in nature.

"Bone Fetish Box" by Wendi Smith (detail)

"Bone Fetish Box" by Wendi Smith (detail)

“A long fascination with ritual objects has brought me to fetishes,” states Smith. “A fetish may be a figure or a non-figurative object that is associated with a spiritual connection, magic, or offerings. Creating a fetish is a way of making a prayer or intention physical, of calling upon an unseen power, of trying to influence that which we cannot control.”  

“These particular pieces are culled from found natural objects, and influenced by Native American design. They are not intended to be powerful or magical, except in the reverence for Nature in which they are designed and executed.”

If Smith doesn’t seek to overwhelm with these fetish boxes, there is still undeniable attraction in their mystery and discovery. The viewer is inextricably drawn to the sensuous warmth of the well-crafted wood and to the preciousness of the objects contained within. They might be seen to replace the aged cigar boxes and old canning jars that those of us of a certain generation can recall using to safeguard found treasures in our childhood. And what can be more powerful than memory?

This past June, Smith was a part of Curio Cabinet, a curated group exhibit at the Indianapolis Art Center. In February 2018 she will have a solo show at garner narrative contemporary gallery in Louisville.

Hometown: Corydon, Indiana
Education: BS Art Education, Illinois State University 1972:
MS Painting, Illinois State University, 1975
Gallery Representation: PYRO Gallery (Louisville)

"Fetish Box III" by Wendi Smith, Acrylic on reclaimed cigar box, pod, beads, thread, 6.25x5.75x1.5in, 2016

"Fetish Box III" by Wendi Smith, Acrylic on reclaimed cigar box, pod, beads, thread, 6.25x5.75x1.5in, 2016

"Fetish Box III" by Wendi Smith (detail)

"Fetish Box III" by Wendi Smith (detail)

"Shell Fetish Box" by Wendi Smith, Acrylic on reclaimed cedar box, shells, acorn, feather, vine, beads, 5.5x8.25x5in, 2017

"Shell Fetish Box" by Wendi Smith, Acrylic on reclaimed cedar box, shells, acorn, feather, vine, beads, 5.5x8.25x5in, 2017

"Shell Fetish Box" by Wendi Smith (detail)

"Shell Fetish Box" by Wendi Smith (detail)

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

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Painting

Vignette: Teri Dryden

“I move between intuition and logic; chaos and order.” – Teri Dryden

"Arroyo Seco" by Teri Dryden, collage on panel, 18x24in, 2017

"Arroyo Seco" by Teri Dryden, collage on panel, 18x24in, 2017

 Teri Dryden has worked in several mediums, and her most recent transition was from a concentration on collage to Abstract Expressionist painting. In these examples, we see how her collage technique conveys a sense of memory, in that that materials peel back to reveal layers of history in the way that an aging wall might. Dryden is inspired by European architecture and has been known to use forgotten posters papered over multiple times culled from those very walls.      

Yet the work is never dusty or antiquated. Although it knowingly references the past, it is entirely fresh and new in its impact; created for the moment. Dryden invigorates her surface through a kinetic process: “I plunge into each piece of work as if it were an adventure into the unknown. With no specific outcome in mind, I respond to the changes in the picture as I explore and interact with materials by layering paint and paper, scratching, sanding, and marking, creating open spaces, altering and adjusting. I move between intuition and logic; chaos and order. Being aware and open, taking risks with the materials, as well as the struggle itself allows me to be in the moment to reflect and interpret a history that evolves on the canvas before my eyes.”

"Line Study," by Teri Dryden, acrylic on paper, 48x30in, 2017, $450

"Line Study," by Teri Dryden, acrylic on paper, 48x30in, 2017, $450

In her paintings, the energetic mark making nearly explodes off of the surface. “Line Study” gives us a glimpse of the artist’s unchecked enthusiasm, a vital, almost assaultive lay down of, bold and vigorous graphics. In “Gypsy Tango,” the energy is only tempered slightly by the layers of vivid acrylic color built up on the mounted paper surface. In both instances, it is not difficult to imagine the artist in action, sweeping gestures of the hand meeting the substrate, leaving a palpable presence in the finished work.

