Painting

Vignette: Charlotte Pollock


"The mind includes more than intellect. It contains a history of what we learn through our feet. It grasps the world that meets the eye, the city we know through our legs, the places we know in our hearts, in our guts, in our memories, and in our imaginations. It includes the world we feel in our bones." - E. V. Walter


Painter, Charlotte Pollock

Painter, Charlotte Pollock

Charlotte Pollock doesn’t just paint what is in front of her. Some landscape painters may, in fact, be documentarians; capturing with accuracy the details of color and light they find before them, but for Pollock, the choice of subject has specific meaning for her: “This series is the result of my desire to understand the meaning of place and its relationship to self. I paint places that emotionally resonate within me as a way to map my biography. Light and color articulate mood and combine with my paint application to make an interior world accessible to the viewer.”

“A sense of place,” is an elusive phrase that can be parsed many ways, but when we speak of art, we are trying to describe how an individual point-of-view of one moment in time might attempt to communicate ineffable aspects of a location. The artist doesn’t create a picture-postcard; instead they share their own unique experience and understanding of a given place, which may be markedly different than the viewer’s experience. It may also strike unexpected chords of universal experience - anything is possible. The E.V. Walter quote that partly inspires these paintings perhaps says it best: “It includes the world we feel in our bones.”

"Have You Got Good Religion" by Charlotte Pollock, 36x48in, oil on canvas (2017)

"Have You Got Good Religion" by Charlotte Pollock, 36x48in, oil on canvas (2017)

For Pollock, these paintings occupy the realm of autobiography, but on her own terms. What you may glean about the artist from these pieces will not be a complete picture, but what is there to discover just might only be available through her work.

Pollock’s solo exhibition, Lore & Landscapes, opens June 2 at Art Sanctuary with a reception that evening, 5:30-9:30pm. Reception is FREE, family-friendly, and open to the public. Refreshments will be available for purchase.

She also has work in On the Waterfront and Beyond through July 29 at the Jane Morgan Gallery in Louisville.

Hometown: Louisville, Kentucky
Age: 26
Education: BFA, Allen R. Hite Institute, University of Louisville
Website: http://www.charlotteannpollock.com

"Old Louisville in November" by Charlotte Pollock, 24x36in, oil on canvas (2017)

"Old Louisville in November" by Charlotte Pollock, 24x36in, oil on canvas (2017)

"March 29, 5pm" by Charlotte Pollock, 16x20in, oil on canvas (2016)

"March 29, 5pm" by Charlotte Pollock, 16x20in, oil on canvas (2016)

"Golden Hour on River Road" by Charlotte Pollock, 36x48in, oil on canvas (2017)

"Golden Hour on River Road" by Charlotte Pollock, 36x48in, oil on canvas (2017)

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

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Vignette: Kenneth Hayden

"Birth of Venus" by Kenneth Hayden, 70x60in, acrylic on linen (2015)

"Birth of Venus" by Kenneth Hayden, 70x60in, acrylic on linen (2015)

Kenneth Hayden’s dense and eye-popping collage-like paintings seem light-hearted, with easy surface appeal for their candy colors. In fact, some of the paintings include gumdrops among the image elements. Yet Hayden is expressing themes that are much weightier, even darker than his Pop Art palette would suggest.

“’Birth of Venus’ was inspired by both Botticelli and the Black Lives Matter movement,” explains Hayden. “I show Venus as a crow rising from a Technicolor field of gumdrops borne by a lotus blossom. Tibetan Buddhism recognizes the crow as an incarnation of Mahakala, whose name literally means the Great Black One. Gumdrops are colorful and delicious. They are an unhealthy earthly treat unsuitable as an offering to Buddha for the attainment of enlightenment.”

In another painting, ‘The Mathematics of Providence’, Hayden employs the image of a gun, a recurring motif in his work that immediately cuts through the busy compositions characteristic of his work. The artist’s reasoning about how the image functions can be complex and mercurial: “A diamond refracts the light/energy/debris exploding from a skull in two different directions. The path heading off to the right has no definable destination or explanation. The left bearing path travels through a black hole represented by a crudely painted diagram complete with cast shadow and illusionistic masking tape holding it to the picture plane. It’s an astrophysicist’s note describing a theoretical portal to another realm to be considered or removed. The letter ‘z’ is the path of entry. ‘X’ and ‘y’ are the event horizon, the point of no return; the boundary in space time beyond which events cannot affect an outside observer.”

