Photography

Curatorial Spotlight: culturALLandscape

 "Art is part and parcel of a cumulative and collective enterprise, viewed as seen fit by the prevailing culture.  It isn’t just the result of an unencumbered creative act. Everything that is seen and understood is part of a work and art is always a collaboration with all that came before you, that co-exists with you, and that comes after you." — Louise Lawler

Sarah Lyon, Steven Irwin, 2006, Archival Pigment Print, 40x40in

Sarah Lyon, Steven Irwin, 2006, Archival Pigment Print, 40x40in

Tom LeGoff, Matt, 2013, Inkjet Print

Tom LeGoff, Matt2013, Inkjet Print

The intersection of a geographic location and the culture it sustains is marked by how a physical place both supports and is reciprocally shaped by human involvement. Cultural landscape refers to the coalescence of a place with the people who inhabit it and encompasses works of art, narratives of culture, and expressions of regional identity tied to that specific place. Surveying the social and artistic topography of a place reveals aspects of its origins and development, as well as the interconnectivity of the relationships between the physical location, society and its structures.

The provenance of Louisville’s current cultural landscape can be accessed through the juxtaposition and alignment of the work of two photographers living and working in the city– one native and the other a recent transplant. The accompanying artworks unearth narratives about the area’s human geography- how a place and the people that produce creative output in that place serve as the bedrock of its vernacular landscape. The portraits shown here depict individuals who contribute to and enrich the area’s cultural terroir- affirming that the creative outpouring that takes place here is unique and incapable of being reproduced elsewhere. The individuals represented here may be preceded by their reputation. They may perhaps be more easily identifiable by the fruits of their creative labor - the artwork they create, music they produce, or performances they direct- than by their names or faces alone. But portrayed in and through their most valued environments, the resulting images reveal the virtues of the person depicted in equal measure with the backdrop against which they are situated.

Sarah Lyon, Natalie Sud, 2008, Archival Pigment Print, 40x40in

Sarah Lyon, Natalie Sud, 2008, Archival Pigment Print, 40x40in

Sarah Lyon originally viewed her photographic practice as a means through which she could experience her native city, as though she were an outsider exploring it for the first time. She began translating her personal relationships and experiences into an alternative way of mapping the city and its human and geographic landmarks. Out of this practice grew a portrait series that allows Lyon to become better acquainted with those who accompany her on these explorations, synthesizing them with their own personal environments.

The people with whom Lyon re-discovers her city are the figures who appear in her photographs. Consistently situated within a wide visual plane, the space and distance afforded to the figures facilitates an unimposing co- existence between the subject and the viewer. Allowing the viewer to soak in the totality of situational factors that shape the subject’s identity. Lyon’s photographs convey a sense of rootedness, giving prevalence to place and obscuring the distinction between whether the subject’s identity is informed by the impact they have on their locale, or the impact their locale has on them.

Tom LeGoff, Chris, 2015, Inkjet Print

Tom LeGoff, Chris, 2015, Inkjet Print

Tom LeGoff approaches his subjects as a self-proclaimed outsider, his portraits less burdened with history and interpretation. After re-locating to the area four years ago, he familiarized himself with the city by considering those who prominently occupy the landscape. LeGoff’s work magnifies the inherently ‘other’ quality that inevitably accompanies notoriety, imbuing his photographs with an elevated sense of intrigue as he casts his subjects in various roles, as though they were characters in a film noir. Yet, these oft-solicited and dramatized relationships still subtly convey reality. LeGoff intently concerns himself with the parts his subjects play in the locale he shares with them. Without pretense of familiarity, he offers viewers delicate contextual clues from which to deduce their identity, as illustrated in is his photograph, Chris (2015).

This image shows the portrait of an artist who uses the scale of her own body as the guiding principle in the production of her artwork. Using materials such as shards of glass and airy mesh boxes as representations of her own weight and volume, she examines how those constructed representations relate to and react with the environment around them. Photographed near her studio in the Portland neighborhood, LeGoff poses Chris standing at centurion attention. LeGoff references Chris’ own artistic study, arranging the composition so that her figure occupies the same amount of visual space in the composition as the first column in the row of interstate pylons receding into the horizon, reinforcing the relationship between her form and the environment in which her form exists.

Sarah Lyon, Jason Willar, 2005,  Archival Pigment Print, 40x40in

Sarah Lyon, Jason Willar, 2005,  Archival Pigment Print, 40x40in

Though examined from different vantage points, Lyon and LeGoff both identify the terroir that characterizes the unique cultural landscape within which they have personally and professionally entrenched themselves. By documenting their creative counterparts, not merely as an act of preservation, but as a means of acknowledging and propagating the artistic talent with which they co-exist, both Lyon and LeGoff participate in a camaraderie that nurtures a thriving creative ecology that is cross- pollinated by both ‘insiders’ and ‘outsiders’.