Dryden just returned from showing her work at the Objects of Art Santa Fe 2017 in New Mexico. Presently, she has work in a group landscape show at New Editions Gallery in Lexington. In addition, for the month of October, she will have work at the Robert-Brandt Gallery in Columbus, Ohio for a juried invitational featuring abstract art.

Hometown: Annapolis, MD
Education: Towson University
Website: http://www.teridryden.com
Gallery Representative: View Gallery (Jackson, MS); New Editions, (Lexington, KY); B. Deemer (Louisville, KY); Contemporain Gallery, (Baton Rouge, LA)

"Gypsy Tango," by Teri Dryden, acrylic on paper, mounted on panel and framed, 47x36in, 2017

"Gypsy Tango," by Teri Dryden, acrylic on paper, mounted on panel and framed, 47x36in, 2017

"Buena Vista", by Teri Dryden, collage on panel, 18x24in, 2017

"Buena Vista", by Teri Dryden, collage on panel, 18x24in, 2017

"Shift," by Teri Dryden, acrylic on canvas, 20x20in, 2017

"Shift," by Teri Dryden, acrylic on canvas, 20x20in, 2017

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

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Painting

Vignette: Mary Clore

A Search for Tenderness and Community

"Claire (painter)," Mary Clore, oil on panel, 5x5in, 2016, $675

"Claire (painter)," Mary Clore, oil on panel, 5x5in, 2016, $675

In an age that will forever defined by the domination of social media, painter Mary Clore supplants the “selfie” with traditional portraits painted by hand in oil.

"Hannah (poet, archaeologist)," Mary Clore, oil on p[anel, 5x5in, 2016, $675

"Hannah (poet, archaeologist)," Mary Clore, oil on p[anel, 5x5in, 2016, $675

“This series of portraits explores intimacy and human relationships,” she explains, “in contrast to the contemporary compression of images and information that occurs through technology and social media. I begin each portrait from life, intentionally selecting the subjects from my circle of friends and acquaintances. The sittings are an intimate opportunity to grow closer to an individual, and the resulting portrait offers physical proof of time spent with a person I care about. I am using a traditional medium to create an index of my relationships, mirroring the list of contacts in my phone and friends and followers I have on social media outlets.”

Clore’s work reinforces the old value of the relationship between artist and subject, and underscores that art is essential communication. If her technique is traditional, with supple and sensitive brushwork, her aesthetic is contemporary.

"Scott (musician)," Mary Clore, oil on panel, 5x7in, 2016, NFS

"Scott (musician)," Mary Clore, oil on panel, 5x7in, 2016, NFS

“My generation has received an onslaught of criticism surrounding our use of technology to build and maintain relationships. In my experience, my peers are aware of the limitations posed by these technologies and are adapting to create meaningful relationships enhanced by the technologies available to us. In the same way, my oil portraits have limitations. The paintings employ realism, but I intentionally leave some flatness and traces of brushwork. Sometimes my sitter’s personality will come through in their portrait, while some portraits remain stiff and carry less emotion. My process does not always yield the tender and personal end product that I desire. While each portrait refers to a different relationship, the series as a whole encapsulates the act of surrounding oneself with friends and forming a community. My closest friends make up a surrogate family of artists, musicians, and poets, and their creativity feeds my own. My involvement within an intimate artistic community brings joy and meaning to my work, and informs the imagery I wish to create.”

Clore was selected for this year’s Not BIG(4) Juried Show, at M.S. Rezney Studio/Gallery in Lexington, Kentucky. 

Name: Mary Clore
Age: 23
Hometown: Goshen, Kentucky
Education: BA, Art History and a BFA, 2D Studios University of Louisville, Magna cum Laude, 2016
Website: cargocollective.com/maryclore
Instagram: @maryclore.art

"Corey (psychologist)" Mary Clore, oil on panel, 5x7in, 2016, $675

"Corey (psychologist)" Mary Clore, oil on panel, 5x7in, 2016, $675

"Maddie (cartoonist, bookmaker)," Mary Clore, oil on panel, 5x5in, 2016, $675

"Maddie (cartoonist, bookmaker)," Mary Clore, oil on panel, 5x5in, 2016, $675

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

Are you interested in being on Artebella? Click here to learn more.

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