"The Mathematics of Providence" by Kenneth Hayden, 56x46in, acrylic and graphite on canvas with painted paper collage and glitter (2017)

"The Mathematics of Providence" by Kenneth Hayden, 56x46in, acrylic and graphite on canvas with painted paper collage and glitter (2017)

“I make paintings about topics that I find interesting or otherwise create in me a strong emotional response. By posing questions surrounding themes such as standards of beauty, our knowledge of our own mortality, or the contradictions of science v theology, I want my work to open avenues for discussion that one might not otherwise consider. I don’t pretend to have the answers, nor do I want to rigidly define the specific purpose or meaning of a work. Titles often provide clues to deciphering my thinking. The image elements themselves frequently have a duality, much like the subjects I contemplate. For example, I use the lotus as a totem for acceptance and awareness, and as a warning to illuminate ignorance. A gun can kill. Or, does it speed one on to ‘the afterlife’ as an unexpected perk? Is death a punishment or a reward? Does an opioid high bring inner peace? And sometimes – a picture is just a picture.”

"Lotus Geometry" by Kenneth Hayden, 56x46in, acrylic on paper and canvas (2017)

"Lotus Geometry" by Kenneth Hayden, 56x46in, acrylic on paper and canvas (2017)

In 2016 Hayden was the recipient of an Artist Professional Development Grant from the Great Meadows Foundation, Kentucky.

Selected Curated and Juried Corporate Art Collections:
21C Museum-Hotel, Louisville, KY
Atlas Brown, Inc., Louisville, KY
Brown Forman Corporation, Louisville, KY
Cafe Lou Lou, Louisville, KY
Churchill Downs Corporate Office, Louisville, KY
Commonwealth Bank (various locations)
Credit Clearing House, Louisville, KY
Dean-Dorton, PLC, Louisville, KY
Jones Ward PLC, Louisville, KY
Olin Brass/GBC Metals, Louisville, KY
Republic Bank, Louisville, KY
Sewell, O'Brien & Neal, PLLC, Louisville, KY
Sortino Group, Inc., Louisville, KY
Tachau-Meek PLC., Louisville, KY
Tamdem Marketing and Public Relations, Louisville, KY
Ventas, Inc. (Louisville and Chicago)
Waterfront Park Place Condominiums, Louisville, KY

Hometown: Owensboro, Kentucky
Age: 59
Education: AA in Photography, Brescia University, Owensboro, KY
Website: http://www.kennethhayden.com

Kenneth Hayden's studio.

Kenneth Hayden's studio.

"Gumdrops for Buddha" by Kenneth Hayden, 84x48in, acrylic on canvas (2014) 

"Gumdrops for Buddha" by Kenneth Hayden, 84x48in, acrylic on canvas (2014) 

"Milk and Honey" by Kenneth Hayden, 48x46in, acrylic on canvas with painted paper collage (2017)

"Milk and Honey" by Kenneth Hayden, 48x46in, acrylic on canvas with painted paper collage (2017)

Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

Are you interested in being on Artebella? Click here to learn more.

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Q&A: Dave Caudill


“My sculpture is often placed in public spaces, and it celebrates attributes that enable all of us to thrive – idealism, enthusiasm and the joy of life.” — Dave Caudill


Artist, Dave Caudill at work.

Artist, Dave Caudill at work.

Dave Caudill and the “Odyssey” project

A well-liked, long-time fixture in the local art community, Dave Caudill has several public sculptures in Louisville: at 6th & Main St, the University of Louisville School of Music, Maryhurst Alternative School, the Crescent Hill public library, and the offices of the Waterfront Development Corp in downtown. His latest project is ambitious, even for an artist who has installed a large metal sculpture on the ocean floor.

How did you first hit upon the idea of “Odyssey”?

A few years ago, I realized the synthesis of a fingerprint and labyrinth could make a powerful combination that prompted consideration of identity and our individual journeys though life.

How do you think it fits in with the themes of your past work? Or does it?

I see it as another iteration of the theme of humanity in harmony with the rest of nature, a theme that I first addressed with an undersea sculpture in 1995.

Do you worry a labyrinth will intimidate people? Are people afraid of getting lost?

Labyrinth concept drawing by Dave Caudill.

Labyrinth concept drawing by Dave Caudill.

Walking a labyrinth is different from a maze, in that once you'e on a path, it takes you to the center and back out again - there is no confusion or opportunity to get confused or lost as in a maze, as long as you stay on a path. Also, everything is at ground level - there are no walls that create blind spots. This misunderstanding is common, but a small plaque at the entrance to Odyssey will clarify the difference.

We are creating a meditative walking experience fused with a bold piece of public art.

You just returned from Bolivia, where you were involved in a similar project. What was your experience there?