 Tom LeGoff, Dean, 2013,  Inkjet Print

 Tom LeGoff, Dean, 2013,  Inkjet Print

Sarah Lyon, Kirby Coleman, 2005, Archival Pigment Print, 40x40in

Sarah Lyon, Kirby Coleman, 2005, Archival Pigment Print, 40x40in

 Tom LeGoff, Mo, 2014, Inkjet Print

 Tom LeGoff, Mo, 2014, Inkjet Print

Sarah Lyon, Mitchell and Matthew Barney, 2004, Archival Pigment Print, 40x40in

Sarah Lyon, Mitchell and Matthew Barney, 2004, Archival Pigment Print, 40x40in

Tom LeGoff, Dario, 2015, Inkjet Print

Tom LeGoff, Dario, 2015, Inkjet Print

To contact these artists or to see more of their work, please visit
 www.sarahlyon.com or www.tomlegoff.com


This Curatorial Spotlight was written by Jessica Bennett Kincaid.
Jessica Bennett Kincaid is currently the Exhibitions Assistant at the University of Louisville Hite Art Institute. Her curated exhibitions include “Hugh Haynie: The Art of Opinion” at the Frazier History Museum, "All of Bob Lockhart" at Louisville Visual Art’s Public Gallery, and most recently, “Joshua Watts- Resonant Disclosures at the Cressman Center for Visual Arts. She studied at the University of Louisville Hite Art Institute, University of Kentucky, Institut Catholique de Paris, and Santa Reparata International School of Art.


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Written by Jessica Bennett Kincaid. Entire contents copyright © 2016 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

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Photography, Digital

Vignette: Micheal Reilly

"Succulent #4" by Micheal Reilly, 32x40in, photography/digital art print (2015), $1500 | BUY NOW

"Succulent #4" by Micheal Reilly, 32x40in, photography/digital art print (2015), $1500 | BUY NOW

Micheal Reilly received his first camera at age six and was heavily influenced by his father, who was an avid photographer. After retiring from a career as a commercial photographer, Reilly now creates vivid, hyper-saturated digital images that begin with a simple photograph, but then are heavily manipulated through digital programs. He describes his work as “Abstract Organics” and all of his images are printed on 16-gauge aluminum using a dye sublimation process that perfectly mimics his vivid colors.

"Blossom Stems #1" by Micheal Reilly, 32x40in, photography/digital art print (2015), $1500 | BUY NOW

"Blossom Stems #1" by Micheal Reilly, 32x40in, photography/digital art print (2015), $1500 | BUY NOW

“My art is the expression of my soul. It is my illustrated vision, the world I see ... or want to see. I want to stretch your imagination, and I come as the naked stranger, exposing my inner feelings and urges, my lust for color, a mild insanity, and my happiness. Joy, I hope, is a primary response – and surprise. I think what I offer is new and unique. It’s me, the real me.” –Micheal Reilly’s Artist’s Statement

Reilly studied in Commercial Art at the University of Louisville, but within a few years, at the age of 24, he had started his own commercial photography studio. The rapid growth of his business enabled Reilly to travel the world creating advertising images for an estimable roster of clients, many of whom were Fortune 100. He was one of the pioneers introducing digital imaging into the commercial photography industry, was featured several times in the industry trade magazine, Photo District News, and was a frequent featured speaker at the International Photo Symposium in New York City.

Hometown: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Age: 59
Education: Self-taught in photography and art (starting at age 6)
Website: http://www.michealreilly.com

"Purple Berries" by Micheal Reilly, 32x40in, photography/digital art print (2014), $1500 | BUY NOW

"Purple Berries" by Micheal Reilly, 32x40in, photography/digital art print (2014), $1500 | BUY NOW

"Thistle #2" by Micheal Reilly, 40x32in, photography/digital art print (2015), $1500 | BUY NOW

"Thistle #2" by Micheal Reilly, 40x32in, photography/digital art print (2015), $1500 | BUY NOW

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Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2016 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

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Fiber

Vignette: Maria Tinnell

"Queen of Hearts Secret Garden" by Maria Tinnell, 6x6x7.7in, coiled linen basket (2016), $524 | BUY NOW

"Queen of Hearts Secret Garden" by Maria Tinnell, 6x6x7.7in, coiled linen basket (2016), $524 | BUY NOW

Maria Tinnell is a fiber artist whose focus is on coiled basketry. She creates her work by wrapping unwaxed linen thread over a braided nylon core, stitching each coil to the next as she proceeds.

Tinnell arrived at this process after exploring a wide variety of approaches to textile art, falling in love with the linen and the surprising durability it brings to her work. The basket as a form carries expectations of functionality that makes the use of fiber materials a small surprise, but these baskets are impressive for the balance of strength and aesthetic appeal, with designs of strong color and pattern that blend traditional and contemporary sensibilities.

"Secret Garden Wearable Basket Necklace" by Maria Tinnell, 4x3.5x2.25in, coiled linen basket (2015), $84 | BUY NOW

"Secret Garden Wearable Basket Necklace" by Maria Tinnell, 4x3.5x2.25in, coiled linen basket (2015), $84 | BUY NOW

“I love making coiled baskets; they are simple and natural. Stitching by hand I do not require loud machines or protective gear, just my hands, needle, thread, and maybe some beads. Historically, baskets have been both basic and decorative. They can help tell a story, record important occasions, and pass guarded messages.

In addition to stand-alone baskets, I have created wearable baskets combining beadwork to match the colors of the linen. I integrate beads and other objects within the baskets. I began experimenting with oral and leaf shaped beads to create draping coils, and I am currently working on baskets with a focus on nature's patterns. Butterfly wings, ladybug and bumble bee patterns, as well as floral and leaf patterns.”

Tinnell’s work has been featured in Arts Across Kentucky and Louisville Today magazine. She has been a Member of LAFTA since 1999 and currently has work at Craft[s] gallery on Fourth Street.

Hometown: Louisville, Kentucky
Age: 55
Education: BFA with major in textiles, University of Louisville
Website: https://www.etsy.com/shop/mtbaskets

"Callalilly Wearable Basket Necklace" by Maria Tinnell, 4.5x4x3in, coiled linen basket (2015), $100 | BUY NOW

"Callalilly Wearable Basket Necklace" by Maria Tinnell, 4.5x4x3in, coiled linen basket (2015), $100 | BUY NOW

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Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2016 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

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Painting, Public Art

Feature: Murals Reflect A Spirit Of Collaboration

Karl Otta at work on his mural at MAPPED OUT.

Karl Otta at work on his mural at MAPPED OUT.

All artists begin with a blank space - a page, a canvas, a block of stone. A wall is, in theory, no different: an open invitation to fill a space with creative design and expression. Yet perhaps it takes a little more vision to imagine filling the side of a building with something that is not a billboard. Instead of presenting the public with a commercial advertisement, why not something that captures the flavor of the neighborhood and inspires community engagement? 

Braylyn Resko Stewart puts the finishing touches on his MAPPED OUT mural.

Braylyn Resko Stewart puts the finishing touches on his MAPPED OUT mural.

Murals exist around Louisville; created by individual artists and often sponsored by community organizations and neighborhood groups, but these efforts, however laudable, are, by and large, disparate projects occurring without synchronicity. They are positive in their impact and done with the best of intentions, but what if these earnest initiatives could be expanded, and given infrastructure to support the desire?

In answer to those questions, Louisville Visual Art (LVA), in partnership with the Center for Neighborhoods, has launched MAP (Mural Art Program) a long-term, sustainable public art program that engages local businesses, professional artists, Louisville Metro, and the greater Louisville community in the creation of large-scale murals to celebrate our city's unique identity and enhance civic pride.

The collaboration was functionally born out of a mural project in Hikes Point in which CFN had engaged with artist Liz Richter to plan and execute a design on a lengthy expanse of wall on the Big Lots building at 3938 Taylorsville Road. In developing her proposal, Richter reached out to LVA’s Director of Education and Outreach, Jackie Pallesen. “That was in late Fall 2015,” remembers Pallesen. “Liz knew community outreach would be important. And she knew we had a lot of experience with that.”

Liz Richter details her Hikes Point Mural and the process behind the project.

That element of Richter’s proposal resonated strongly with CFN Director Tom Stephens, and after she was selected, the communication continued with LVA after both organizations found themselves crossing paths on the hunt for funding. Although CFN had an initiative for public art, P.A.I.N.T. (Producing Art In Neighborhoods Together), it still saw the use and value of collaborating with LVA. “We could have perhaps figured out the answers to some of he questions ourselves, but why not go to the experts instead?” explains Stephens.

Liz Richter working on the public mural at MAPPED OUT.

Liz Richter working on the public mural at MAPPED OUT.

Such a comment points to the shared elements of each organization’s mission, the need to empower diverse community voices while enhancing Louisville's public spaces through the visual arts, and how natural it is to pool resources to better accomplish that goal. Partnerships such as this are essential and becoming more and more common because they make sense. 

The Hikes Point project came about not long after the LVA education team’s research and development for MAP, which had included visiting neighboring cities and meeting with their counterparts in other organizations such as LexArts in Lexington and ArtsWave in Cincinnati. 