The Bolivian Odyssey differs from my proposal for Louisville in that it’s half the size (1/4 the size of a football field) and uses gravel instead of flat terrazzo over concrete for the paths. The Bolivian project is located in a rural area and creating a handicapped accessible design was not an option.

Who are your collaborators, and how did you connect with them?

This unique labyrinth will engage people through the consideration of identity and personal journeys through.

This unique labyrinth will engage people through the consideration of identity and personal journeys through.

I received a residency to start construction from Teresa Camacho-Hull, the owner and director of Ars.Natura.Uta, an art center near La Paz. She has been developing the center as a site dedicated to addressing the need to understand that the wholeness of our relationship to nature is essential to the health of both humanity and the planet. I met her at a sculptor’s conference in Pittsburgh, an event I was able to attend by a grant from Louisville’s Great Meadows Foundation. Teresa’s staff of three men was indispensable for a 2-week schedule.

What would be your dream location for “Odyssey”?

I’d like to see it in an area conducive to reflection and meditation, like a park. That being said, a strong design can go a long way toward overcoming the noise of an urban environment and establishing a unique asset for the city.

Hometown: Corbin, Kentucky
Age: 66
Education: University of Kentucky, 1970; Louisville School of Art, 1973; Anderson Ranch, CO, 2000 & 2001
Website: http://www.caudillart.com

An illustration showing an example of the terrazzo artwork that would cover the concrete paths of Odyssey. Each path would be a winding, evolving, unique design.

An illustration showing an example of the terrazzo artwork that would cover the concrete paths of Odyssey. Each path would be a winding, evolving, unique design.

2017-04-29 11.05.09.jpg

Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved. 

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Painting, Drawing

Feature: 2017 Academy of LVA Seniors, Part 2 of 2


“I learned so much that helped me to become a better artist.” — Mayteana Williams


Student, Mayteana Williams working on a drawing.

Student, Mayteana Williams working on a drawing.

The art of youth is often the transition between the joyful, unfettered creativity of a child, and the first deliberate intention of an adult artist. The senior students departing the Academy of LVA for college in the fall have discovered that they have something to say to the world, and they are choosing to say it through art.

Moving from the idealized and fantastical images of children from Mayteana Williams, to the more polished and well-observed self-portraits and startlingly brutal scene pulled from archetypal childhood we find in the work of Madison McGill, we get some understanding of how young artist may surprise us with caustic social commentary or reach beyond the obvious assumptions of perceived cultural identity. Then Katie Montgomery shows a full embrace of Expressionism and an authoritative command of her medium in capturing raw human emotion. A child’s first art making is fundamental expression of their emotional being – the elemental satisfaction of finger paints, and Montgomery reconnects to that need.

Mayteana Williams – CFAC/Academy student for 8 years
Has been accepted to Spalding University for their college of art and design.

“I am grateful to William Duffy in sculpture, because I had never done that before, and Dennis Whitehouse, because I learned so much that helped me to become a better artist.”

Work by Mayteana Williams

Work by Mayteana Williams

Madison McGill – Scholastic Silver Key
Will be attending the University of Kentucky to major in Studio Arts.

“I learned a lot from Wilma Bethel and we had some great conversations. She has such a loving heart for every one of her students and is an outstanding artist! It was my pleasure to learn from such an amazing woman. Jean Smith was also an amazing teacher. When I started the mural, she graciously took me under her wing and assisted me in any questions I had for her. This was my first mural and without her encouragement and guidance, I don't know if I could've completed it. Both of these wonderful ladies have impacted my life greatly and have taught me so, so much. I would definitely recommend LVA to someone with an interest in art!”

Work by Madison McGill

Work by Madison McGill

Katie Montgomery
Has been accepted into and will attend The School of the Art Institute of Chicago on a scholarship.

“Classes with LVA/CFAC have made me the incredible artist and person that I am today. I've learned everything that I know from being taught and influenced by their teachers, especially Dennis Whitehouse.”

Work by Katie Montgomery

Work by Katie Montgomery

These students, and others, have created small-scale work especially for The Academy of LVA exhibition, which will be at Revelry Boutique Gallery May 19 – May 25. There will be an Opening Reception May 19, 6-8pm.

Revelry Boutique Gallery
742 E. Market Street

Gallery Hours
Tuesday – Saturday, 11am-7pm
Sunday & Monday, 11am-5pm

Work by Mayteana Williams

Work by Mayteana Williams

Work by Katie Montgomery

Work by Katie Montgomery

Work by Madison McGill

Work by Madison McGill

Work by Mayteana Williams

Work by Mayteana Williams

Work by Katie Montgomery

Work by Katie Montgomery

Work by Madison McGill  

Work by Madison McGill
 


This Feature article was written by Keith Waits.
In addition to his work at the LVA, Keith is also the Managing Editor of a website, www.Arts-Louisville.com, which covers local visual arts, theatre, and music in Louisville.


 Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

Are you interested in being on Artebella? Click here to learn more.

Are you interested in being on Artebella? Click here to learn more.

Drawing, Mixed Media, Painting

Feature: 2017 Academy of LVA Seniors, Part 1 of 2


“(LVA) was a game changer from day one.” – Emily Yellina


"Untitled #1" by James Inmon

"Untitled #1" by James Inmon

What will the next generation of artists show us? A glimpse into the answer might be provided in high school seniors finishing the Louisville Visual Art’s (LVA) Academy program. Most have been involved with LVA for years, beginning with Children’s Fine Art Classes (CFAC) in elementary and middle school before moving on to the Academy curriculum, which is only now in its second year, but there is undeniable ambition and individual expression in abundance in the work with which these students have stocked their portfolios.

There is also a sense of discovery; the exploration of medium and technique is fresh and unapologetic. This is the art of youth; the marriage of facility and ideas that is characteristic of artists at this age. James Inmon takes hold of a motif - the Mexican piñata, and places it in a range of scenarios that are tender, satirical, and political; Emily Yellina communicates an intimate, revelatory moment with a small mirror filled with compassion; Juliet Taylor brings heightened color into service connecting with street art in a dazzling, almost hallucinatory image; and Audrey Heichelbech injects a more overt autobiographical theme into dense collage work.

Audrey Heichelbech – Governor’s School for the Arts
Will major in Industrial Design at California College of the Arts

An expressive mixed media collage (paper and thread) by Audrey Heichelbech (2016)

An expressive mixed media collage (paper and thread) by Audrey Heichelbech (2016)

Artist, Audrey Heichelbech

Artist, Audrey Heichelbech

James Inmon - Governor’s School for the Arts, Scholastic Honors
Plans to major in Printmaking and Mathematics at Murray State.

“LVA opened my eyes to new mediums that I wouldn't have thought to try on my own, like printmaking. It's also provided me with resources to allow me to better communicate my own ideas with my art, as opposed to mimicking other artists. Both Sunny Ra and Rudy Salgado were impactful for me as an artist.”

"Untitled #1" by James Inmon

"Untitled #1" by James Inmon

Artist, James Inmon

Artist, James Inmon

Emily Yellina – Scholastic Gold Key, National Honor Society
Intends to Major in Art and Minor in Psychology at the University of Louisville

“In middle school art wasn't an option for a class to take in school, so we looked for an outside class for me to take so I could still be involved in art. That's when my parents found the LVA CFAC class and enrolled me in the class. It was a game changer from day one. Dean Mistler is not only an amazing art teacher but has become to be my friend and mentor in the process. He was the first to mention art therapy to me as a career, when I told him about my brother doing art therapy at the Riley Hospital for Children."

"Untitled Still Life" by Emily Yellina

"Untitled Still Life" by Emily Yellina

Artist, Emily Yellina

Artist, Emily Yellina

Juliet Taylor – Scholastic Gold Key, National Honor Society, St James Court Art Show Sculpture Scholarship

“Rudy Salgado helped me do what I wanted to do with my art instead of forcing projects on me. It helped me to grow with my Printing skills.”

"Pulling Myself Through The Creative Process..." by Juliet Taylor, 8x9ft, mixed media

"Pulling Myself Through The Creative Process..." by Juliet Taylor, 8x9ft, mixed media

Artist, Juliet Taylor

Artist, Juliet Taylor

These students have created small-scale work especially for The Academy of LVA exhibition, which will be at Revelry Boutique Gallery May 19 – May 25. There will be an Opening Reception May 19, 6-8pm.

Revelry Boutique Gallery
742 E. Market Street

Gallery Hours:
Tuesday – Saturday, 11am-7pm
Sunday & Monday, 11am-5pm

"Sheild" by Audrey Heichelbech

"Sheild" by Audrey Heichelbech

"Untitled #2" by Emily Yellina

"Untitled #2" by Emily Yellina

"Energy Is Everything" by Juliet Taylor

"Energy Is Everything" by Juliet Taylor


This Feature article was written by Keith Waits.
In addition to his work at the LVA, Keith is also the Managing Editor of a website, www.Arts-Louisville.com, which covers local visual arts, theatre, and music in Louisville.


Entire contents copyright © 2017 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

Are you interested in being on Artebella? Click here to learn more.

Are you interested in being on Artebella? Click here to learn more.