Synchronicity was also a factor in providing a first, official salvo in launching MAP, when Ashley Trommler of strADegy Advertising approached LVA with an original design for a mural, called “Flourish.” Trommler had been touring the city looking for just the right location for her inspirational message when she spied a large wall on LVA’s Portland location that felt perfect. 

Mural designed by Ashley Trommler and executed by Ashley Brossart & Alyx McClain. Located at Louisville Visual building in Portland (Louisville, KY).

Mural designed by Ashley Trommler and executed by Ashley Brossart & Alyx McClain. Located at Louisville Visual building in Portland (Louisville, KY).

The newly installed "Flourish" mural was painted by Louisville artists Ashley Brossart and Alyx McClain, and unveiled on July 28. "Flourish embodies the spirit of collaboration between LVA, Center for Neighborhoods and Louisville Metro. Having this mural on our building signifies our commitment to making Portland a creative hub for our city. MAP will create opportunities for local artists and business owners to enhance community engagement and development," said LVA Executive Director Lindy Casebier. 

Mo McKnight Howe, owner of Revelry Boutique Gallery and Board Member for LVA and the Fund for the Arts, worked with LVA’s education team on developing MAP, and organized a kick-off fundraiser at the Garage Bar on August 19 that featured live painting by artists, Karl Otto, Pat Stephenson, Alyx McClain, Ashley Brossart, Braylyn Resko Stewart, Vinnie Kochert, and Liz Richter, with the 8’ x 8’ panels being auctioned on-line during the event. Says How, “Art has a great affect in transitioning neighborhoods. Louisville needs more murals and MAP is the answer to this need.”

Vinnie Kochert at work on his mural at MAPPED OUT.

Vinnie Kochert at work on his mural at MAPPED OUT.

Artists at work on the mural at MAPPED OUT.

Artists at work on the mural at MAPPED OUT.


keith.jpg

This Feature article was written by Keith Waits.
In addition to his work at the LVA, Keith is also the Managing Editor of a website, www.Arts-Louisville.com, which covers local visual arts, theatre, and music in Louisville.


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Photos by Sarah Katherine Davis. Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2016 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved. 

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Painting

Vignette: Andrea Alonso Salinas

"Gray Center" by Andrea Alonso Salinas, 24x24in, oil on canvas (2015), $600 | BUY NOW

"Gray Center" by Andrea Alonso Salinas, 24x24in, oil on canvas (2015), $600 | BUY NOW

When painter Andrea Alonso Salinas states that she paints, “…places that can only be in the imagination and are simply not possible in the physical world,” she gets to heart of how abstraction is born from an artist’s concentration on reality. It is the artist’s job to interpret and comment on what they see in the world, and to spark that same fresh perspective in the viewer. Not to reassure but to challenge the routine perception of our daily existence.

"Suburb By Sunset" by Andrea Alonso Salinas, 24x24in, oil on canvas (2015), $600 | BUY NOW

"Suburb By Sunset" by Andrea Alonso Salinas, 24x24in, oil on canvas (2015), $600 | BUY NOW

In “Suburb,” Alonso Salinas maintains a tenuous foothold on recognizable space, spinning the residential neighborhood into a vertiginous swirl of color and form. In “Center” she has taken up a monochromatic palette, which further removes the particular associations we have seen in her previous work and allows the abstraction to dominate even more than usual.

Alonso Salinas was a finalist in Pitch Night Louisville 2016, sponsored by ArtPrize and 21c Museum Hotel this year. Currently, she is working on interior design projects, and various private commissions. Her artwork will be featured in Art Yellow Book #2 2016, by CICA Museum. Alonso Salinas’s paintings have been exhibited at Revelry Boutique Gallery in Louisville, KY, and the “O” Gallery in Nashville, TN.

Hometown: Monterrey, Mexico
Age: 30
Education: Architecture degree University of Monterrey, Mexico; MBA in Administration, Rioja University, Madrid, Spain.
Website: http://www.art-ark.com

"Hidden Corner" by Andrea Alonso Salinas, 30x24in, oil on canvas (2015), $400 | BUY NOW

"Hidden Corner" by Andrea Alonso Salinas, 30x24in, oil on canvas (2015), $400 | BUY NOW

"Landscape Through The Window" by Andrea Alonso Salinas, 69x42in (composition size), oil on canvas (2016), $900 | BUY NOW

"Landscape Through The Window" by Andrea Alonso Salinas, 69x42in (composition size), oil on canvas (2016), $900 | BUY NOW

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Written by Keith Waits. Entire contents copyright © 2016 Louisville Visual Art. All rights reserved.

Interested in advertising through Artebella? Contact josh@louisvillevisualart.org for further information.

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